A Spoonful of Listening: Physical Therapy

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Michael Blood

Michael Blood and physical therapist Amy Chiriatti

After undergoing double knee replacement surgery at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Michael Blood, 66, of White River Junction had rehabilitation with physical therapist Amy Chiriatti at Advance Physical Therapy in Wilder. Amy provided the “exceptional” care to not just Michael’s knees but to him as a whole person.

“I’ve never had anyone in the medical field I can talk to one-on-one. She’s an excellent listener. She’s just a special person; she really is.”         ~ Michael Blood

Gifford physical therapy

A Generous Sprinkling of Knowledge: New Parents Support Group

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Nancy Clark

Childbirth educator Nancy Clark and babies

Nancy Clark has a diverse role. She is a care manager, nurse, lactation consultant and certified childbirth educator. She helps new moms with breast feeding, organizes trainings for new families, occasionally does home visits for families with special needs and leads a free New Parents Support Group for two hours each Wednesday. Since its inception, the New Parents Group, with Nancy at its helm, has been a cherished resource for new moms and dads.

“Nancy is awesome. She’s very supportive and very knowledgeable. She makes it easier to navigate all of the perils of being a new mom. Nancy calmly validates your thoughts as a mother.”
~ Julia O’Brien

generous sprinkling of knowledge

An Extra Push: Housekeeping

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Kelly Bouchard

Barb Reynolds, housekeeping associate Kelly Bouchard and Della Allen

Barb Reynolds sometimes likes an extra push – in her wheelchair that is. As a member of the Environmental Services team, Kelly Bouchard’s job is to clean the nursing home and residents’ rooms. But in this culture of caring, Kelly doesn’t stop there. Walk down the halls or visit at a meal time and Kelly is often found sitting with residents, including Barb and her mom Della Allen, asking about their day and reminiscing about the good old days. Kelly is so involved, she was asked to join the nursing home’s “Falls Committee” to help prevent resident falls. And, of course, she gives Barb a push now and then.

“She’s very good. She takes me up and down the hall, when she doesn’t need to; it’s not her job… She’s very broad-minded. She’s willing to do things for other people.”
~ Barb Reynolds

an extra push

One Bowl (Me Over) of Laughter: Pulmonary Rehabilitation

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Stephannie Welch

Respiratory therapist Stephannie Welch and Tim Leno

Tim Leno of Graniteville has Stage 3 COPD. This summer he drove three times a week to Gifford to build his tolerance to exercise and get fit as part of the Pulmonary Rehabilitation Program at Gifford. The program is a place where laughter often rings out, in part due to the good humor of respiratory therapist Stephannie Welch and patients like Tim.

“I try to find some humor in every situation and laugh my way through life. Sometimes that is di‡ffcult but not at Giff‰ord Pulmonary Rehab. Stephannie was the perfect foil for some of my jokes, helping me set up for the punchline. She was a great sport and she can give as good as she takes.”
~ Tim Leno

Two Cups of Comfort: Diagnostic Imaging and Inpatient Care

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Ben Cronan

Radiology technologist Ben Cronan, Donna Baker and nurse Shane Parks

Donna Baker is a cancer and MRSA survivor. Unable to walk, she also has COPD. These conditions have meant considerable hospital time for Donna. Of her time spent at Gifford, two faces are particularly memorable: inpatient nurse Shane Parks and radiology technologist Ben Cronan.

“Shane is a very good nurse. He’s very thorough and you feel confident when you’re with him … . When I would have trouble breathing, it would scare me and he would stay there until I calmed down.”

“Ben, I pick on him. When I would need chest X-rays, I would be on a stretcher. He would get right on up on the stretcher. He would like give me a hug around my arms and pull me forward, so (an image receptor could be placed under) me.”
~ Donna Baker

One Heaping Teaspoon of Heart: Cardiac Rehabilitation

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Janet Kittredge

Janet Kittredge and cardiac rehabilitation nurse Annette Petrucelli

After having a stent placed in her heart, Janet Kittredge of Hancock did cardiac rehabilitation at Gifford. She was nervous to start, and then reluctant to leave.

“I love those ladies. They became friends and I couldn’t wait to get back to see them. I just thought they were such happy, positive people. They had (us) all feeling motivated and they made (us) all feel safe and secure … . We talked about all kinds of personal things. It was really fun. Anyone who was there was glad to come back and in no hurry to leave.”
~ Janet Kittredge

Sprinkle on Support: Nutrition Counseling

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Cindy Legacy

Cindy Legacy and dietitian Stacy Pelletier

For six months leading up to her bariatric surgery, Cindy Legacy of Randolph met with registered dietitian Stacy Pelletier and has kept in touch in person and via e-mail since. Cindy lost 30 pounds before her surgery and another 80 pounds since, for a total 110 pounds of weight loss. More importantly, she experienced a major improvement in her
health, in part thanks to Stacy’s continued help.

“She is a wonderful, wonderful , wonderful support person. I wanted to succeed. She wanted me to succeed. She listened to what I had to say and made me feel like she really cared about what I was trying to do. There was no judgment. She’s like a security blanket. I can go and say, ‘What do I do?’”
~ Cindy Legacy

One Cup of Sugar: Primary Care

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

one cup of sugar

When Donna Shephard of Rochester came with her husband, Dick, for an appointment at Gifford primary care on her 72nd birthday in April, nurse Dorothy Jamieson had cake, cupcakes, a crown and lei waiting as a surprise. Donna, who has Parkison’s and regularly visits Gifford, was appreciative of the birthday surprise but more so of the care that Dot
routinely provides.

“I love her. She’s the best nurse that you (could) ever see. You don’t get them like that. She’s so gentle and nice and friendly. She puts a smile on anyone’s face.”
~ Donna Shepard

Donna Shephard

Nurse Dorothy Jamieson with Dick and Donna Shepard

Gifford 108th Annual Meeting Paints Strong Picture of Uniquely Successful Small Hospital

Gifford Administrator Joe Woodin

Joseph Woodin, Gifford’s administrator, speaks at Saturday’s Annual Meeting of the medical center’s corporators. Woodin outlined a year of success.

If there was any doubt that Randolph’s local hospital – Gifford – stands above when it comes to commitment to community and financial stability, it was wholly erased Saturday as the medical center held its 108th Annual Meeting of its corporators.

The evening gathering at Gifford featured an overview of the hospital’s successful past year, news of spectacular community outreach efforts, a video detailing employees’ commitment to caring for their neighbors and a ringing endorsement from Al Gobeille, chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board and the evening’s guest speaker.

Diane and William Brigham, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting

Diane and William Brigham, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting.

For Gifford, 2013 brought a 14th consecutive year “making” budget and operating margin, new providers, expanded services including urology and wound care, expanded facilities in Sharon and Randolph, a designation as a Federally Qualified Health Center and all permits needed to move forward on the construction of a senior living community in Randolph Center and private inpatient rooms at Gifford.

The Randolph medical center also collected a ranking as the state’s most energy efficient hospital, an award for pediatrician Dr. Lou DiNicola, national recognition for Outstanding Senior Volunteer Major Melvin McLaughlin of Randolph and, noted Board Chairman Gus Meyer, continued national accolades for the Menig Extended Care Facility nursing home.

Al Gobeille

Al Gobeille, chairman of the Green Mountain Care Board, speaks at Gifford’s 108th annual corporators meeting on Saturday evening at the Randolph hospital.

“In the meantime, we’re faced with an ever-changing health care landscape,” said Meyer, listing accountable care organizations, payment reform initiatives and a burgeoning number of small hospitals forming relationships with the region’s two large tertiary care centers.

For some small hospitals, these shifts cause “angst.” “We like to think it brings us possibility,” said Meyer. “As both a Critical Access Hospital and now a Federally Qualified Health Center, Gifford is particularly well positioned to sustain our health as an organization and continue to fulfill our vital role in enhancing the health of the communities we serve.”

Joan Granter and Irene Schaefer

Joan Granter, left, and Irene Schaefer, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting.

The FQHC designation brings an increased emphasis on preventative care and will allow Gifford to invest in needed dental and mental health care in the community, Administrator Joseph Woodin said.

Gifford is but one of only three hospitals in the country to now be both a Critical Access Hospital and Federally Qualified Health Center.

“Congratulations! You’re a visionary,” said Gobeille in addressing Gifford’s new FQHC status. “It’s a brilliant move. It’s a great way to do the right thing.”

And Gifford is doing the right thing.

Gobeille was clear in his praise for Gifford’s management team and its commitment to stable budgets, without layoffs or compromising patient care.

Community investment

Marjorie and Dick Drysdale

Marjorie and Dick Drysdale, corporators, arrive at Gifford’s 108th Annual Meeting.

Gifford’s commitment also extends to the community.

In a major announcement, Woodin shared that thanks to the William and Mary Markle Community Foundation, Gifford will grant a total of $25,000 to schools in 10 area towns to support exercise and healthy eating programs.

Gifford annually at this time of year also hands out a grant and scholarship. The 2014 Philip Levesque grant in the amount of $1,000 was awarded to the Orange County Parent Child Center. The 2014 Richard J. Barrett, M.D., scholarship was awarded to Genia Schumacher, a mother of seven and breast cancer survivor who is in her second year of the radiology program at Champlain College.

The continued use of “Gifford Gift Certificates,” encouraging local spending during the holiday, invested about $40,000 in the regional economy in December. “These small stores appreciate it. It really does make a difference,” noted Woodin, who also detailed Gifford’s buy local approach and many community outreach activities in 2013, including free health fairs and classes.

The community in turn has invested in Gifford. The medical center’s 120 volunteers gave 16,678 hours in 2013, or 2,085 eight-hour workdays. Thrift Shop volunteers gave another 6,489 hours, or 811 workdays. And the Auxiliary, which operates the popular Thrift Shop, has both invested in equipment for various Gifford departments and made a major contribution toward the planned senior living community that will begin construction in May.

Elections

David and Peggy Ainsworth

Outgoing Gifford board member David Ainsworth arrives with wife Peggy to Saturday’s 108th Annual Meeting of the Corporators.

The night also brought new members to the Gifford family.

Corporators elected two new of their own: Matt Considine of Randolph and Jody Richards of Bethel. Considine, the director of investments for the State of Vermont, was also elected to the Board of Trustees and Lincoln Clark of Royalton was re-elected.

Leaving the board after six years was Sharon Dimmick of Randolph Center, a past chairwoman, and David Ainsworth of South Royalton after nine years.

‘Recipe for Success’

“Recipe for Success” was the night’s theme and built around a fresh-off-the-press 2013 Annual Report sharing patient accounts of Gifford staff members going above and beyond. The report, now available on www.giffordmed.org, credits employees’ strong commitment to patient-care as helping the medical center succeed.

Taking the message one step further, Gifford unveiled a new video with staff members talking about the privilege of providing local care and the medical center’s diverse services, particularly its emphasis on primary care. The video is also on the hospital’s Web site.

David Ainsworth and Sharon Dimmick

Gus Meyer, chairman of Gifford’s board, honors retiring board members David Ainsworth and Sharon Dimmick.

Health care reform
Shifting resources to primary and preventative care is a key to health care reform initiatives, said a personable and humorous Gobeille, who emphasized affordability.

“We all want care. We just have to be able to afford care,” he said. “In the two-and-a-half years I’ve been on the board, I’ve grown an optimism that Vermont could do something profound.”

Gobeille described what he called “two Vermonts” – one where large companies providing their employees more affordable insurance and one where small businesses and individuals struggle to pay high costs. “The Affordable Care Act tries to fix that,” he said.

The role his board is playing in the initiatives in Vermont is one of a regulator over hospital budgets and the certificate of need process, one as innovator of pilot projects aimed at redefining how health care is delivered, and paid for, and as an evaluator of the success of these initiatives as well as the administration and legislators’ efforts to move toward a single-payer system.

Audience members asked questions about when a financing plan for a single-payer system would be forthcoming (after the election, Gobeille said), about how costs can be reduced without personal accountability from individuals for their health (personal accountability absolutely matters, he said) and how small hospitals can keep the doors open.

Gobeille pointed to Gifford’s record of financial success and working for the best interests of patients and communities as keys. “I don’t think Gifford’s future is in peril as long as you have a great management team, and you do,” Gobeille said.