Bethel Artist Janet Hayward Burnham Coming to Gifford Gallery

Bethel acrylic artist Janet Hayward Burnham

“Long May She Wave” is one of Bethel acrylic artist Janet Hayward Burnham’s pieces in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery in Randolph from May 28 through June 25.

Artist and author Janet Hayward Burnham brings her acrylic and pen and ink works to the Gifford Medical Center art gallery from May 28 through June 25.

Burnham, now of Bethel, was born in Indiana, but never lived there. She went on to live in nine other states, attending 14 schools from kindergarten through college.

Burnham came to Vermont in 1968 with her husband and four children. They bought a farm in the Champlain Valley in Orwell, where Burnham taught art for a number of years and also wrote for Vermont Life.

Burnham was 42 when she graduated with a bachelor’s in fine arts from Castleton State College in 1979. “ … my two teenaged daughters – seated in the crowd – made me grin when they cheered as my name was called out at the graduation ceremonies,” Burnham recalls.

Art was Burnham’s first love.

“I think I’ve loved the art of making art since I picked up my first crayon,” she says. “Art was always my favorite class, bar none … even better than recess.”

She added the written word to her list of loves, and talents, in college.

Castleton was Burnham’s third college. Earlier at Columbia University in New York City in the late 1950s, while married and pregnant, an English professor first brought to light Burnham’s talent. He tasked the class with a first writing assignment. “When he passed the papers back two weeks later, he said we had all done fairly well, but there was one that was so outstanding, he was going to read it to the class. When he began reading, I was absolutely dumbfounded. It was mine. In all those schools I had attended – and some were excellent private schools – nobody ever told me I had a gift for working with words,” Burnham recalls.

“I now had two creative loves – art and the art of words.”

A poetry book Burnham wrote and illustrated, “A Week Ago Cat,” is the combination of those two loves.

Her show features illustrations and poems from the children’s book as well as other more adult pieces, and the book will be for sale in Gifford’s Gift Shop.

In addition to her book of poems, Burnham has been published in Yankee, Grit, The Boston Globe, The New York Daily News, Country Journal, Instructor, The Rutland Business Journal, The Herald of Randolph, and Woman’s World. She also penned two novels published in the United Kingdom that went on to editions in Sweden, Norway and the United States.

More recently, she helped research and was the lone writer of a book for The Bethel Historical Society titled “Vermont’s Elusive Architect George H. Guernsey.”

See Burnham’s unique art in the Gifford Galley. The show is free and open to the public. The Gifford Gallery is just inside the main entrance of the Randolph hospital at 44 S. Main St. Call Gifford at (802) 728-2324 for more information.

Randolph Couple Brings Images of Southwest to Gifford Gallery

Arny and Cil Spahn have long background in photography

Arny and Cil Spahn

As they prepare to hang their exhibit in the Gifford Medical Center gallery, Arnold and Priscilla Spahn hold up photos they took in the Southwest. Priscilla’s photo is of a Navajo weaver in Gouldings, Utah. Arny holds a photo of what is known as “the left mitten” in Monument Valley, Utah.

Randolph couple Arnold “Arny” and Priscilla “Cil” Spahn present images of their travels to the Southwest in a joint photography exhibit at Gifford Medical Center March 26 through April 30.

The Spahns have been taking photographs since they were very young; Cil since she was 7 and Arny since age 9.

Born in Providence, R.I., Arny joined the U.S. Air Force at age 18 and then went on to work in Danbury, Conn., building high voltage test equipment. It was there that his talents in photography were recognized, and Arny became the company photographer and also technical writer.

Cil was raised in Connecticut and as a teenager won a number of awards for her photography. When the photography teacher at her high school became ill, Cil was asked to step in. At age 16, she did black and white photofinishing at a local camera shop and took photographs to accompany an article submitted to a national architectural magazine. She says she often wondered if the magazine editors knew the photographer was a teen.
In college at Skidmore, she both photographed and wrote for the school paper, moving up to managing editor her senior year.

Cil and Arny met volunteering as “flaggers,” or safety workers, at race tracks with the New England Region Sports Car Club of America. Cil was one of the first women course workers at tracks in Lime Rock, Conn., and Sebring, Fla.

A photography course in South Woodstock at the Doscher Country School of Photography paid for courtesy of Arny’s GI Bill of Rights first brought the couple to Vermont in 1971. Inspired by the course and the Green Mountain State, they settled in Vermont and opened a photography business first in Brookfield and then in Randolph, Bridge Hill Studio, running it together until retiring in 1997.

As part of their business, they rejoined the sports car racing world as licensed freelance photographers, taking and selling thousands of action photographs to racers and publications. They are also both past presidents of the Vermont and New England Professional Photographers Association and were both trustees of the New England Institute of Professional Photography.

Today, they are active in their community as board members of the Randolph Rotary, The Clara Martin Center and The Citizens Advisory Board for Reparative Justice.

A hobbyist woodworker, or wood turner, Arny continues to write and photograph for The Woodchuck Woodturners of Northern Vermont as their newsletter editor.

The couple also enjoys traveling, specifically Elderhostel or Road Scholar educational tours. They have been taking the tours since they retired almost two decades ago. A recent trip took them to Arizona, Utah and New Mexico, where they visited scenes from Tony Hillerman’s fictional stories of Navajo people. Those scenes from the Southwest make up their exhibit at Gifford.

“What we fell in love with about the Hillerman Country was the Navajo’s basic desire to be in harmony with their world. It’s a concept they call ‘hozho,’ and in their prayers, they ask only to walk in beauty. When you travel through much of Arizona, Utah and New Mexico, physical beauty is all around you,” notes the couple in a write-up on its trip, displayed as part of the exhibit.

The exhibit is free and open to the public. The Gifford gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 or Volunteer Coordinator Julie Fischer at (802) 728-2324 for more information.

‘Penguins, Polar Bears and Kodiak Cubs’ in Gifford Gallery

Gifford gallery

Polar bear lazing around (photo provided)

Rochester’s Barb DeHart is quick to sidestep the title “photographer,” but that doesn’t mean she won’t capture your eye.

DeHart is a retired business owner. She had a company that manufactured equipment for the electronics industry for three decades in Burlington, Mass. She retired to Rochester, Vt., and following the death of her husband in 1999 began investing more time in traveling.

“The photography sort of came along secondary,” says DeHart, who with little more than a basic point-and-shoot camera captured penguins on the Falkland Islands of Antarctica, polar bears in the Arctic Circle in Norway and on the Hudson Bay in Manitoba, Canada, and brown Kodiak bears and cubs in Alaska.

Gifford gallery

Unexpected visitor (photo provided)

DeHart brought the images of never-seen-in-Vermont, frolicking wildlife home, printed them and hung them on her wall.

Friends took one look and encouraged her to do more with the stunning images.

Last fall, some of her works were part of the Middlebury Arts Walk.

Still DeHart downplays them.

“I’m not a professional at all. My byline is ‘Photos for Fun.’ It’s just to make people smile,” she says self-consciously.

Her nerves stem from presenting her works for the first time in a gallery show. Beginning Wednesday afternoon, DeHart’s images of penguins, polar bears and Kodiak cubs will be in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery in Randolph.

Gifford gallery

Cubs playing (photo provided)

The show runs two months, until March 26, and is free and open to the public.

“It’s kind of overwhelming,” says DeHart, who in her regular life is a Rochester Budget and Finance Committee member, chairwoman of the Trustees of Public Funds and a justice of the peace.

Going forward, DeHart will continue to travel. She has a trip planned that will mean seeing more polar bears. And she will continue to take photos.

“It’s become a new hobby. Maybe it will become an avocation. But it’s been fun,” DeHart says.

Join the fun. See her show “Penguins, Polar Bears and Kodiak Cubs” from Jan. 29-March 26 at Gifford. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 or Volunteer Coordinator Julie Fischer at (802) 728-2324 for more information.

Evolving Photographer Ken Goss in Gifford Gallery Wednesday

photographer Ken Goss

Photographs like this one, “Cascading Serenity,” taken in Berlin, Vt., are among the diverse works by experienced photographer Ken Goss of Randolph on display in the Gifford Gallery from Nov. 27 through Jan. 29. (Photo provided)

Ken Goss spent a career in precision aerial photography.

It was business.

In his retirement, he makes art – art that will be on display in the Gifford Medical Center gallery from Nov. 27 through Jan. 29.

The show is an eclectic mix of landscapes, still life and portraits, and is the latest from this evolving and popular local photographer.

Goss was first introduced to photography in high school, but the majority of his photography training came during his military career. “After I enlisted in the Marine Corps, I went through naval photo school in Pensacola, Fla., for aerial reconnaissance and photo interpretation,” Goss says. “Two years later I went through advanced 70 mm photo school at the naval air station in Jacksonville, Fla.”

After the military, Goss went on to work in both freelance photography and in a commercial studio for a short time. The bulk of his career, though, was in precision aerial photography, topographic mapping and aerial survey first with a civil engineering company on Long Island, N.Y., and then for his own business, Aerial Photo and Survey Corp., also on Long Island. He worked in the field for more than 40 years.

photographer Ken Goss

“Violin & Rose” is a still life by Randolph photographer Ken Goss that appears in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery beginning Wednesday afternoon. (Photo provided)

Along the way he had some remarkable accomplishments, including assisting the nation’s space program. He helped develop applied aerial photographic techniques for use in flight training simulators under contract to NASA and was a team member in the development of the original “Luna model” in the Apollo program.

Goss retired in the 1990s and moved to Vermont in 2003.

Since he’s worked as the chair of the Chandler Art Gallery from 2006 to 2008, has taught the basics of black and white photography at the White River Craft Center since 2009 and shown his works around the region.

“Now being again able to pursue photography as an ‘art’ form, I try to take what I feel in my heart or in spirit about a subject, capture it in film (or digitally) and print in such a manner to give the viewer the same feeling,” Goss says. “This transference of feelings, if successful, gives me all the satisfaction of the art that I need.”

To see Goss’ art, visit the Gifford Gallery. It is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 or Volunteer Coordinator Julie Fischer at (802) 728-2324 for more information, or visit www.giffordmed.org.

Watercolors by Greg Crawford Now in Gifford Gallery

watercolor paintingDetailed and gorgeous watercolors by Stockbridge’s Greg Crawford fill the walls of the Gifford Gallery now until Sept. 25.

Crawford is a self-taught artist who has been a graphics professional for nearly fifty years. His father was an artist too, and Crawford was determined to be one from the time he could hold a pencil.

While still a junior in high school, he sold a cartoon about the Beatles to the Saturday Evening Post. The issue appeared the week the group appeared on the “Ed Sullivan Show,” in February of 1964. As a result, Crawford was a celebrity of sorts for a while, and then went back to being the “weird kid” who drew pictures in algebra class, he says.

A rich and varied career as an illustrator and graphic designer that started right out of high school provided him with the opportunity to work in nearly every medium there is, but his first love has always been watercolor.

“Watercolor can be an unforgiving medium; you cannot cover up a mistake as easily as oils or acrylics might permit,” Crawford says. “Ah, but the ‘happy accidents’ one occasionally encounters can be gratifying, indeed.

“Juxtaposing detailed subjects with loose, washy backgrounds can yield dramatic results. The subtle transitions that can be achieved when blending colors are unique to watercolor.”

Crawford has illustrated several books and covers and has a few children’s books to his credit, some of which he wrote as well. He is currently illustrating “The Flying Mouse,” which will be followed by a book he wrote and illustrated called “Hill Farm.”

When illustrating a book, Crawford researches his subjects thoroughly and takes many reference photos so light, shadow, fabric and reflections are accurately rendered.

Crawford has also enjoyed taking part in community theater for more than two decades, and has portrayed many well-known characters in musical theater. He designed and helped to build sets for many productions. For the past six years, he has designed and built the sets for Chandler Center for the Arts children’s theater camp productions that are presented over the Fourth of July weekend every year.

Not content to simply paint, illustrate, design, and act, Greg also writes the occasional theater review for The Herald of Randolph. He wrote a short play called “Finding Earl” and well over a hundred articles for The Mountain Times of Killington.

Crawford was not born in Vermont, but he says he got here as fast as he could, sometime back in the 1970s.

See his free show in the Gifford Gallery, located just left of the main lobby of the medical center at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. To learn more about the Gallery, call (802) 728-2324.

Gifford Gallery Featuring ‘X-pressions’ By Jan Rogers

Jan Rogers' art show at Gifford

A loon done in pastel, “Morning Solitude,” is part of Jan Rogers’ show at Gifford.

Jan Rogers brings her “X-pressions” graphite, pastel and colored pencil works to the Gifford Medical Center art gallery March 27-May 29.

Rogers of Williamstown uses various sizes of compressed paper stumps to apply graphite, pastel, and colored pencil to Bristol board, mat board, and pastel and vellum papers. Values, tones, and textures are constructed by drawing and blending to create depth and shading, resulting in a combination of lights and darks making the works almost “photo-realistic.”

“Most of my work is done in the fine line drawing method using a soft touch, subtle elimination of lines, and acute attention to detail,” says Rogers. “These skills can turn a drawing into a painting.”

“Graphite is my choice of medium because of the detail that can be achieved,” Rogers adds, noting that she uses pastel and colored pencil with some of her graphite works to enhance a single area.

Jan Rogers' art show at Gifford

Jan Rogers’ “Careen” is done in graphite on vellum with a colored pencil accent.

Rogers has been drawing and painting most of her life. She attended workshops at the Ashton Art Institute in Connecticut on fine line drawing, and works out of a home studio on commissions and inspirations for upcoming shows.

Her paintings have been exhibited in galleries and shows in Connecticut, Arizona, California, and now Vermont, where she is a member of the Paletteers art group. She has won awards for her unique method and also designs one-of-a-kind notecards that are sold in Gifford’s Garden Gate Gift Shop.

Her show at Gifford is free and open to the public. Works can be purchased in the Gift Shop.

The Gifford Gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. The Gift Shop is on the south end of the hospital near the entrance to the nursing home and Birthing Center.

To learn more about this show or displaying your work in the gallery, call Volunteer Coordinator Julie Fischer at (802) 728-2324.

Unique Kari Meyer Landscape Paintings In Gifford Gallery

Gifford Medical Center

This photo shows one of Kari Meyer’s paintings now on display in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery. Called “Morning Meadow,” it is acrylic on canvas and painted on Beaver Meadow Road in Marshfield.

Montpelier painter Kari Meyer’s unique landscapes are in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery through Jan. 30.

Born and raised in the Northeast Kingdom, Meyer’s love of nature started at an early age. She spent much of her childhood playing in the woods and rivers near her rural home.

She attended high school at St. Johnsbury Academy. The school offered in-depth classes in art and Meyer says she fell in love with acrylic painting. She went on to earn an associate degree in multimedia and graphic design from Champlain College and then her bachelor’s degree in studio art from the University of Vermont.

Her knowledge of graphic design, she says, continues to be integrated into her artwork. Her studies at UVM also sparked an interest in sculpture. On close inspection, viewers of Meyer’s work can see her love of texture and three dimensions.

“As an artist I see art as a form of communication that has a power beyond that of words. Through imagery I attempt to portray ideas that words cannot, like the archetypal beauty that connects all things,” Meyer says. “I attempt to create a positive experience for the viewer, while also hoping to make a positive commentary on the world.”

Meyer works from photographs. She estimates a third of her time creating a painting is spent in the woods and walking the back roads of Vermont in search of the places that portray the magic and beauty of the landscape.

She works in digital photography, using a computer to alter colors, lighting and even composition of some of her images. By incorporating different textures and materials into her paintings, she creates an even more dynamic image that changes with lighting, casting its own shadows and creating a depth and mystery within each image.

Meyer says her imagery demonstrates an abstraction of nature, with her inspiration coming in part from the ideals of wabi-sabi, a prominent philosophy of Japanese aesthetics.

“For me wabi-sabi changes the worldview of Western civilization. Things we normally view as negative become beautiful. Loneliness, old age and death become beautiful because they are inevitable and represent the constant flux of the universe,” Meyer says. “I attempt to address this idea of the movement of eternity, of everything either coming from or returning to nothingness. My work urges the viewer to contemplate the relationship between oneself, nature and the universe.”

See Meyer’s work for yourself at Gifford. The show is free and open to the public. The gallery is just inside the main entrance of the medical center, located south of Randolph village. For directions and more information, visit www.giffordmed.org.  Learn more about Meyer’s work online at www.karimeyer.com.

The Art of Sharing

Northfield fiber artist Pamela Druhen's "Threadscapes"Northfield fiber artist Pamela Druhen, far left, recently shared some of her unique “Threadscapes” with Menig Extended Care Facility residents.

The pieces meld quilting and thread work to create what look like paintings in fabric and thread.

Some of Druhen’s smaller pieces are on display in Gifford Medical Center’s gallery in Randolph. She brought larger pieces to adjoining Menig to provide the nursing home residents their own private art show. Staff and residents peppered her with questions on her technique and were astounded by her work.