Gifford Medical Center Earns EPA ENERGY STAR Certification

Randolph hospital joins list of top 25 percent of energy-efficient hospitals nationwide

Gifford exteriorGifford Medical Center was notified this week that it has earned the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) ENERGY STAR certification. The national certification signifies that the building meets strict energy efficiency performance levels set by the EPA and performs in the top 25 percent of similar facilities nationwide for energy efficiency.

Gifford’s Director of Facilities Doug Pfohl notes that while this EPA ranking does not include buildings outside of the main medical center campus in Randolph, energy efficiency has been incorporated into all improvements and new building projects at Gifford since the 1980’s. The hospital has previously ranked high in the national Healthier Hospitals Greenhealth program.

“It was a hospital goal to achieve ENERGY STAR rating this year, and we are very excited to be one of the first in Vermont to do so,” said Pfohl. “We needed an EPA rating of 75 or higher to qualify, and we actually achieved a rating of 81.”

Hospitals apply for the EPA rating by looking at energy use per square foot, taking into account factors such as number of hospital beds, number of employees, and climate. They are then ranked nationwide. Gifford’s ENERGY STAR rating was given after much coordination with Efficiency Vermont, creative design staff, and conservative energy upgrades. A detailed on-site inspection in July proved successful, with a rating above 75.

Gifford exterior“I’d like to congratulate Gifford for achieving this prestigious certification,” said Liz Gamache, director of Efficiency Vermont. “We were pleased to work closely with them to help identify ways to reduce their energy costs and consumption; they are setting a great example for other medical facilities in the state.”

While Gifford has steadily improved energy efficiency throughout the entire organization through low-occupancy settings for heat and electricity, improving kitchen ventilation equipment, and installing internal and external LED lighting, Pfohl said two recent large improvements contributed significantly to the hospital’s high rating:

• A new energy-efficient 90-ton chiller replaced an aging 50-ton unit, and structures were put in place for three new chillers to accommodate future air-conditioning upgrades; and

• An energy recovery unit was installed to capture return air and recondition it for re-use; this “climatized” air requires less energy to re-heat or re-cool.

ENERGY STAR was introduced by the EPA in 1992 as a voluntary, market-based partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through energy efficiency. Facilities with ENERGY STAR certification use an average of 35 percent less energy than typical buildings and release 35 percent less carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. For more information about ENERGY STAR Certification for Commercial Buildings, visit www.energystar.gov/labeledbuildings

A Message from the Medical Director of the Hospital and Medicine Divisions, Dr. Martin Johns

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Dr. Martin Johns

Dr. Martin Johns

One evening when I was on duty, a 911-call patient was brought into the emergency room. The patient was unresponsive and unable to communicate.

I pulled up the electronic medical record and was able to see that he had been given a new medication when seen at a Gifford clinic earlier that day.

Clearly he was having a delayed allergic reaction, and because I could see exactly what medication he was given, I could immediately give him the appropriate antidote. If I had not had access to the information in EMR, I would have had to guess and start trying different medicines to counteract the reaction.

When another patient was confused about what medications they were taking, I pulled up their most immediate office note on EMR and made adjustments based on what had been done within the previous 24-hour period.

An important aspect of the new EMR system is that it allows medical information to follow the patient through transitions of care across all Gifford platforms: inpatient care, outpatient care in community clinics, radiology, and emergency room visits.

In the past, important information could be unavailable or even lost during these transitions—a clinic might be closed for the day, or important information not yet added to a patient’s record. Now, anyone caring for a patient can view important information and also update the record (adding a newly developed allergy or immunization) or note changes in clinical status.

Gifford’s New Single Occupancy Rooms

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

new private patient rooms at Gifford

Detail of the new private patient rooms, including two hospice (garden room) suites.

Jack Cowdrey“When you’re sick, you really want to be alone. And when you share a room it can be difficult to sleep when the other patient has visitors. When I was a patient in August I noticed that by the time a nurse rolled in the computer cart there was little room for anything else. It will be so nice to have the privacy and the extra space in the new rooms.”     ~ Jack Cowdrey, Former Board Member Dessa Rogers

“Single occupancy rooms will make it easier for us to get patients more involved in their care. The increased privacy will allow nurses to “sign off” to the next nurse coming on right in the room with the patient, so they can be informed and involved in the process.” ~ Dessa Rogers, RN, Nurse Manager, Medical Surgical & Rehab Unit Ben Cronan

“We bring radiology technology to the patients. It can be a challenge to navigate around beds, wheelchairs, walkers, and other equipment in the room, especially if the room is being shared. Sometimes we will wheel the portable x-ray in multiple times a day, and it can be disruptive to others in the room. The patients and family I talk with often share their difficulties with having two patients in one room. The new private rooms will really help with patient comfort, privacy issues, and visiting family and friends.” ~ Ben Cronan, Radiology Technologist

Enhanced Response to Community Need

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Randolph VT hospitalAs many community hospitals find themselves contracting—or even closing—because of external pressures, Gifford is developing models that will expand services to respond to community needs.

“FQHC resources allow us to expand existing medical services and to create new paths to help patients with behavioral health and dental issues,” says Dr. Martin Johns, medical director of the hospital and medicine divisions. “These areas can impact a patient’s general health, and need to be part of standard primary care.”

Integrating behavioral and dental health into primary care
A special behavioral care team (a psychiatrist, psychologists, social workers, and care managers) has been created to help link access to behavioral health services to primary care. This group will work directly in concert with primary care providers in their offices, so services can be seamlessly added to a patient’s care plan as needed. The new enhanced behavioral health services model will be offered at Gifford’s Randolph campus early in 2015, and will then expand to the community clinics.

Gifford has established relationships with local dentists so that people coming to primary care providers with unmet dental conditions can receive care. This program will hopefully expand to include additional dental providers and other FQHC and federal programs services.

Rising to the challenge of increased substance abuse
Medical centers across the country are struggling to meet the needs of people with alcohol and substance dependency problems. FQHC funding is allowing Gifford to expand existing Vermont Blueprint for Health services so providers can better address the special needs of those who are opiate dependent and want to avoid substance abuse.

The Garden Room

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

The Garden Room

Legacy photos (right) are one service the Last Mile Ride funds provide. These photographs, taken by a professional photographer, offer the family an opportunity to capture a few of those last few precious moments at the end of life.

The new private patient room conversion project will allow Gifford to create a second Garden Room suite for end-of-life patients.

This patient room, with French doors that open onto a courtyard garden, has an attached larger room where families can gather to support and comfort the patient and each other in this period of transition.

“A second garden room will double our capacity to care for end-of-life patients and their loved ones,” said John Young, Palliative Care certified nurse. “The Garden Room suite creates a space where families and loved ones can visit, share, interact, or just be present with each other at a time when that is needed. A dying loved one can rest, listen to music, be quiet or visit with loved ones in the attached less noisy and congested space.”

Last Mile Ride (LMR) funds support special services for patients in advanced illness and at the end of life, whether they are at home or staying in the Garden Room suite. These services include massage, acupuncture and Reiki for pain management, music therapy, and help with special wishes and one-time gifts. LMR funds also help make it possible for families and friends to focus on their loved one, providing food, transportation funds if needed, bereavement help, and professional photographs of this special time together.

For patients in this time of transition, the Garden Room adds an option to dying at home or in a nursing home. Dr. Cristine Maloney, lead provider for Gifford’s Palliative Care Program, notes that when families are caring for a loved one at home, the Garden Room can offer a comforting back-up option if things become too difficult.

“This chapter of a patient’s life has great power and poignancy, and surviving family and friends remember vividly how a death is handled,” said Maloney. “We want to help this go as well as possible and in keeping with a person’s goals and wishes.”

4th Annual Randolph Summer Concert Series Starts July 7 at Gifford Park

Market and grilled offerings prepared by nonprofit agencies at each performance

Jeanne & the Hi-Tops

Jeanne & the Hi-Tops entertain the crowd at last year’s concert in Gifford Park. They will return on August 4th, 2015 as part of the 4th Annual Community Concert Series.

Gifford and the White River Valley Chamber of Commerce are once again partnering to offer a summer concert series in Gifford Park.

This is the fourth year that the popular six-week concert series will be offered. Weekly community markets will return, with local vendors selling farm products, flowers, baked treats, and crafts. New this year will be weekly offerings from the grill prepared by a different nonprofit agency during each performance.

Starting on Tuesday, July 7th, and continuing for the next six Tuesdays, a different family-friendly concert will start at 6 p.m. in Gifford’s park (front lawn) on Route 12 in Randolph. Families can bring lawn chairs and picnic blankets for an evening of fun and music that ends around 7:30 p.m.

The concerts are weather-dependent and may be canceled or rescheduled if there is significant rain. Look for updates on Gifford’s and the Chamber’s websites and Facebook pages. Cancellations will also be noted with signage near the park.

The 2015 concert schedule:

JULY 7: South Royalton Band; Grilling by Potters Angels rescue
JULY 14: Jennings & McComber (Green Mt Indie Folk); Grilling by Orange County Sheriff’s Dept.
JULY 21: Dave Keller Band (Smooth New Jazz); Grilling by Stagecoach
JULY 28: Sol Food (New Orleans Brass Band); Grilling by White River Valley Ambulance
AUG 4: Jeanne & The Hi-Tops (Old Time Rock & Roll); Grilling by Randolph & Bethel Rotarians
AUG 11: Possum Haw (Folk Music/Bluegrass/Country); Grilling by Randolph Center Fire Dept.

The 2015 Summer Concert Series on Gifford Park is brought to you by the Frankenburg Agency, Gifford Auxiliary, Chuck Adams Builders, and Gillespie Fuels and Propane.

Gifford Health Care Welcomes Physician Assistant Leslie Osterman

Leslie Osterman

Leslie Osterman, P.A.

Physician Assistant Leslie Osterman has joined Gifford’s primary care team and is now seeing patients in the Randolph and Bethel clinics.

She previously worked for 10 years as respiratory therapist at Fletcher Allen, where she learned about patient care offered by physician assistants (PA). PA’s are specially trained to examine, diagnose, and treat patients under the supervision of a medical doctor (MD).

“I was drawn to the PA’s more holistic approach to patient care, their focus on preventive medicine, and the way they act as a resource for their patients,” she said. “I also liked the PA’s team approach in sharing knowledge and decision making.”

Osterman decided to pursue a career in primary care and returned to school, getting her BA at Johnson State and taking additional classes at CCV before entering Franklin Pierce University. She graduated last spring with masters of Physician Assistant Studies.

As part of her training she completed rotations in area facilities including smaller hospitals in New London, Plainfield, St. Albans, and at UVM and DHMC. She did three rotations at Gifford (in pediatric and adolescent care, surgery, and obstetrics and gynecology), where she was especially impressed by the staff’s friendliness and commitment.

“Gifford takes a great approach to patient care and really seems to care about the community, which is important to me,” she said. “Since I am especially interested in practicing primary care in a rural setting, this is a good fit for me.”

Establishing an ongoing relationship with a primary care provider is one of the best things people can do to stay healthy. Someone who knows your health history and habits can recognize changes in your health and more accurately diagnose and treat serious conditions. Primary care providers can also help find a specialist and coordinate care should you become ill or seriously injured.

To schedule an appointment, call 802-728-2777.

Gifford’s 2014 Highlights: October – December

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

October

Gifford completes its upgrade to electronic medical records (EMR). Throughout the year, Gifford primary care and specialty care outpatient practices moved from paper to candidates' debateelectronic records as part of a federal initiative.

Gifford and the White River Valley Chamber of Commerce collaborate to hold the only local candidates’ debate for Senate and House of Representatives candidates.

Gifford's Woman to Woman FundGifford employee Teresa Bradley and her niece, Krista Warner, once again hold a bowling tournament in memory of Teresa’s mom and Krista’s grandmother, Ruth Brown. Money raised supports Gifford’s Woman to Woman Fund and brings awareness to the importance of mammograms.

Gifford announces it has met its state-approved operating margin for the 15th consecutive year.

Gifford meets operating margin

November

Major Melvin McLaughlin

Gifford loses one of the greatest heroes of our time, Major Melvin McLaughlin. Affectionately known as “the Major” and “Major Mac,” he spent the last 40 years volunteering at the hospital, encouraging staff and patients with words of love and friendship. He will be greatly missed, but never forgotten.

Hannaford gift certificate for Project IndependenceHannaford Supermarket in South Barre presented Project Independence with a gift certificate worth $1,500. The gift is used to offset the cost of groceries for the program which provides a daily breakfast, lunch, and snack for roughly 38 participants. When the store manager asked staff which nonprofit they should contribute to, the adult day program was at the top of their list.

Dr. Lou DiNicolaPediatrician Dr. Lou DiNicola receives the Green Mountain Pediatrician Award from the American Academy of Pediatrics Vermont Chapter. He was acknowledged for over 38 years of service as a Gifford pediatrician. Along with a plaque, Dr. DiNicola was presented a 7-foot-long handwritten scroll describing what makes him special.

December

Gifford once again invests $40,000 into the regional economy through the Gifford Gift Certificate program.

Gifford’s 2014 Highlights: July – September

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

July

Gifford concert seriesThe White River Valley Chamber of Commerce and Gifford once again partner to offer concerts and now a farmer’s market on Tuesday evenings throughout the summer in the Gifford Park. Two community barbecues — one by Stagecoach and one by the Randolph Center Fire Department — also draw a crowd.

podiatrist Dr. Samantha HarrisPodiatrist Dr. Samantha Harris joins the Gifford Health Center at Berlin, providing full spectrum surgical and non-surgical podiatric care.

Gifford’s midwives hold an open house to introduce their new team to the community.

August

Dr. Kenyatta NormanAfter working at Gifford since January as a locum tenens physician, orthopedic surgeon Dr. Kenyatta Norman makes her position permanent.

A “Heartsaver CPR” certification course is offered to the community.

Last Mile RideJP’s Flea Market, formerly the Randolph Antique and Artisans Fair, is held in the Gifford park on Aug. 9. Cars line the street looking for deals and meals.

The ninth annual Last Mile Ride raises a record $60,000 for end-of-life care. This year’s event is spread over two days and attracts a record 386 Sue Schoolcraftparticipants.

Sue Schoolcraft of Randolph gains media recognition statewide for her work to make personalized quilts for Menig residents. Her work is supported by the Last Mile Ride.

ob/gyn Dr. Sean TubensOb/Gyn Dr. Sean Tubens joins the Gifford Ob/Gyn and Midwifery team from his hometown of Baltimore, bringing total laparoscopic hysterectomies to Gifford for the first time.

September

Dr. Melissa ScaleraDr. Melissa Scalera, an Ob/Gyn, joins Gifford’s women’s health team, providing complete gynecologic and obstetrics care in Randolph.

Colorado couple, sports medicine physician Dr. Nat Harlow and family nurse practitioner Christina Harlow, join Gifford’s Sharon sports medicine and Randolph primary care practices respectively. Dr. Harlow is fellowship trained. Christina holds a doctor of nursing practice degree.

Dr. Jeff LourieFamily nurse practitioner Jeff Lourie joins the Gifford Health Center at Berlin.

Project Independence of Barre officially merges with Gifford.

Gifford’s 2014 Highlights: April – June

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

April

Gifford volunteersGifford employee Cindy Legacy, who shared her weight loss story in the 2013 annual report, starts a popular “Weight Loss Support Group” at Gifford on Wednesday evenings.

Gifford volunteers are celebrated at a luncheon. In 2013, 120 volunteers gave 16,678 hours to Gifford or 2,085 eight-hour days. Auxiliary volunteers working at the Thrift Shop gave another 6,489 hours or 811 eight-hour days. The celebration’s theme was “Hats Off to You.”

May

Gifford is named a Top 100 Critical Access Hospital in the nation by iVantage Health Analytics. iVantage used what it calls a Hospital Strength INDEX to compare Gifford against 1,246 Critical Access Hospital nationwide on 66 different performance metrics.

Starr StrongStarr Strong retires from the Chelsea Health Center after 21 years. She was the first physician assistant Gifford ever hired. An open house recognizes both Starr’s contributions and welcomes new providers to the clinic, which is packed for the event.

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and officials from the Health Resources and Services Administration release a video holding up Gifford as a national model for primary care.

Casa RinaldiSharon Health Center staff members cut a ribbon on their newly expanded health center. Added are 2,600 square feet and a sign beside the front door declaring the building “Casa Rinaldi” in honor of podiatrist Dr. Rob Rinaldi who helped create the vision behind the popular sports medicine clinic.

New technology is also offered, such as a state-of-the-art Noraxon gait and movement analysis system, and a large wall-mounted monitor for a better look at live ultrasound imaging.

senior living facility groundbreakingGround is broken on a much-anticipated senior living community in Randolph Center. More than 100 are on hand to witness the start of the first phase of the project — a new, 30-bed nursing home to replace the current Menig Extended Care Facility.

A second “Infant and Child CPR” course is held, along with a second “Home Alone and Safe” course, a second “Babysitter’s Training Course” and another “Quit In Person” group smoking cessation series.

“Low Impact Water Aerobics for Chronic Conditions” is offered at Vermont Technical College’s pool for free for those with an economic need and chronic condition who are struggling to exercise.

June

Project IndependenceGifford announces that it will merge with Barre adult day program, Project Independence, at the end of September. Project Independence is the state’s first adult day program and serves 23 towns in Washington and northern Orange counties, providing an essential community resource.

The non-profit organization was facing financial struggles following flooding in 2011. A merger with Gifford means shared staff and reduced costs for the organization, allowing it to keep operating. The boards of both non-profits agreed to the merger in May.

Gifford renovationsGifford is the first hospital in Vermont to “go live” with the Vermont Department of Health interface for syndromic surveillance. The interface is part of federal meaningful use criteria.

Renovations begin on Gifford’s third floor specialty clinics to group medical secretaries, nurses, and patient waiting for improved efficiency and a modern model of care.