Evolving Photographer Ken Goss in Gifford Gallery Wednesday

photographer Ken Goss

Photographs like this one, “Cascading Serenity,” taken in Berlin, Vt., are among the diverse works by experienced photographer Ken Goss of Randolph on display in the Gifford Gallery from Nov. 27 through Jan. 29. (Photo provided)

Ken Goss spent a career in precision aerial photography.

It was business.

In his retirement, he makes art – art that will be on display in the Gifford Medical Center gallery from Nov. 27 through Jan. 29.

The show is an eclectic mix of landscapes, still life and portraits, and is the latest from this evolving and popular local photographer.

Goss was first introduced to photography in high school, but the majority of his photography training came during his military career. “After I enlisted in the Marine Corps, I went through naval photo school in Pensacola, Fla., for aerial reconnaissance and photo interpretation,” Goss says. “Two years later I went through advanced 70 mm photo school at the naval air station in Jacksonville, Fla.”

After the military, Goss went on to work in both freelance photography and in a commercial studio for a short time. The bulk of his career, though, was in precision aerial photography, topographic mapping and aerial survey first with a civil engineering company on Long Island, N.Y., and then for his own business, Aerial Photo and Survey Corp., also on Long Island. He worked in the field for more than 40 years.

photographer Ken Goss

“Violin & Rose” is a still life by Randolph photographer Ken Goss that appears in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery beginning Wednesday afternoon. (Photo provided)

Along the way he had some remarkable accomplishments, including assisting the nation’s space program. He helped develop applied aerial photographic techniques for use in flight training simulators under contract to NASA and was a team member in the development of the original “Luna model” in the Apollo program.

Goss retired in the 1990s and moved to Vermont in 2003.

Since he’s worked as the chair of the Chandler Art Gallery from 2006 to 2008, has taught the basics of black and white photography at the White River Craft Center since 2009 and shown his works around the region.

“Now being again able to pursue photography as an ‘art’ form, I try to take what I feel in my heart or in spirit about a subject, capture it in film (or digitally) and print in such a manner to give the viewer the same feeling,” Goss says. “This transference of feelings, if successful, gives me all the satisfaction of the art that I need.”

To see Goss’ art, visit the Gifford Gallery. It is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 or Volunteer Coordinator Julie Fischer at (802) 728-2324 for more information, or visit www.giffordmed.org.

ESGR Honors Gifford’s Rebecca O’Berry

Hospital VP receives ‘Patriot Award’ for support of citizen soldiers

ESGR

David Wheel, executive director of the Vermont Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve presents Gifford Medical Center Vice President of Surgery Rebecca O’Berry with a Patriot Award. Joining in receiving the award are, from left, Gifford Surgery Nurse Manager Jamie Floyd, Gifford Surgical Services Office Manager Bethany Osha, Wheel, O’Berry, Guard specialist and Gifford health care assistant Marc Truedson, and former Guard member and Gifford registered nurse Caitlyn Bushey. Truedson nominated O’Berry for the award. (Provided: Robin Palmer)

Marc Truedson’s commitment to serve the country as a specialist in the Vermont National Guard means time away from work as a health care assistant at Gifford Medical Center. Truedson’s employer supports his time away, filling shifts so that he can serve.

Recently Truedson discovered a way to thank Gifford and his senior manager, Vice President of Surgery Rebecca O’Berry, for that support. He nominated O’Berry for a Patriot Award through the Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR).

The ESGR is a Department of Defense operational committee that, with the help of volunteers, promotes and enhances civilian employer support of citizen soldiers.

On Monday afternoon, Vermont ESGR Executive Director David Wheel delivered the award and many kind words to O’Berry and her team. Continue reading

Living with Bipolar Disorder

people with bipolar disorder

Free event includes film, discussion

RANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center, in collaboration with the Vermont chapter of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the Clara Martin Center, is hosting a May 1 free educational program called “Living with Bipolar Disorder.”

The 5:30-7:30 p.m. event in Gifford’s Conference Center features a film by the same title with a discussion to follow. The 43-minute film features an introduction by actor Joe Pantoliano, a review of the illness by clinical expert Dr. Joe Calabrese of Case Medical Center in Cleveland and stories of people who have bipolar disorder or have been affected by it. Continue reading

Gifford Shares Achievements, Plans

Gifford logo

Annual Corporators Meeting postponed

RANDOLPH – Each March Gifford Medical Center’s corporators gather to review the year past. This year, the 107th Annual Meeting of the Gifford Corporators has been postponed, but the hospital did not want to delay in sharing a few of 2012’s many successes and some plans for the future.

The meeting will be rescheduled, allowing for corporators to hold their annual business meeting, elect new board members and discuss health care reform.

Year in review

The end of the 2012 fiscal year marked another year “in the black” for Gifford. This is the 13thconsecutive year the medical center has achieved both its budget and operating margin – a feat unheard of at other Vermont hospitals.

The year also brought numerous awards and recognitions for the medical center. The Vermont House of Representatives honored Gifford with a legislative resolution of support and thanks. The Robin’s Nest Child Enrichment Center, Gifford’s day care, once again earned five STARS from the Vermont STep Ahead Recognition System.

The Menig Extended Care Facility nursing home was named a 2012 Best Nursing Home and an Honor Roll nursing home by U.S. News and World Report – the latter naming it one of the best 39 nursing homes in the country. (Menig just last month earned a 2013 Best Nursing Home recognition once again). Menig also received the state’s Nursing Home Quality Recognition.

The March of Dimes recognized Gifford with a Leadership Legacy award for its commitment to prenatal, birth and newborn care. Long-time pediatrician Dr. Lou DiNicola was recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the first-ever “CDC Childhood Immunization Champion” for the state of Vermont. Gifford was awarded a Hospital of Choice Award from The American Alliance of Healthcare Providers for courtesy and compassion.

Continue reading

Menig Once Again Ranked Among Nation’s Best!

Gifford Medical Center

From left, Menig Extended Care Facility licensed nursing assistants Loretta Cushing and Darlene Doyle and licensed practical nurse Anne Murphy gather around nursing home resident Della Allen, 99, on Wednesday. The nursing home at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph was recognized among the nation’s 2013 Best Nursing Homes.

RANDOLPH – For a third consecutive year, the Menig Extended Care Facility at Gifford Medical Center has been named among the nation’s very best nursing homes by U.S. News & World Report.

Looking at Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data regarding health inspection, level of nursing staffing and quality of care for nearly 16,000 nursing homes nationwide, U.S. News & World created and released a “2013 Best Nursing Homes” list on Tuesday. Menig, along with seven other Vermont nursing homes, made the list for its “five-star” (the maximum available) rating.

Menig was also recognized in 2011 and 2012 and was named among the top 39 nursing homes in the nation last year.

“I am so proud of the Menig staff. We work in a place that is clean, well maintained, has great food and a dedicated pool of volunteers who love the elderly. Varied activities keep the residents’ quality of life high. This teamwork and our nursing staff’s commitment to care are what make Menig such a high-quality home,” said Cindy Richardson, Menig director of nursing. “This honor is wonderful recognition of the work we do on behalf of our residents every day.”

The U.S. News list is created to help consumers find quality nursing home care. Homes are given between one and five stars in the rankings.

“Fewer than one out of every five nursing homes got an overall rating of five stars,” said Avery Comarow, U.S. News health rankings editor. “All seniors deserve the best nursing care available, and these are homes that merit their consideration by demonstrating such high quality.”

Menig is a 30-bed nursing home attached to Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. The medical center is currently amid the permitting process to move the nursing to Randolph Center where it would become the anchor of a senior living community. The new community would include independent and assisted living as well, helping to meet a significant community need for more senior care and living options. The move would also free up space at Gifford to create industry-standard single inpatient rooms (rather than shared two-person rooms) for patient safety and privacy.

Learn more about the nursing home rankings here. Also, you can learn more about Menig online at www.giffordmed.org.

 

South Royalton Family Welcomes First Baby of New Year at Gifford

Gifford Medical Center

Mom Sara Bowen, big sister Cassidy Sedor and dad Shawn Sedor, all of South Royalton, cuddle their newest family member – Kaydence Sedor, born on Jan. 2 at Gifford Medical Center and the Randolph hospital’s first baby of the new year.

RANDOLPH – Sara Bowen and fiancé Shawn Sedor of South Royalton were the first to welcome a baby in the new year at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph.

Bowen gave birth to daughter, Kaydence Sedor, on Jan. 2 at 10:29 p.m. A gorgeous and healthy Kaydence weighed in at 7 pounds 12 ounces and is 20 ½ inches long.

She is the couple’s second child. Two-year-old Cassidy Sedor was also born at Gifford.

The family was excited to have the first baby of the new year. “It’s really cool, actually,” said Bowen, but they were more excited with the newest member of their family, regardless of her birthdate.

“I’m lost for words. I love my kids. They’re amazing. (There’s) nothing better than to have kids,” said Bowen, who was originally due to give birth on Dec. 28.

Gifford Medica Center“We’ve got another little one to add to the family. (Kaydence) has someone to look up to and (Cassidy) has someone to take care of,” added Shawn. “I’m just glad that she’s healthy. We are lucky to have this blessing in our life.”

Gifford Craft Fair Nov. 16 and 17

craft fairMark your calendars: Gifford Medical Center’s Annual Craft Fair in support of the hospital’s Adult Day Program is coming Nov. 16 and 17.

The Craft Fair – now in its 17th year – takes place in the hospital’s Conference Center, hallways, spacious visitors’ entrance and the adjoining Menig Extended Care Facility’s large living room from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, Nov. 16 and from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 17.

The fair is an opportunity to start your holiday shopping while also supporting a worthy cause: Gifford Adult Day Program activities.

Adult Day provides safe day care, personal hygiene help, medication administration, healthy meals, activities and socialization to the elderly and disabled below the Bethel Health Center on Route 107.

The fair also supports our local craftspeople.

Items for sale will include handcrafted jewelry, homemade baked goods and foods, woodcrafts, quilting, homemade pillows, hand painted Christmas ornaments, and more made by area crafters.

The fair is open to the public and all are welcome.

Vendor space is still available, although vendors signing up now must supply their own table. Call organizer Bonnie Pettit at 763-8828 to become a vendor or learn more.

Gifford is on Route 12 south of Randolph village at 44 S. Main St. The Conference Center entrance is just off from the patient parking area and is marked. The handicapped-accessible visitors’ entrance, where crafts are also expected to be on display, is on the southern end of the hospital. Signs will also help guide you.

Donor Profile: The Gifford Medical Center Auxiliary

The following is an excerpt from the 2011 Annual Report.

Facilitating a circle of giving

Gifford Auxiliary

Linnie Laws, Kathy Corrao, and Ginny Cantlin knit and crochet hats and mittens for area school children in need. In 2011, 150 pieces were made by
Auxiliary members and their friends.

The Gifford Medical Center Auxiliary is an organization both supported and motivated by donations. Among the medical center’s largest monetary contributors, the now 105-year-old Auxiliary is able to give so much because of the generosity it receives from the
community and its 135 members.

Auxiliary members knit hats and mittens for school children in need and contribute to the Randolph Area Food Shelf and Salvation Army. They help area youth and other area residents pursue health care careers or advance their careers through scholarships. They also volunteer at the Thrift Shop.

A staple in the community for 55 years, the Thrift Shop on the surface is a place to buy bargain-priced wears. Seemingly immune to any stereotypes the Thrift Shop is a source of pride for its shoppers, a daily gathering place for some and a resource to many truly in need.

“Terrible times have fallen upon us, and I just don’t know what to do,” Thrift Shop Manager Dianne Elias often hears. “When people are in true need, they know they can come to us.”

The Thrift Shop is also the main source of revenue for the Auxiliary’s generosity, and it is the community’s place to recycle good quality, unwanted clothes, and small household items, like kitchen ware and linens. The community’s generosity in giving to the Thrift Shop is evident in the piles of boxes and bags that fill the business’ receiving dock each day, but a single event in 2011 highlighted that generosity like no other, and that was
Tropical Storm Irene.

Many families lost everything, and Vermonters sprang into action.

“Every single person wanted to help,” recalls Dianne, “but didn’t know how to help, so they cleaned out their closets.”

The Thrift Shop was inundated.

“The generosity of the Vermont people was literally overwhelming,” says Auxiliary President David Peirce.

Gifford Auxiliary sale

Community members crowd into a tent filled with giveaways following
Tropical Storm Irene.

The dock overflowed. Donations filled all available storage space at the store and neighboring hospital. David counted the cars pulling up – 12 an hour, or one every five minutes. It went on for weeks. Eventually on a chilly October weekend two months after the flood, the Auxiliary held a giveaway and in the continued spirit of community, everyone pitched in.

The Thrift Shop’s 40 volunteers sorted the donations into men’s, women’s, pants, shirts, etc. Randolph Union High School Encore Theater Co. students worked with advisor Brian Rainville to carry the clothes from storage to tables set up under a tent. Their volunteer work was in thanks for the many costumes the Thrift Shop provides to the school.

Students from Tom Harty’s public safety and criminal justice class at Randolph Technical Career Center guarded the clothing overnight in below-freezing temperatures for the sale the next morning. In typical grateful fashion, the Auxiliary thanked them with a donation to their program.

Gifford Auxiliary sale

The same tent by 4 p.m. that afternoon.

The sale was scheduled to last two days: Saturday, Oct. 29 and Sunday, Oct. 30, but by 4 p.m. Saturday nearly everything was gone.

Of course, the donations kept coming in and plenty of goods along with vouchers for free items were offered to families rebuilding after Irene. Fire victims and others in need also often receive free goods.

For paying customers, their spending at the Thrift Shop ultimately goes to the medical center and its patients. In 2011, the Auxiliary supported Gifford’s Affordable Care Program, providing free and affordable care to patients in need. It fulfilled departments’ “Wish List” requests, bringing added equipment to patients utilizing the lab, Pediatrics, the Emergency Department, Pulmonary and Cardiac Rehabilitation programs, the Bethel and White River Junction health centers and more.

Volunteers gave more than 4,500 hours in 2011 at the Thrift Shop to make that giving possible. Auxiliary board members also give significant time to the non-profit volunteer-run organization.

The reasons why they do this are diverse, but all come down to one main motivation: supporting their community and their community hospital.

South Royalton Band Headlining First Free Concert in Gifford Park

South Royalton Town BandRANDOLPH – The South Royalton Band, often called the South Royalton Town Band, will headline a free community concert at Gifford Medical Center on Wednesday, July 11. The concert is the first public event in Gifford’s new park space since it was completed earlier this year.

Conducted by Dick Ellis, the South Royalton Band plays a mixture of marches, songs from Broadway, novelties, Dixieland music, patriotic numbers and features some soloists.

Marches include the work of American conductor John Philip Sousa, the “March king.” Melodies from such musicals as “The Music Man” and “The Sound of Music” will be heard.

“We try to have enough variety that everyone hears something that they enjoy,” said Ellis, who is in his 68th year of conducting the band and is known as this area’s “music man.”

Comprised of about 30 musicians from around central Vermont, the South Royalton Band is among the few surviving town bands in the region. Ellis credits word of mouth with attracting talent to the band and hard work with keeping it alive.

Ellis has dedicated his life to creating music in central Vermont as the band’s conductor; as the founder of high school bands in Randolph, Bethel, Rochester and his native South Royalton; and through the family business, Ellis Music Co., which supplies about 4,000 instruments to students in 350 Vermont and New Hampshire schools.

“My ambition was to give every youngster in Vermont the opportunity to play an instrument,” Ellis said.

Seven of Ellis’ former high school students still play in the band along with his own son and daughter. The band plays Thursdays on the South Royalton green and around central Vermont.

“I like to promote the arts as much as I can and Randolph for many years has been a place without a park,” he said.

When Gifford Administrator Joseph Woodin started talking about including a park at the hospital, Ellis was immediately interested. It was an opportunity, he said, to support two of his favorite things – the hospital and the arts.

“I was very glad to see something like that happening,” said Ellis, who helped fund the park construction, which was built entirely with donations.

Now Ellis’ band kicks off what the hospital hopes are other community events in the park with a free concert.

“We hope many community members come out to enjoy this new space and the familiar favorite that is the South Royalton Town Band,” said Ashley Lincoln, director of development and public relations at Gifford.

The concert starts at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8:30 p.m. Spectators are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or a blanket, and even a picnic supper. The rain date is Wednesday, July 18. If the weather is questionable, visit www.giffordmed.org on the afternoon of July 11 for an update.

The Gifford park is located between the hospital and the Thrift Shop on South Main Street (Route 12) south of Randolph village. Ample parking is available onsite.