Gifford Capital Campaign Approaches $5 Million Goal

Vision for the Future CampaignRANDOLPH – Vision for the Future, the largest capital campaign in Gifford’s 113-year history, is making a final push to wrap up its $5 million fundraising goal. With just
$397,000 to go, the campaign committee is asking everyone to consider contributing to
help raise this final amount.

Silently launched in 2013, the campaign has raised more than $4.6 million to support a 3-phased project: building a new Menig Nursing Home to anchor a senior living community, the creation of private inpatient rooms at the main medical center, and a new, updated Birthing Center.

“Our campaign goal was ambitious, but our vision was as well—to improve our facilities so we can continue to provide the best possible healthcare for future generations in our community, from newborns through old age,” said Gifford’s Development Director Ashley Lincoln. “I’ve been so moved by the hard work of our volunteer campaign steering committee and the generous support we’ve received from our community.”

Lincoln notes that over the course of just one year campaign contributors have been able to see firsthand the impact their gifts have on the lives of their neighbors:

• Residents transitioned into the beautiful new 25-bed Menig Nursing Home in Randolph Center last year and they will celebrate a one-year move-in anniversary in May.

• The hospital opened 25 new private inpatient rooms in December, 2015.

• In June the new Birthing Center will open in a centralized location, with upgrades and four new private rooms overlooking a courtyard garden.

“It is exciting to see that our target is within reach,” Lincoln said. “Our donors’ enthusiasm, and their faith in our stewardship of their gifts, has supported us throughout the entire campaign. We are so close now—I hope people will be inspired to help us wrap up our funding in June.”

For more information about Gifford’s Vision for the Future campaign call Ashley Lincoln at 728-2380 or visit http://www.giffordmed.org/VisionfortheFuture.

Gifford Welcomes Certified Nurse-Midwife Julia Cook

Certified nurse-midwife Julia Cook

RANDOLPH – Certified nurse-midwife Julia Cook has joined Gifford’s team of midwives, and is now seeing patients in our Randolph and Berlin clinics.

Cook received a Master of Science in Nursing from Frontier Nursing University in Hyden, KY. Her clinical interests include adolescent care, patient education, and helping women to be active participants in their ob/gyn care.

Born in rural Louisiana, she moved to a suburb of Atlanta while in High School, and went on to get an associate of Science in Nursing from Georgia Perimeter College. She was first attracted to ob/gyn care after the birth of her first child 16 years ago.

“The midwives who cared for me were amazing—they empowered me as a woman and as a new mother,” she said. “I was intrigued by what they did, and asked them what I needed to do to start on that career path.”

When Cook finished her training she began to look for work in a smaller community, and was drawn by the story of Gifford’s Birthing Center and its pioneering efforts in family centered birth. She also appreciates that her work will include opportunities for well-women and adolescent care.

“I feel that education is so important when it comes to women’s health,” she said. “I especially enjoy working with adolescents because they are at a time in life when information about how to be healthy is taken with them as they transition into adulthood.”

Cook says her husband and four children are also excited about moving to New England, and the family looks forward to living in a smaller community and exploring all the new things Vermont offers.

To schedule an appointment, or to learn more about Gifford’s Birthing Center, please call 802-728-2401.

Winter Landscapes by Kate Reeves at Gifford Gallery

Photo provided courtesy of Kate Reeves: “My Winter World.”

“My Winter World,” an exhibit of 14 watercolor paintings by Vermont artist Kate Reeves, is currently on display in the Gifford Medical Center Art Gallery.

An avid outdoors enthusiast, Reeves spent many years as a professional Nordic ski instructor and says winter is perhaps her favorite season in Vermont. She now shares her love of winter landscapes through her art, creating techniques to mimic falling or blowing snow.

Reeves will use gouache and oil crayon to depict snow-laden branches, or the frost on tree trunks and rocks. In the painting “Skaters Lingering on the Pond” she uses a razor blade to show the marks of skates scraping the ice. A spatter of gouache, blown thru a small screen, creates an image of falling snow—a technique she calls her ‘snow treatment’.

“I like the movement this spatter of snow creates. It gives the work more life,” she says. “Snow brings out the detail and textures of the barren woods and the bright colors of jackets on children ice skating on a pond.”

Reeves began studying watercolors 12 years ago with Annette Compton in Woodstock, VT. She is a signature member of the Vermont Watercolor Society, and has displayed her work in hospitals, libraries, and inns around the Upper Valley. She is one of a small group of artists who own STUDIO 33, a shared workspace and gallery in Woodstock, and also paints in her home in Barnard, Vt.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through April 20, 2016. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Rochester Welcomes Dr. Erwin Lange to Community’s Health Center

Gifford Medical Center

Photo: Dr. Erwin Lange (right) with Rochester Health Center Office Manager Dawn Beriau (left) and Registered Nurse Gail Proctor.

Dr. Erwin Lange has joined Gifford’s Primary Care team and is seeing patients at the Rochester Health Center. He started in Rochester as a locum in November, 2015 and has now settled in full-time as the community’s primary care provider. Lange brings many years of medical experience to his patients. He received a BA from Dartmouth College, a MD from the Brown Alpert Medical School in Providence RI, and completed a three year residency in family practice at the St. Joseph Hospital Health Center in Syracuse, NY.

Board certified in Family Practice, he began his career as a family practitioner in a rural community in New York State before moving into practice as an emergency physician in several NH and Vermont hospitals. When he decided to return to family medicine he was looking for a rural community like Rochester, where he could care for a variety of conditions but also establish ongoing relationships with patients.

Office Manager Dawn Beriau and Registered Nurse Gail Proctor have worked at the clinic for more than 30 years and are introducing him to local families, many who have been receiving primary care at the Health Center for generations. Lange says he really has appreciated how welcoming the Rochester community has been during his first months here. “Rochester really is an amazing community,” he said. “Sometimes people have stopped in just to introduce themselves and visit, and that has been great!”

The Rochester Health Center opened in 1976 and provides family and internal (adult) medicine in a convenient location at 235 Main Street. Dr. Lange sees patients at the center from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and Physician Assistant Tammy Gerdes sees patients on Fridays. Services include: annual physicals, blood work, sick visits, EKGs, chronic disease management, care coordination, and emergency procedures. To schedule an appointment call 802-767-3704.

Gifford Primary Care Team Welcomes Dr. Kasra Djalayer

Gifford Medica Center

Dr. Kasra Djalayer

Dr. Kasra Djalayer has joined Gifford Health Care’s primary care team and is now seeing patients in the Berlin and Randolph clinics. He also sees Gifford patients at the Rowan Court Nursing Home in Barre, where he is the Medical Director.

Board-certified in internal medicine, Dr. Djalayer received his license of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Complutenese (Madrid, Spain). He completed his residency at the Yale-Griffin Hospital Prevention Research Center and did post graduate training in Obesity at Harvard University and in Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology at the University of Vermont. His clinical interests include dementia-related behavioral disorders, geriatric medicine, and rheumatology.

Most recently he has worked at Franklin Regional Hospital (Franklin, NH) and as a hospitalist at the New London Hospital (New London, NH), and the Brattleboro Memorial Hospital (Brattleboro, VT).  “Dr. DJ,” as he is known to his patients, has received both the Patients Choice Award and the Compassionate Doctor recognition for five consecutive years (2000-2014).

“I like to use humor in my conversations, and find it energizing to build ongoing relationships with patients,” he said. “We talk about the details of their medical problem but also about their situation in general—any family issues or other concerns. It’s an important part of good care.”

When not working, Dr. Djalayer enjoys cycling, tennis, swimming, and reading to keep up with current events and new medical developments.

Corrina Thurston Exhibit at Gifford Gallery

Corrina Thurston

Corrina Thurston

An exhibit of vibrant and detailed animal and wildlife drawings by Vermont artist Corrina Thurston is currently on display in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery.

“My favorite medium is colored pencil, and I was shocked at the amount of depth, detail, and richness of color I can achieve,” she writes. “I hope to help it be better recognized as a true fine art medium.”

Thurston turned to drawing as a constructive outlet after struggling with an unknown illness for more than six years. She had to medically withdraw from college, was unable to work, and was finally diagnosed with chronic Lyme disease, Bartonella, two types of pneumonia, an adrenal malfunction, and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. Now that she is on proper treatment and starting to feel better, she is focusing on a career in art.

“Every piece I tackle is an experiment and an opportunity to push the window of what I can accomplish,” she said.

Her work has been exhibited at VTC’s Hartness Library; the Chandler Gallery; Court Street Arts in Alumni Hall, Haverhill NH; the Craftsbury Community Center in Craftsbury VT; and Exile on Main Street, in Barre Vermont.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through March 10, 2016. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Gifford Offering ‘Family and Friends CPR’ Course

Gifford Medical CenterRANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center’s Blueprint Community Health Team is offering a non-certification CPR course, called Family and Friends CPR.

The class is Wednesday, Nov. 20 from 6-8 p.m. in the Randolph hospital’s Conference Center.

The course will cover CPR for infants, children and adults and is designed to provide anyone with the basic skills needed to keep someone alive in the event that his or her breathing or heartbeat has stopped.

All are welcome to the course. There is a $5 fee. It is for the instructional booklet, which participants take home.

Attendance is limited to 12. Register by calling the Blueprint team at the Kingwood Health Center at (802) 728-7100, ext. 3.

The Gifford Conference Center is at the main medical center on Route 12 in Randolph. Park and look for the green awning marked “Conference Center.” For handicap accessibility, take the elevator from the main lobby to the first floor and follow signs.

Randolph Concert Series Begins Tuesday at Gifford

RANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center’s summer concert series resumes Tuesday with the Phineas Gage Project in the Randolph hospital’s Route 12 park at 6 p.m.

A folk funk band from Waitsfield, Phineas Gage features Rob Williams, Erica Stroem and James Kinne on guitar, mandolin and djembe, plus the occasional hooter and harmonica.

The band plays “music for happy brains,” including “grove-filled” originals and favorite covers from the past 50 years. It’s music to dance by and brought to you thanks to sponsorship from Gillespie Fuels and Propane and The Frankenburg Agency.

The following week, on July 30, The Lyra Summer Music Workshop comes to the Gifford park. Lyra Summer Music is an intensive summer workshop for piano and string musicians.

Featured on July 30 in Randolph at Gifford will be students and faculty performing a broad array of classical solo and chamber music selections. The concert is sponsored by Gillespie Fuels and Propane and Catamount Kitchen and Design.

In a rescheduled concert (due to rain), the Friends of Gifford perform on Aug. 1. Performing will be Gifford employees Greg McConnell, Mike Berry and Claudette Goad, who make up Diamonds in the Rough, a blue grass and gospel group. The concert is sponsored by Gillespie Fuels and Propane.

Songs and standards from Chris Smith and Friends follows on Aug. 6, again sponsored by Gillespie Fuels and Propane. Smith is a local musician, educator and writer.

Panton Flats, a blues, soul, rock and R&B group from Vergennes, plays on Aug. 13. Born out of an impromptu jam session at 2009 benefit concert, Panton Flats has been playing its original and highly “danceable” music around Vermont since. Its Gifford concert is sponsored by Gillespie Fuels and Propane and Catamount Kitchen and Design.

Finally, on Aug. 20, fiddler Beth Telford and guitarist Jim Green visit the Gifford park with their Celtic museum. The concert is sponsored by The Frankenburg Agency.

All shows are at 6 p.m. Bring your lawn chair, picnic blanket, family and friends. Concerts are weather dependent. Visit www.giffordmed.org or like Gifford on Facebook for updates. Gifford and the Randolph Area Chamber of Commerce partnered to organize the series.

Gifford Offering a Variety of Trainings for Parents, Children

RANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center is offering a handful of upcoming trainings aimed at children and families.

On Aug. 8, the Randolph hospital is host to both a “Family and Friends CPR” course and a “Nurturing Healthy Sexual Development” training. Both events are from 6-8 p.m. The non-certification CPR course is offered by Gifford’s Blueprint team in Conference Center. Register by calling 728-7100, ext. 6.

The sexual development course is in The Family Center (beside Gifford Ob/Gyn and Midwifery) and offered by Prevent Child Abuse Vermont. The course, aimed at child care providers and parents of young children, focuses on normal sexual development and behaviors in young children, and what both children and adults need to know to keep children safer.

Among the topics to be discussed are how to response to sexual questions and behaviors, and preventing child sexual abuse.

Participants must register by calling Nancy Clark at Gifford at 728-2274.

Clark follows this training with two others – these aimed at children.

On Saturday, Aug. 24 from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. a Babysitter’s Training Course will be offered in The Family Center. The course teaches budding babysitters how to be safe, responsible and successful. It covers good business practices, basic care, diapering, safety, play, proper hand washing, handling infants, responding to injuries, decision making in emergencies, action plans and much more.

Communication skills are emphasized along with being a good role model, and participants receive a certification card upon completion of the course and reference notebook to take home. The course is offered by instructor Jude Powers.

Would-be babysitters should sign up with Clark by Aug. 17. There is a $20 fee to participant and participants should bring their lunch.

Finally on Saturday, Sept. 14 from 9:30 a.m. to noon, Powers will offer a training for children ages 8-11 called “Home Alone and Safe.”

Designed by chapters of the American Red Cross, this course teaches children how to respond to home alone situations, including Internet safety, family communications, telephone safety, sibling care, personal and gun safety, and basic emergency care. Children will role play, brainstorm, watch a video, take home a workbooks and handouts, and earn a certification upon completion.

The cost to participate is $15. Participants should sign up with Clark, again at 728-2274.

For more information on other upcoming Gifford events, visit www.giffordmed.org.

An Inside Look at Haiti

Gifford Medical Center

Photo provided. Gifford laboratory technician Jennifer Celley plays with a young earthquake survivor at an orphanage in Haiti. Celley visited Haiti as part of a medical mission last year and is now sharing images in the Gifford gallery of her remarkable experience there. The show is a fund-raiser for a return trip to the impoverished country.

Braintree’s Jennifer Celley shares compelling images from medical mission

RANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center laboratory technician Jennifer Celley traveled to Haiti in June 2012 for a medical mission through the Community Health Initiative, a non-profit co-founded by Gifford Emergency Department physician Dr. Josh White.

The trip was Celley’s first ever to Haiti and she didn’t know what to expect. Would Caribbean island or post-earthquake rubble await? What Celley found was poverty, desperation, warmth and love.

“Before going to Haiti, I was excited yet nervous about what I was going to see,” says Celley of Braintree. “I had an image in my mind of a beautiful Caribbean island covered with rubble from the earthquake two years earlier. I was unsure and as the plane took off. I felt butterflies in my stomach. ‘Have I made a mistake?’ ‘Maybe I should go home’ ran through my head.

“As the plane descended I looked out the window and saw a lush, beautiful Caribbean island and felt relief. But as the plane continued descending, I saw an island so barren you could see tires burning on the ground, and thousands and thousands of rusty tin roofs staring up at you. It was at this moment that my heart sank. It sank for these people, and I knew then that I was supposed to be on this plane. I was destined to love Haiti.”

At first blush, Haiti assaults the senses. “The heat slaps you across the face,” Celley recalls. “It takes your lungs a minute to breathe in the hot, humid air. It takes your nose by surprise when you smell the rotting garbage and the raw sewage.”

But then there are the people – the thousands and thousands of desolate, smiling, joyful people.

“The amount of suffering that these loving, caring, happy people have to live with every day is heartbreaking, but the surprising part is how they cope with it and move forward. I did not hear anyone complain. I did not see anyone frown. I did not see one tear,” Celley says.

It is these people and these experiences that Celley documented through photographs, and it is these experiences that she is now sharing with the community in hopes of making an even greater difference.

Celley’s photos of her time in Haiti are in her employer, Gifford Medical Center’s, art gallery from the afternoon of May 29-July 31.

Created with the help of Dr. Lou DiNicola and Shari Voghell at the Corner Frame Shop in Randolph, the pieces are for sale. All profits from the sale support Celley’s effort to return to Haiti for another mission with the Community Health Initiative and directly support the organization.

To learn more about this organization with Randolph roots, visit www.chihaiti.org. To see Celley’s show, visit Gifford’s art gallery, located just inside the main lobby (marked “Registration”) and to the left.

Learn more about Gifford and get directions on the Web at www.giffordmed.org.