Scott Rodi, MD, MPH joins Gifford Medical Center

Dr. Scott Rodi

Dr. Scott Rodi

Emergency medicine physician Dr. Scott Rodi has been appointed Gifford Medical Center’s Emergency Department and Hospital Division Medical Director.

For the past 15 years Rodi has worked at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, where he has been the Medical Director and Section Chief of Emergency Medicine. He is Associate Professor of Medicine at the Geisel School of Medicine, and since 2007 has also worked part-time in Gifford’s Emergency Department.

“I came to Gifford initially because I wanted to work in a rural community hospital and to work more directly with patients, which was difficult in a teaching hospital,” Rodi said. “Gifford’s community focus resonates with me, and I enjoy working with an administration that is so accessible.”

A native of San Diego, CA, Rodi first came to the East Coast to attend Dartmouth College, where he earned a Bachelor of Arts (BA) in Biology. He went on to Cornell University Medical College, where he earned an MD, and then returned to Dartmouth‘s Center for Evaluative Clinical Sciences for a Master of Public Health. He completed his residency in Emergency Medicine at UCLA Medical Center, and trained in Orthopedic Surgery in the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, and in General Surgery at Cottage Hospital in Santa Barbara, CA.

While at Dartmouth Rodi founded the Center for Rural Emergency Services and Trauma (an outreach program aimed at Critical Access Hospital Emergency Departments) and was involved in the early development of tele-emergency medicine. He has been named New Hampshire Magazine’s Top ED Doctor annually since 2010, and his clinical interests include emergency department management, rural emergency care delivery, and telemedicine.

Dr. Rodi comes from a long line of doctors (his father, grandfather, and great-grandfather were all physicians), and said because of this it seemed inevitable that he would practice medicine: “I saw that it offered opportunities to do meaningful work and be steadily employed.” Married with three daughters, he lives in Lyme NH, where he is currently working on building an Annapolis Wherry rowing shell.

Anesthesiologist Dr. Anthony Fazzone joins Gifford Medical Center

Anthony Fazzone

Anthony Fazzone, M.D., M.S.

Anesthesiologist Anthony Fazzone, M.D., M.S. has joined Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. He brings nearly 20 years of experience and has worked at several area hospitals, including the University of Vermont Health Care System, Springfield Hospital, and the Catholic Medical Center in Manchester, NH.

Dr. Fazzone attended Georgetown University (where he earned his M.D. and a master of science in Physiology) and received a master of science in Human Nutrition from Columbia University. He completed his residency in Anesthesia at Fletcher Allen Health Care, and residencies in Surgery at Abington Memorial Hospital and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center.

Board-certified by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Fazzone was first drawn to physiology (the normal functions of living systems) and says moving on to medicine and anesthesiology was a natural extension of this interest.

“Anesthesia alters how the body functions, so understanding how the heart, lungs, and neurological systems work helps us take a personalized approach with each patient,” he says. “I can often use regional anesthesia (nerve blocks, spinal taps, and epidurals) to help patients avoid high doses of medication and provide pain relief for patients after surgery.”

Fazzone has most enjoyed his work in smaller hospitals like Gifford because he has time to meet with patients to develop ongoing relationships. After his residency at UVM he knew he wanted to settle in Vermont, and says the Randolph area reminds him of the rural part of western Connecticut where he grew up. He enjoys mountain biking, snowboarding, and in summer relaxes by kite-boarding on Lake Champlain.

Gifford Auxiliary Gives $1 Million to Hospital’s Capital Campaign

Funds raised through sales at popular volunteer-staffed community Thrift Shop

Gifford Auxiliary

Members of Gifford Medical Center’s Auxiliary at their quarterly membership luncheon on November 15, 2015. (Photo credit: Bob Eddy)

Gifford Medical Center’s Auxiliary announced a million-dollar gift to the hospital’s Vision for the Future campaign at the organizations quarterly membership luncheon on November 15, 2015.

Funds for the generous gift were raised through sales at the popular volunteer-staffed Thrift Shop in Randolph.

The Vison for the Future campaign is raising funds to support a multi-phased project that built the new Menig Nursing Home in Randolph Center (which opened last spring), 25 private inpatient rooms (which will open mid-December), and an updated and more centrally located Birthing Center in the hospital (planned to open next spring). The campaign needs just $800,000 to close the $5 million campaign, and hopes the Auxiliary’s gift—created through hard work and small-dollar sales—will inspire others to invest in the hospital’s future.

“This gift represents an overwhelming generosity of time and resources,” said Gifford Administrator Joseph Woodin, who noted that over the years the Auxiliary has supported strategic projects (including the original Menig Extended Care wing, the Philip Levesque Medical Building, and the employee day care center) as well as annual departmental “wish list” items not included in the hospital budget. “The Auxiliary is a key part of Gifford’s success, and truly adds tremendous value to our community.”

The Thrift Shop first opened its doors in 1956 and has been providing clothing and household items to bargain hunters and those in need ever since. The 148-member Auxiliary runs the Thrift Shop, with some paid staff and many dedicated volunteers who sort through donations, clean and mend clothes, price items, stock shelves, and staff the store. Each year the Auxiliary also funds scholarships for college students pursuing health careers, financial aid for students enrolled in LNA programs, and supports other community outreach programs.

Auxiliary President Margaret Osborn says the Thrift Shop’s success can be measured in terms of money raised, but also by the enthusiasm of the volunteer workers, the creativity of employees, and the many community customers and donors.

“This million dollar gift reflects our community’s enthusiasm for re-gifting their possessions through the thrift shop, helping to ensure that we have high-quality local hospital care and good merchandise at prices everyone can afford—from fire victims to frugal shoppers,” said Osborn. “We provide an effective, simplified process that gets unused goods out to those who can use them. At the same time we offer tremendous opportunities for people with vitality and skills who want to give time to community service.”

Woodin also notes the many layers of the Thrift Shop’s community contributions. “We are so fortunate to have this unique community resource,” he said. “It helps the hospital, it helps people with limited resources, it keeps unused items from cluttering homes and out of the landfill, and it offers everyone the joy that comes with finding a good bargain. That’s a universal gratification!”

To volunteer or learn more about the Thrift shop, call (802) 728-2185. For more information about Gifford’s Vision for the Future campaign, call Ashley Lincoln at 728-2380 or visit

Physician Assistant Ellen Bando Joins Gifford Health Care Pediatrics Team

Ellen Bando

Ellen Bando

Ellen Bando, PA-C has joined Gifford’s Pediatrics team, bringing 15 years of experience with pediatric and adolescent patients.

She most recently worked at the Winslow Indian Health Care Center in AZ, where she spent 5 years as part of a medical team providing outpatient care for Native American patients, and working a mobile medical van that brought preventive and screening services to remote communities on the Navajo Reservation.

Bando knew when she graduated from college that she wanted to help underserved rural communities, and first worked in hospital administration.

“I was disturbed by the inequality I saw in access to medical care, and decided that I wanted to make a difference by taking care of patients directly,” said Bando. “I began as a lab technician, and then at age 30 decided to train to be a physician assistant.”

She received a master of Medical Science from the Emory University School of Medicine Physician Assistant Program, completing rotations in pediatrics, family medicine, ob/gyn, inpatient and outpatient internal medicine, emergency medicine, and surgery. She also completed elective clinical service in rheumatology, newborn medicine, and pediatrics, and worked on the Navajo Reservation.

An NCCPA-certified physician assistant, Bando has provided a wide spectrum of primary care services to children and their families, and she has a special interest in pediatric and adolescent care. Other clinical interests include pediatric obesity, adolescent health, and cross-cultural medicine.

Bando practiced at Upper Valley Pediatrics in Bradford VT before accepting her most recent position in Arizona. Wanting to be closer to family in Hartford, VT, she began to look for a position in a rural Vermont community where she could settle with her family. The position at Gifford was a good fit, and she has already purchased a home nearby.

“Patient-centered care is the heart of medicine—I’ve always practiced in a small community where people can get to know you and you can get to know them,” says Bando. “My work with Navajos taught me to be a good listener. I listen to what my patients say and then try to be their advocate.”

To schedule an appointment, please call 802-728-2777.

Gifford Medical Center Earns EPA ENERGY STAR Certification

Randolph hospital joins list of top 25 percent of energy-efficient hospitals nationwide

Gifford exteriorGifford Medical Center was notified this week that it has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) ENERGY STAR certification. The national certification signifies that the building meets strict energy efficiency performance levels set by the EPA and performs in the top 25 percent of similar facilities nationwide for energy efficiency.

Gifford’s Director of Facilities Doug Pfohl notes that while this EPA ranking does not include buildings outside of the main medical center campus in Randolph, energy efficiency has been incorporated into all improvements and new building projects at Gifford since the 1980’s. The hospital has previously ranked high in the national Healthier Hospitals Greenhealth program.

“It was a hospital goal to achieve ENERGY STAR rating this year, and we are very excited to be one of the first in Vermont to do so,” said Pfohl. “We needed an EPA rating of 75 or higher to qualify, and we actually achieved a rating of 81.”

Hospitals apply for the EPA rating by looking at energy use per square foot, taking into account factors such as number of hospital beds, number of employees, and climate. They are then ranked nationwide. Gifford’s ENERGY STAR rating was given after much coordination with Efficiency Vermont, creative design staff, and conservative energy upgrades. A detailed on-site inspection in July proved successful, with a rating above 75.

Gifford exterior“I’d like to congratulate Gifford for achieving this prestigious certification,” said Liz Gamache, director of Efficiency Vermont. “We were pleased to work closely with them to help identify ways to reduce their energy costs and consumption; they are setting a great example for other medical facilities in the state.”

While Gifford has steadily improved energy efficiency throughout the entire organization through low-occupancy settings for heat and electricity, improving kitchen ventilation equipment, and installing internal and external LED lighting, Pfohl said two recent large improvements contributed significantly to the hospital’s high rating:

• A new energy-efficient 90-ton chiller replaced an aging 50-ton unit, and structures were put in place for three new chillers to accommodate future air-conditioning upgrades; and

• An energy recovery unit was installed to capture return air and recondition it for re-use; this “climatized” air requires less energy to re-heat or re-cool.

ENERGY STAR was introduced by the EPA in 1992 as a voluntary, market-based partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency. Facilities with ENERGY STAR certification use an average of 35 percent less energy than typical buildings and release 35 percent less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. For more information about ENERGY STAR Certification for Commercial Buildings, visit

A Message from the Medical Director of the Hospital and Medicine Divisions, Dr. Martin Johns

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Dr. Martin Johns

Dr. Martin Johns

One evening when I was on duty, a 911-call patient was brought into the emergency room. The patient was unresponsive and unable to communicate.

I pulled up the electronic medical record and was able to see that he had been given a new medication when seen at a Gifford clinic earlier that day.

Clearly he was having a delayed allergic reaction, and because I could see exactly what medication he was given, I could immediately give him the appropriate antidote. If I had not had access to the information in EMR, I would have had to guess and start trying different medicines to counteract the reaction.

When another patient was confused about what medications they were taking, I pulled up their most immediate office note on EMR and made adjustments based on what had been done within the previous 24-hour period.

An important aspect of the new EMR system is that it allows medical information to follow the patient through transitions of care across all Gifford platforms: inpatient care, outpatient care in community clinics, radiology, and emergency room visits.

In the past, important information could be unavailable or even lost during these transitions—a clinic might be closed for the day, or important information not yet added to a patient’s record. Now, anyone caring for a patient can view important information and also update the record (adding a newly developed allergy or immunization) or note changes in clinical status.

Gifford’s New Single Occupancy Rooms

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

new private patient rooms at Gifford

Detail of the new private patient rooms, including two hospice (garden room) suites.

Jack Cowdrey“When you’re sick, you really want to be alone. And when you share a room it can be difficult to sleep when the other patient has visitors. When I was a patient in August I noticed that by the time a nurse rolled in the computer cart there was little room for anything else. It will be so nice to have the privacy and the extra space in the new rooms.”     ~ Jack Cowdrey, Former Board Member Dessa Rogers

“Single occupancy rooms will make it easier for us to get patients more involved in their care. The increased privacy will allow nurses to “sign off” to the next nurse coming on right in the room with the patient, so they can be informed and involved in the process.” ~ Dessa Rogers, RN, Nurse Manager, Medical Surgical & Rehab Unit Ben Cronan

“We bring radiology technology to the patients. It can be a challenge to navigate around beds, wheelchairs, walkers, and other equipment in the room, especially if the room is being shared. Sometimes we will wheel the portable x-ray in multiple times a day, and it can be disruptive to others in the room. The patients and family I talk with often share their difficulties with having two patients in one room. The new private rooms will really help with patient comfort, privacy issues, and visiting family and friends.” ~ Ben Cronan, Radiology Technologist

Enhanced Response to Community Need

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Randolph VT hospitalAs many community hospitals find themselves contracting—or even closing—because of external pressures, Gifford is developing models that will expand services to respond to community needs.

“FQHC resources allow us to expand existing medical services and to create new paths to help patients with behavioral health and dental issues,” says Dr. Martin Johns, medical director of the hospital and medicine divisions. “These areas can impact a patient’s general health, and need to be part of standard primary care.”

Integrating behavioral and dental health into primary care
A special behavioral care team (a psychiatrist, psychologists, social workers, and care managers) has been created to help link access to behavioral health services to primary care. This group will work directly in concert with primary care providers in their offices, so services can be seamlessly added to a patient’s care plan as needed. The new enhanced behavioral health services model will be offered at Gifford’s Randolph campus early in 2015, and will then expand to the community clinics.

Gifford has established relationships with local dentists so that people coming to primary care providers with unmet dental conditions can receive care. This program will hopefully expand to include additional dental providers and other FQHC and federal programs services.

Rising to the challenge of increased substance abuse
Medical centers across the country are struggling to meet the needs of people with alcohol and substance dependency problems. FQHC funding is allowing Gifford to expand existing Vermont Blueprint for Health services so providers can better address the special needs of those who are opiate dependent and want to avoid substance abuse.

The Garden Room

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

The Garden Room

Legacy photos (right) are one service the Last Mile Ride funds provide. These photographs, taken by a professional photographer, offer the family an opportunity to capture a few of those last few precious moments at the end of life.

The new private patient room conversion project will allow Gifford to create a second Garden Room suite for end-of-life patients.

This patient room, with French doors that open onto a courtyard garden, has an attached larger room where families can gather to support and comfort the patient and each other in this period of transition.

“A second garden room will double our capacity to care for end-of-life patients and their loved ones,” said John Young, Palliative Care certified nurse. “The Garden Room suite creates a space where families and loved ones can visit, share, interact, or just be present with each other at a time when that is needed. A dying loved one can rest, listen to music, be quiet or visit with loved ones in the attached less noisy and congested space.”

Last Mile Ride (LMR) funds support special services for patients in advanced illness and at the end of life, whether they are at home or staying in the Garden Room suite. These services include massage, acupuncture and Reiki for pain management, music therapy, and help with special wishes and one-time gifts. LMR funds also help make it possible for families and friends to focus on their loved one, providing food, transportation funds if needed, bereavement help, and professional photographs of this special time together.

For patients in this time of transition, the Garden Room adds an option to dying at home or in a nursing home. Dr. Cristine Maloney, lead provider for Gifford’s Palliative Care Program, notes that when families are caring for a loved one at home, the Garden Room can offer a comforting back-up option if things become too difficult.

“This chapter of a patient’s life has great power and poignancy, and surviving family and friends remember vividly how a death is handled,” said Maloney. “We want to help this go as well as possible and in keeping with a person’s goals and wishes.”

4th Annual Randolph Summer Concert Series Starts July 7 at Gifford Park

Market and grilled offerings prepared by nonprofit agencies at each performance

Jeanne & the Hi-Tops

Jeanne & the Hi-Tops entertain the crowd at last year’s concert in Gifford Park. They will return on August 4th, 2015 as part of the 4th Annual Community Concert Series.

Gifford and the White River Valley Chamber of Commerce are once again partnering to offer a summer concert series in Gifford Park.

This is the fourth year that the popular six-week concert series will be offered. Weekly community markets will return, with local vendors selling farm products, flowers, baked treats, and crafts. New this year will be weekly offerings from the grill prepared by a different nonprofit agency during each performance.

Starting on Tuesday, July 7th, and continuing for the next six Tuesdays, a different family-friendly concert will start at 6 p.m. in Gifford’s park (front lawn) on Route 12 in Randolph. Families can bring lawn chairs and picnic blankets for an evening of fun and music that ends around 7:30 p.m.

The concerts are weather-dependent and may be canceled or rescheduled if there is significant rain. Look for updates on Gifford’s and the Chamber’s websites and Facebook pages. Cancellations will also be noted with signage near the park.

The 2015 concert schedule:

JULY 7: South Royalton Band; Grilling by Potters Angels rescue
JULY 14: Jennings & McComber (Green Mt Indie Folk); Grilling by Orange County Sheriff’s Dept.
JULY 21: Dave Keller Band (Smooth New Jazz); Grilling by Stagecoach
JULY 28: Sol Food (New Orleans Brass Band); Grilling by White River Valley Ambulance
AUG 4: Jeanne & The Hi-Tops (Old Time Rock & Roll); Grilling by Randolph & Bethel Rotarians
AUG 11: Possum Haw (Folk Music/Bluegrass/Country); Grilling by Randolph Center Fire Dept.

The 2015 Summer Concert Series on Gifford Park is brought to you by the Frankenburg Agency, Gifford Auxiliary, Chuck Adams Builders, and Gillespie Fuels and Propane.