Gifford Capital Campaign Approaches $5 Million Goal

Vision for the Future CampaignRANDOLPH – Vision for the Future, the largest capital campaign in Gifford’s 113-year history, is making a final push to wrap up its $5 million fundraising goal. With just
$397,000 to go, the campaign committee is asking everyone to consider contributing to help raise this final amount.

Silently launched in 2013, the campaign has raised more than $4.6 million to support a 3-phased project: building a new Menig Nursing Home to anchor a senior living community, the creation of private inpatient rooms at the main medical center, and a new, updated Birthing Center.

“Our campaign goal was ambitious, but our vision was as well—to improve our facilities so we can continue to provide the best possible healthcare for future generations in our community, from newborns through old age,” said Gifford’s Development Director Ashley Lincoln. “I’ve been so moved by the hard work of our volunteer campaign steering committee and the generous support we’ve received from our community.”

Lincoln notes that over the course of just one year campaign contributors have been able to see firsthand the impact their gifts have on the lives of their neighbors:

• Residents transitioned into the beautiful new 25-bed Menig Nursing Home in Randolph Center last year and they will celebrate a one-year move-in anniversary in May.

• The hospital opened 25 new private inpatient rooms in December, 2015.

• In June the new Birthing Center will open in a centralized location, with upgrades and four new private rooms overlooking a courtyard garden.

“It is exciting to see that our target is within reach,” Lincoln said. “Our donors’ enthusiasm, and their faith in our stewardship of their gifts, has supported us throughout the entire campaign. We are so close now—I hope people will be inspired to help us wrap up our funding in June.”

For more information about Gifford’s Vision for the Future campaign call Ashley Lincoln at 728-2380 or visit http://www.giffordmed.org/VisionfortheFuture.

Bethel Artist Carla Hodgdon Exhibit at Gifford Gallery

“Fuchsia,” pen and ink drawing by Bethel artist Carla Lamberton Powers Hodgdon.

RANDOLPH – Work by Bethel artist Carla Lamberton Powers Hodgdon is on display through May 25, 2016, in the Gifford Medical Center Art Gallery.

The 36 pieces in this exhibit display work in a variety of mediums, including watercolor, pen and ink, pencil, mixed media, and counted and stamped cross stitch. While she has never taken art classes or received formal training, over the years Hodgdon has turned to
art as a way to relax, especially during the winter months when she is not in the garden. Her mother first introduced her to needlework when she was a child, which led to her interest in cross stitch.

A native Vermonter, Hodgdon has lived and worked in Vermont for all but ten years of her life. She trained as a registered nurse and worked as a public health administrator, retiring from the VT State Department of Health in 2003. While away from Vermont, she served in the Peace Corps, working at the National University of Honduras as an associate professor of Nursing. After returning to the States in 1969, she worked at the Yolo County Health Department just outside Sacramento, CA. She returned to Vermont in 1977, and moved back to her hometown of Bethel in 1983.

Since her retirement she has enjoyed having time to volunteer in community and church activities, to care for extensive perennial flowerbeds, and especially to create art and needlework.

Since her retirement she has enjoyed having time to volunteer in community and church
activities, to care for extensive perennial flowerbeds, and especially to create art and
needlework.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through May 25, 2016.
The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12)
in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

 

Gifford Welcomes Certified Nurse-Midwife Julia Cook

Certified nurse-midwife Julia Cook

RANDOLPH – Certified nurse-midwife Julia Cook has joined Gifford’s team of midwives, and is now seeing patients in our Randolph and Berlin clinics.

Cook received a Master of Science in Nursing from Frontier Nursing University in Hyden, KY. Her clinical interests include adolescent care, patient education, and helping women to be active participants in their ob/gyn care.

Born in rural Louisiana, she moved to a suburb of Atlanta while in High School, and went on to get an associate of Science in Nursing from Georgia Perimeter College. She was first attracted to ob/gyn care after the birth of her first child 16 years ago.

“The midwives who cared for me were amazing—they empowered me as a woman and as a new mother,” she said. “I was intrigued by what they did, and asked them what I needed to do to start on that career path.”

When Cook finished her training she began to look for work in a smaller community, and was drawn by the story of Gifford’s Birthing Center and its pioneering efforts in family centered birth. She also appreciates that her work will include opportunities for well-women and adolescent care.

“I feel that education is so important when it comes to women’s health,” she said. “I especially enjoy working with adolescents because they are at a time in life when information about how to be healthy is taken with them as they transition into adulthood.”

Cook says her husband and four children are also excited about moving to New England, and the family looks forward to living in a smaller community and exploring all the new things Vermont offers.

To schedule an appointment, or to learn more about Gifford’s Birthing Center, please call 802-728-2401.

Rochester Welcomes Dr. Erwin Lange to Community’s Health Center

Gifford Medical Center

Photo: Dr. Erwin Lange (right) with Rochester Health Center Office Manager Dawn Beriau (left) and Registered Nurse Gail Proctor.

Dr. Erwin Lange has joined Gifford’s Primary Care team and is seeing patients at the Rochester Health Center. He started in Rochester as a locum in November, 2015 and has now settled in full-time as the community’s primary care provider. Lange brings many years of medical experience to his patients. He received a BA from Dartmouth College, a MD from the Brown Alpert Medical School in Providence RI, and completed a three year residency in family practice at the St. Joseph Hospital Health Center in Syracuse, NY.

Board certified in Family Practice, he began his career as a family practitioner in a rural community in New York State before moving into practice as an emergency physician in several NH and Vermont hospitals. When he decided to return to family medicine he was looking for a rural community like Rochester, where he could care for a variety of conditions but also establish ongoing relationships with patients.

Office Manager Dawn Beriau and Registered Nurse Gail Proctor have worked at the clinic for more than 30 years and are introducing him to local families, many who have been receiving primary care at the Health Center for generations. Lange says he really has appreciated how welcoming the Rochester community has been during his first months here. “Rochester really is an amazing community,” he said. “Sometimes people have stopped in just to introduce themselves and visit, and that has been great!”

The Rochester Health Center opened in 1976 and provides family and internal (adult) medicine in a convenient location at 235 Main Street. Dr. Lange sees patients at the center from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and Physician Assistant Tammy Gerdes sees patients on Fridays. Services include: annual physicals, blood work, sick visits, EKGs, chronic disease management, care coordination, and emergency procedures. To schedule an appointment call 802-767-3704.

Gifford Primary Care Team Welcomes Dr. Kasra Djalayer

Gifford Medica Center

Dr. Kasra Djalayer

Dr. Kasra Djalayer has joined Gifford Health Care’s primary care team and is now seeing patients in the Berlin and Randolph clinics. He also sees Gifford patients at the Rowan Court Nursing Home in Barre, where he is the Medical Director.

Board-certified in internal medicine, Dr. Djalayer received his license of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Complutenese (Madrid, Spain). He completed his residency at the Yale-Griffin Hospital Prevention Research Center and did post graduate training in Obesity at Harvard University and in Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology at the University of Vermont. His clinical interests include dementia-related behavioral disorders, geriatric medicine, and rheumatology.

Most recently he has worked at Franklin Regional Hospital (Franklin, NH) and as a hospitalist at the New London Hospital (New London, NH), and the Brattleboro Memorial Hospital (Brattleboro, VT).  “Dr. DJ,” as he is known to his patients, has received both the Patients Choice Award and the Compassionate Doctor recognition for five consecutive years (2000-2014).

“I like to use humor in my conversations, and find it energizing to build ongoing relationships with patients,” he said. “We talk about the details of their medical problem but also about their situation in general—any family issues or other concerns. It’s an important part of good care.”

When not working, Dr. Djalayer enjoys cycling, tennis, swimming, and reading to keep up with current events and new medical developments.

Gifford 108th Annual Meeting Paints Strong Picture of Uniquely Successful Small Hospital

Gifford Administrator Joe Woodin

Joseph Woodin, Gifford’s administrator, speaks at Saturday’s Annual Meeting of the medical center’s corporators. Woodin outlined a year of success.

If there was any doubt that Randolph’s local hospital – Gifford – stands above when it comes to commitment to community and financial stability, it was wholly erased Saturday as the medical center held its 108th Annual Meeting of its corporators.

The evening gathering at Gifford featured an overview of the hospital’s successful past year, news of spectacular community outreach efforts, a video detailing employees’ commitment to caring for their neighbors and a ringing endorsement from Al Gobeille, chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board and the evening’s guest speaker.

Diane and William Brigham, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting

Diane and William Brigham, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting.

For Gifford, 2013 brought a 14th consecutive year “making” budget and operating margin, new providers, expanded services including urology and wound care, expanded facilities in Sharon and Randolph, a designation as a Federally Qualified Health Center and all permits needed to move forward on the construction of a senior living community in Randolph Center and private inpatient rooms at Gifford.

The Randolph medical center also collected a ranking as the state’s most energy efficient hospital, an award for pediatrician Dr. Lou DiNicola, national recognition for Outstanding Senior Volunteer Major Melvin McLaughlin of Randolph and, noted Board Chairman Gus Meyer, continued national accolades for the Menig Extended Care Facility nursing home.

Al Gobeille

Al Gobeille, chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board, speaks at Gifford’s 108th annual corporators meeting on Saturday evening at the Randolph hospital.

“In the meantime, we’re faced with an ever-changing health care landscape,” said Meyer, listing accountable care organizations, payment reform initiatives and a burgeoning number of small hospitals forming relationships with the region’s two large tertiary care centers.

For some small hospitals, these shifts cause “angst.” “We like to think it brings us possibility,” said Meyer. “As both a Critical Access Hospital and now a Federally Qualified Health Center, Gifford is particularly well positioned to sustain our health as an organization and continue to fulfill our vital role in enhancing the health of the communities we serve.”

Joan Granter and Irene Schaefer

Joan Granter, left, and Irene Schaefer, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting.

The FQHC designation brings an increased emphasis on preventative care and will allow Gifford to invest in needed dental and mental health care in the community, Administrator Joseph Woodin said.

Gifford is but one of only three hospitals in the country to now be both a Critical Access Hospital and Federally Qualified Health Center.

“Congratulations! You’re a visionary,” said Gobeille in addressing Gifford’s new FQHC status. “It’s a brilliant move. It’s a great way to do the right thing.”

And Gifford is doing the right thing.

Gobeille was clear in his praise for Gifford’s management team and its commitment to stable budgets, without layoffs or compromising patient care.

Community investment

Marjorie and Dick Drysdale

Marjorie and Dick Drysdale, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting.

Gifford’s commitment also extends to the community.

In a major announcement, Woodin shared that thanks to the William and Mary Markle Community Foundation, Gifford will grant a total of $25,000 to schools in 10 area towns to support exercise and healthy eating programs.

Gifford annually at this time of year also hands out a grant and scholarship. The 2014 Philip Levesque grant in the amount of $1,000 was awarded to the Orange County Parent Child Center. The 2014 Richard J. Barrett, M.D., scholarship was awarded to Genia Schumacher, a mother of seven and breast cancer survivor who is in her second year of the radiology program at Champlain College.

The continued use of “Gifford Gift Certificates,” encouraging local spending during the holiday, invested about $40,000 in the regional economy in December. “These small stores appreciate it. It really does make a difference,” noted Woodin, who also detailed Gifford’s buy local approach and many community outreach activities in 2013, including free health fairs and classes.

The community in turn has invested in Gifford. The medical center’s 120 volunteers gave 16,678 hours in 2013, or 2,085 eight-hour workdays. Thrift Shop volunteers gave another 6,489 hours, or 811 workdays. And the Auxiliary, which operates the popular Thrift Shop, has both invested in equipment for various Gifford departments and made a major contribution toward the planned senior living community that will begin construction in May.

Elections

David and Peggy Ainsworth

Outgoing Gifford board member David Ainsworth arrives with wife Peggy to Saturday’s 108th Annual Meeting of the Corporators.

The night also brought new members to the Gifford family.

Corporators elected two new of their own: Matt Considine of Randolph and Jody Richards of Bethel. Considine, the director of investments for the State of Vermont, was also elected to the Board of Trustees and Lincoln Clark of Royalton was re-elected.

Leaving the board after six years was Sharon Dimmick of Randolph Center, a past chairwoman, and David Ainsworth of South Royalton after nine years.

‘Recipe for Success’

“Recipe for Success” was the night’s theme and built around a fresh-off-the-press 2013 Annual Report sharing patient accounts of Gifford staff members going above and beyond. The report, now available on www.giffordmed.org, credits employees’ strong commitment to patient-care as helping the medical center succeed.

Taking the message one step further, Gifford unveiled a new video with staff members talking about the privilege of providing local care and the medical center’s diverse services, particularly its emphasis on primary care. The video is also on the hospital’s Web site.

David Ainsworth and Sharon Dimmick

Gus Meyer, chairman of Gifford’s board, honors retiring board members David Ainsworth and Sharon Dimmick.

Health care reform
Shifting resources to primary and preventative care is a key to health care reform initiatives, said a personable and humorous Gobeille, who emphasized affordability.

“We all want care. We just have to be able to afford care,” he said. “In the two-and-a-half years I’ve been on the board, I’ve grown an optimism that Vermont could do something profound.”

Gobeille described what he called “two Vermonts” – one where large companies providing their employees more affordable insurance and one where small businesses and individuals struggle to pay high costs. “The Affordable Care Act tries to fix that,” he said.

The role his board is playing in the initiatives in Vermont is one of a regulator over hospital budgets and the certificate of need process, one as innovator of pilot projects aimed at redefining how health care is delivered, and paid for, and as an evaluator of the success of these initiatives as well as the administration and legislators’ efforts to move toward a single-payer system.

Audience members asked questions about when a financing plan for a single-payer system would be forthcoming (after the election, Gobeille said), about how costs can be reduced without personal accountability from individuals for their health (personal accountability absolutely matters, he said) and how small hospitals can keep the doors open.

Gobeille pointed to Gifford’s record of financial success and working for the best interests of patients and communities as keys. “I don’t think Gifford’s future is in peril as long as you have a great management team, and you do,” Gobeille said.

National Severe Weather Preparedness Week is March 2-8

National Severe Weather Preparedness WeekEach year, too many people are killed or seriously injured by severe weather, despite advance warning. In 2012, more than 450 people in the United States were killed and more than 2,600 were seriously injured by severe weather. Seven events in 2013 accounted for losses over $1 billion each, with loss of lives and serious injuries.

Preparing for severe weather doesn’t have to be complicated or expensive.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) will highlight the importance of preparing for severe weather before it strikes during National Severe Weather Preparedness Week, March 2-8, 2014. They ask that you “Be a Force of Nature” by knowing your risk, taking action, and being an example where you live.

Know Your Risk: Identify and understand the types of hazardous weather that can impact where you work and live. Here in New England, we can have severe winter weather, including snow, ice, wind, and cold. Rain/thunder storms, flooding, hurricanes, tornadoes, hot weather, and drought are also likely events.

Take Action: Bookmark weather.gov to get the latest forecast information. Obtain a NOAA weather radio; there are affordable models that run on AC, battery, solar, and/or hand crank power. Learn about Wireless Emergency Alerts (see below). Create or update your family emergency plan and disaster supplies kit(s).

Be an Example: Tell your friends and family what you have done to be “weather-ready.” Share your preparedness story on Facebook. Tweet your preparedness with hashtag #ImaForce.

Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA): WEA are emergency messages sent by authorized alerting authorities through your mobile carrier. Alerts will include extreme weather alerts, local emergencies requiring evacuation or immediate action, AMBER alerts, and Presidential alerts during a national emergency. It will have a special tone and vibration, both repeated twice, and will look like a text message. The message will show the type of alert, the time of the alert, any action you should take, and the issuing agency. The message will be no more than 90 characters. Most newer devices are WEA capable; some older ones are not WEA capable. For more information on devices and carriers visit: www.ctia.org/wea. WEA messages are offered for free by the wireless carriers; you will not be charged for them and they will not count toward limits on your plan. You are not being tracked; messages are broadcast from cell towers in the areas of the threat. Even if you are not in your home area, you will get the alert. Likewise, if you enter an area of alert, you will receive it when you enter the area. WEA messages are not affected by network congestion.

Preparing for severe weather will also help prepare you and your family for other emergency events, whether they are climate-related, technological, or terrorism. Any degree of preparedness is beneficial. The more prepared you are, the better off you’ll be and the more likely you can be part of the solution instead of part of the burden. For every dollar spent for preparedness, statistics show $7 is saved. Information on emergency preparedness can be obtained from the American Red Cross, FEMA, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Vermont Division of Emergency Management and Homeland Security (VT DEMHS), formerly Vermont Emergency Management (VEM), and others.

Brad Salzmann is an orthopedics physician assistant at Gifford in Randolph. He also has a master’s degree in disaster medicine and management, and serves as part of the national Disaster Medical Assistance Team based in Worcester, Mass.

Gifford holding Heartsaver CPR certification course

Blueprint Community Health Team now certified to offer American Heart Association courses

Gifford Medical CenterRANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center’s Blueprint Community Health Team is offering a Heartsaver CPR certification course to the public for the first time.

The course will be held Oct. 15 from 6-8 p.m. in the Randolph hospital’s conference center. Register by Oct. 4 by calling Keith Marino at 728-2499.

Participants will receive hands on training in CPR for infants, children and adults and rescue breathing. The course is designed to provide anyone with the basic skills needed to keep someone alive in the event that his or her breathing or heartbeat has stopped.

“Knowledge is a very important part of being a concerned citizen,” says Marino, a member of Gifford’s Blueprint team, a certified American Heart Association CPR instructor and an emergency medical technician. “If you come upon someone having a heart attack or with a blocked airway, knowing CPR will assist you in saving that person’s life.”

All are welcome to the course. However, space is limited to 12 participants.

Gifford is on Route 12, or 44 South Main Street in Randolph. From South Main Street take Maple Street to the patient parking area. The Conference Center is marked with a green awning or for handicapped accessibility use the main entrance and take the elevator to the first floor.

Learn more online at www.giffordmed.org. Like Gifford on Facebook to receive notifications of classes like these.

Gifford Offering Free Medicare Talk

stethoscope

© Jonoman1 | Dreamstime Stock Photos & Stock Free Images

RANDOLPH – For more than 40 million Americans, Medicare provides their health insurance. Across the nation and here in Vermont, more Americans become eligible each day, leaving big questions about the federal insurance program and just what it covers.

Gifford Medical Center is aiming to help answer some of those questions for its employees and the public in a free talk this April.

MedicareReady or Not … ” is being held on April 11 from 6-7 p.m. in the Randolph hospital’s Conference Center. The talk will feature a presentation from Acadia Benefits Inc. health insurance specialist Scott McKee on Medicare parts A through D, eligibility and resources. Continue reading

Gifford Shares Achievements, Plans

Gifford logo

Annual Corporators Meeting postponed

RANDOLPH – Each March Gifford Medical Center’s corporators gather to review the year past. This year, the 107th Annual Meeting of the Gifford Corporators has been postponed, but the hospital did not want to delay in sharing a few of 2012’s many successes and some plans for the future.

The meeting will be rescheduled, allowing for corporators to hold their annual business meeting, elect new board members and discuss health care reform.

Year in review

The end of the 2012 fiscal year marked another year “in the black” for Gifford. This is the 13thconsecutive year the medical center has achieved both its budget and operating margin – a feat unheard of at other Vermont hospitals.

The year also brought numerous awards and recognitions for the medical center. The Vermont House of Representatives honored Gifford with a legislative resolution of support and thanks. The Robin’s Nest Child Enrichment Center, Gifford’s day care, once again earned five STARS from the Vermont STep Ahead Recognition System.

The Menig Extended Care Facility nursing home was named a 2012 Best Nursing Home and an Honor Roll nursing home by U.S. News and World Report – the latter naming it one of the best 39 nursing homes in the country. (Menig just last month earned a 2013 Best Nursing Home recognition once again). Menig also received the state’s Nursing Home Quality Recognition.

The March of Dimes recognized Gifford with a Leadership Legacy award for its commitment to prenatal, birth and newborn care. Long-time pediatrician Dr. Lou DiNicola was recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the first-ever “CDC Childhood Immunization Champion” for the state of Vermont. Gifford was awarded a Hospital of Choice Award from The American Alliance of Healthcare Providers for courtesy and compassion.

Continue reading