Gifford Receives 2015 Business Excellence in Sustainability Award from White River Valley Chamber of Commerce

Emma Schumann and Ashley Lincoln

Emma Schumann, executive director of the White River Valley Chamber of Commerce (left) with Ashley Lincoln, director of Gifford’s development and public relations.

On February 6, Gifford received the 2015 Business Excellence in Sustainability award from the White River Valley Chamber of Commerce.

This award recognizes remarkable efforts to sustain and support the communities of the White River Valley, and was given to Gifford for its holiday gift certificate program.

The program, which distributes gift certificates redeemable at local businesses, allows Gifford to thank employees for their dedication and hard work while contributing to the economic health of the community it serves. Historically, within three weeks in December, Gifford employees spend nearly $40,000 at locally owned community businesses from Chelsea to Rochester, Sharon to Barre, and towns in between.

“For 14 years I have had the privilege of organizing this program, and I can honestly say that it is one of the more rewarding parts of my job. Some Gifford staff members have cried when they received their gift certificates,” said Ashley Lincoln, director of Development and Public Relations at Gifford. “Over the years many business owners have also told me how much Gifford’s support has meant to them during the slow winter months.”

Community has always been important to Gifford. Along with the gift certificate program, the medical center offers scholarships and grants each year to support area businesses and schools; during the growing and harvest season meals include produce from local farmers; and careful consideration of the community needs is considered when planning projects like the new senior living community being developed in Randolph Center.

Lincoln adds, “Nourishing and building healthy, sustainable communities ensures that we will be able to continue to provide quality local care for years to come.”

Levesque Grant Now Available

Phil Levesque

Phil Levesque

Gifford is now accepting applicants for the Philip D. Levesque Memorial Community Award.

The $1,000 grant is given annually to an agency or organization involved in arts, health, community development, education or the environment in Gifford’s service area in recognition of Levesque’s commitment to the White River Valley.

The award has been awarded to a variety of organizations including: Orange County Parent Child Center; Quin Town Senior Center; Rochester, Hancock & Granville Food Shelf; South Royalton’s School Recycle Compost and Volunteer Program; Bluebird Recovery Program; Kimball Library; Bethel’s Playground Project; Chelsea’s Little League Field; Rochester’s Chamber Music Society; Royalton Memorial Library; Tunbridge Library; White River Craft Center; Safeline, Interfaith Caregivers; the Chelsea Family Center and the Granville Volunteer Fire Department.

Community organizations are encouraged to apply. Applications are due by Monday, February 16th. Click here to download the grant application.

The announcement of the 2015 grant recipient will be made at Gifford’s Annual Meeting on March 7th.

Paul Rau Exhibit at Gifford Medical Center’s Art Gallery

Paul Rau

Art by Randolph artist Paul Rau is currently on display at Gifford Medical Center’s art gallery in an exhibit that will run through February 25, 2015.

The fifteen paintings were chosen to appeal to visiting patients with varied interests, from vibrantly colored nature scenes painted in oil and watercolor, to animal pictures, including an oil portrait of a pony that was painted at the Champlain Valley Expo.

Rau became interested in art as a child, painting in oils with his grandmother who was an accomplished artist. He continued to excel in high school art classes and began to sell pieces in several mediums, especially pen and ink. While an aircraft welder in the US. Air Force, he used a variety of metal processing techniques to create many sculptures and air base displays. His recent work explores the field of digital painting

Rau moved to Randolph 28 years ago and attended Norwich University, where he gained greater insight into the arts and literature and discovered new avenues for creativity. As a museum interpreter, he has designed and led art tours at the Shaker Enfield Museum, the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historic Park, and the Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site.

His illustrated book, The Oddities of Dr. Flabbergaster, a book of fantasy creatures of Vermont, is available through Amazon.com, barnesandnoble.com, and area bookstores.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through February 25, 2015. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Gifford Scores above National Average on Infant Feeding Practices

Performs better than 84 percent of national facilities with similar number of births

first New Year's babyGifford Medical Center ranks above the national average for infant feeding practices in maternity care settings, according to the most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) survey of Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC).

Gifford scored 91 of 100 points, performing better than 84 percent of facilities nationwide with a similar number of births per year (less than 250). Across Vermont, the average mPINC score was 88; the national average score was 75.

“Gifford has always been a leader in providing women’s and obstetrics services and supporting moms and babies,” said Alison B. White, vice president of Patient Care Services at Gifford. “This report reflects the excellent care programs embedded in our pregnancy and maternity care, which create an environment that promotes and supports health and nutrition practices.”

Nationally 2,666 facilities providing maternity services responded to the 2013 mPINC survey (83 percent).The survey evaluates participating facilities in seven dimensions of care, a group of interventions that improve breastfeeding outcomes:

  • Labor and delivery care
  • Postpartum care
  • Breastfeeding assistance and contact between mother and infant
  • Facility discharge care
  • Staff training
  • Structural/organizational aspects of care delivery

For more information on the mPINC survey visit: http://www.cdc.gov/breastfeeding/data/mpinc/index.htm.

Gifford’s Birthing Center: For more than 35 years, Gifford’s Birthing Center has been the standard of care for women in Vermont, and today continues to be a leader in family-centered care, obstetrics, and midwifery. For more information call 802-728-2257 or visit http://www.giffordmed.org/BirthingCenter

Local Crafters Donate Quilts for Gifford Babies

Crazy Angel Quilters donate warm, colorful quilts to Gifford’s Birthing Center

Crazy Angels

Left to right: Gifford Birthing Center Assistant Nurse Manager Kim Summers, Crazy Angel quilter Kayla Denny, and Karin Olson, RN

Gifford Medical Center’s youngest patients can leave the hospital wrapped in warmth and vibrant color thanks to a generous donation of 36 baby quilts, lovingly crafted by a group of “Crazy Angels.”

Kayla Denny, of East Bethel, brought two plastic bins filled with beautiful, carefully folded quilts to Gifford’s Birthing Center on January 20, 2015. She explained that the Crazy Angel Quilters— her mother Bobbie Denny, grandmother Gladys Muzzy, and friends Kitty LaClair, and Maggie Corey—have been meeting weekly for over a year to create the donated baby quilts.

“You don’t know how happy it makes us to be able to offer these to families,” Gifford Birthing Center Assistant Nurse Manager Kim Summers told Denny as she and Karin Olson, RN admired the colorful selection of donated quilts.

Denny, a CAT scan technologist at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center says she learned to quilt after her mother taught her to sew her own scrub tops for work when she finished her X-ray training. She fell in love with the craft and has been creating beautiful quilts ever since.

Crazy Angel Quilts

Baby Lola Alsup wrapped in a quilt donated by Crazy Angel Quilters

Inspired by Project Linus, a national nonprofit that provides homemade blankets to children in need, the The Crazy Angels wanted to do something for local children. “We all loved to sew and enjoyed sewing together,” said Denny. She estimates that each quilt takes five hours to complete. When not sewing with the Crazy Angels, Denny creates quilts to sell through her business, Sew Many Stitches.

Within hours of the donation, Monica and AJ Alsup of Thetford Center, VT, stood before a bed covered with quilts, trying to choose one for their day-old daughter. The happy family left for home with a sleeping baby Lola, warmly enveloped in playful owls, pink hearts, and polka dots.

Gifford’s Oncology Program Receives American College of Surgeons Accreditation

Renewal marks hospital’s 49th year
of providing local quality cancer care

Commission on Cancer accredited programThe oncology program at Gifford Medical Center has received accreditation from the Commission on Cancer (CoC) of the American College of Surgeons.

Every three years the CoC accreditation program reviews hospital oncology services to ensure that they conform to commission standards and are committed to providing the highest level of quality cancer care (learn more here). After a rigorous evaluation process and on-site performance review, Gifford received accreditation through 2016.

“Our goal is to make sure people know that they can receive the same quality of care offered at larger hospitals close to home, with a support network they know,” said Rebecca O’Berry, vice-president of surgery and operations at Gifford. “The accreditation process is work for our entire oncology team, but it is worth the effort. Battling a cancer diagnosis is hard enough—I’m thankful that we can provide quality cancer care locally and decrease our patient’s travel time during treatment.”

One of smallest hospitals in nation to hold CoC accreditation, Gifford has done so since 1965. Gifford’s oncology services include:

  • Cancer care from experienced oncologist Dr. John Valentine
  • Compassionate and specially certified oncology nurses
  • Lab and diagnostic services
  • Advanced diagnostic technology, including stereotactic breast imaging
  • Patient navigator help with planning options for treatment and to coordinate care
  • Outpatient chemotherapy
  • Preventative cancer screenings
  • Hospital specialists, surgeons, and a robust palliative care program

For more information, visit www.giffordmed.org/Oncology, or call (802) 728-2322.

Podiatry care when you need it most

Emily Wheeler certainly didn’t want an injury so late in her pregnancy but was glad for the care she received

This article was published in Gifford’s Fall 2014 Update Community Newsletter.

Dr. Samantha HarrisEight months into her pregnancy, Emily Wheeler of Corinth didn’t expect to need a podiatrist.

But the unlikely happened. The day after her baby shower on a routine walk out her front door, she fell down her steps. Her first concern was for her baby and she rushed to Gifford’s Birthing Center for monitoring. Only after determining that her baby was fine did she go upstairs to the Emergency Department to have what she suspected was a broken ankle X-rayed.

She followed up with Gifford podiatrist Dr. Samantha Harris of the Gifford Health Center at Berlin. Dr. Harris confirmed Emily’s worry. Her ankle was fractured. She spent the last weeks of her pregnancy in an air cast and wheelchair.

Emily had never heard of Dr. Harris before. She is new to Gifford, but Emily was familiar with the Berlin health center. She was already going there for her prenatal care with Gifford’s midwives. Now she had another reason to go.

“She was really quick with the diagnosis and quick to give treatment,” says Emily, praising her new podiatrist. “The office there has been really great and Dr. Harris has been available.”

Emily delivered a healthy, 10-pound baby boy in August. Days later she headed back to Gifford Health Center at Berlin to get back on her feet once again and – now for a third reason – to have Owen’s first check-up.

About the health center
The Gifford Health Center at Berlin, located off Airport Road, offers a full spectrum of care, including family and internal medicine, help with infectious diseases, midwifery, neurology, orthopedics, urology, and podiatry.

About Dr. Harris
Dr. Harris joined Gifford in July from a practice in her native Tennessee. She got her start in medicine as a physical therapist and went on to attend Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine in Independence, Ohio. Her residency in podiatric medicine and surgery at Mercy St. Vincent Medical Center in Toledo followed.

A desire to start farming and produce maple syrup brought her to Vermont, and she found the right fit at Gifford, which is home to four podiatric surgeons working out of Gifford clinics in Randolph, Sharon, and Berlin.

Dr. Lou DiNicola Honored By the Vermont Medical Society

Dr. Lou DiNicola

Dr. Lou DiNicola with award and scroll

Randolph pediatrician and former president of the American Academy of Pediatrics Vermont Chapter, Louis DiNicola, M.D., received the Green Mountain Pediatrician Award on Friday, November 14 at the chapter’s annual meeting in Montpelier.

Surrounded by approximately 50 of his Vermont colleagues, Dr. DiNicola was acknowledged for over 38 years of service as a Gifford pediatrician. The award is given annually to an outstanding pediatrician for their dedication and contribution to children’s health in the state.

“I was very surprised,” Dr. DiNicola said. “It humbles me when I am recognized. I do what I love; this is what makes me tick.”

The award was presented by long-time friend and colleague, Dr. Kim Aakre of Springfield. In addition to a plaque, she presented a 7-foot handwritten scroll, describing what makes Dr. DiNicola special. The scroll added even more emotion to the event.

DiNicola shared, “I lost a longtime neighbor and friend earlier in the day. This handmade gift has helped fill that hole in my heart; the timing was perfect.”

Project Independence receives welcome donation from Hannaford

Gift to support purchase of groceries

Hannaford donation to Project Independence

Pictured from left: Hannaford store manager Jeannette Segale, Project Independence chef Pam, participants Paul, Diana, John and Project Independence executive director Dee Rollins.

Hannaford Supermarket in South Barre recently presented Project Independence with a much welcomed donation. Totaling $1,500 in gift certificates, the gift will be used to offset the cost of groceries for the program which provides a daily breakfast, lunch and snack for roughly 38 participants.

The supermarket chain, which operates in five northeast states, continually supports regional and local non-profit organizations. Recently six of Vermont’s fourteen Hannaford stores conducted a milk drive in conjunction with the Vermont Foodbank. When store manager Jeannette Segale asked her department managers what non-profit the South Barre store should contribute to, the adult day program was at the top of their list.

“We have so much respect for what Project Independence does, for the care they give our elders. We wanted to recognize that,” says Seagle. “We’re always looking for a way to give back to the community.”

For a company whose core business is food, their involvement with the adult day program is one of mutual support. The two have shared a long and satisfying relationship, with the program purchasing the bulk of their groceries from the supermarket, many of which are funded through the center’s Adopt-a-Grocery Week program. Started in 2013, the program is a fundraising effort in which donors can sponsor an entire week’s worth of groceries. Since its inception, it has raised over $7,000 to defray the cost of food.

“Hannaford has been a partner of Project Independence for many years and many of our participant’s families shop there,” says Project Independence director Dee Rollins. “Hannaford truly understands the needs of our elders and supports us with all their hearts in providing the services our participants receive. We are very thankful for their support.”

Partnerships such as the one with Hannaford, along with the Vermont Foodbank, ensure the center maintains its commitment to providing healthy, fresh and delicious home style meals for their participants.

Rollins also noted that Hannaford is not only an excellent partner when it comes to feeding their participants; they are supportive of the program as a whole. Recently they shared with Rollins how they’re just as excited about the recent merger with Gifford as Project Independence is. It’s a merger that secures the future of the organization’s continued care of area elders.

For more information on the Adopt-a-Grocery Week program, please call Project Independence at (802) 476-3630.

Gifford and Project Independence merger official

Two organizations solidify commitment
to the care of area seniors

Dee Rollins and Linda Minsinger

Project Independence executive director Dee Rollins joins ribbons with Linda Minsinger, Executive Director of Gifford Retirement Community.

On September 30th, Project Independence and Gifford Retirement Community, part of Gifford Health Care in Randolph, officially merged in a ceremony and celebration held at the Barre-based adult day program.

The ribbon joining ceremony was attended by representatives from both organizations, participants and their families, dignitaries, and special guests, including Project Independence founder Lindsey Wade.

The merger comes after years of struggle for the independent adult care program, Vermont’s oldest, which faced flood recovery efforts in 2011 in addition to other facility issues and financial woes.

“It is very hard in these changing times in health care for a stand-alone nonprofit to make ends meet,” says Project Independence executive director Dee Rollins. “Merging with Gifford allows us to be off the island with more supports and resources so we can grow our services for our elders and caregivers. Gifford is the right and best partner Project Independence could imagine.”

While still responsible for their own bottom line and fundraising efforts, Project Independence now has the resources and backing of the financially stable Gifford to help maintain ongoing services.

Joe Woodin, Dee Rollins and Steve Koenemann

Gifford CEO Joe Woodin officially welcomes Project Independence to the Gifford family, shaking hands with board president Steve Koenemann and executive director Dee Rollins.

And the center is already experiencing the benefits of being part of a larger organization through savings in expenses and access to a wider range of resources.

For example, Project Independence is now able to utilize purchase point buying for a savings on supplies and groceries while also benefiting from the services of established Gifford departments such as billing, payroll, human resources, marketing, and others.

For Gifford, the merge is an opportunity to expand on its commitment to the region’s seniors. Already home to an award-winning nursing home and a successful adult day program located in Bethel, Gifford has a strong foundation in caring for the aging.

It’s a foundation they are building upon with the creation of a senior living community in Randolph Center. This new community will include a nursing home, assisted living and independent living units.

Construction on the campus began this past spring with work focusing on infrastructure and the building of a new Menig Extended Care facility, the 30-bed nursing home currently connected to the main hospital.

Current Menig residents are expected to transition to the new facility when construction is completed in the spring of 2015, a time that will also see the ground breaking of the first independent living facility.