One Teaspoon of Thoughtfulness: Community Clinics

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

one teaspoon of thoughtfulness

Phyllis and Roland Potter, 81 and 83 respectively, have been going to the Bethel Health Center since it opened. First the Sharon couple saw Dr. Ronald Gadway. They now see Dr. Mark Seymour. But another smiling face that greets them is just as impactful as their primary caregiver. That person is medical secretary Kathy Benson, says Phyllis.

“I’ve known Kathy since she was a little girl. We know her parents. She’s a very thoughtful girl. She’s a sweetheart. If I needed help out to the car, she’d be there in a minute. She would help anyone in a minute.”  ~ Phyllis Potter

Gifford medical secretary Kathy Benson

Medical secretary Kathy Benson with Phyllis and Roland Potter

Camaraderie, Improving Health Among Greatest Rewards – Drs. Terry Cantlin & Mark Seymour

Dr. Terry CantlinDr. Terry Cantlin joined the Bethel Health Center in 1987. He attended the University of Health Science in Kansas City, Missouri, and went on to an internship and residency at the Osteopathic Hospital of Maine in Portland. 

He worked for the Indian Health Service on the Jicarilla Apache Reservation in Dulce, New Mexico for three years and then as emergency room director at the Downeast Community Hospital in Machias, Maine before joining the Bethel practice, which was then owned by Drs. Ronald Gadway and Edward Armstrong. 

Originally from Lebanon, New Hampshire, Dr. Cantlin lives in Randolph Center with his wife, Betsy. They have two children. Dr. Cantlin is well-known outside the health center for his role as a member of the band “Jeanne and the Hi-Tops”. He also enjoys woodworking, sports, and cooking.

Dr. Mark SeymourDr. Mark Seymour joined the Bethel Health Center in 1989. He attended medical school at the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine in his home town of Biddeford, Maine.

He went on to complete his internship at Flint Osteopathic Hospital in Michigan and his residency at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester. He practiced at the Indian Health Service from 1985-1989, first in Chinle, Arizona on a Navajo reservation and then in Browning, Montana on a Blackfeet reservation. He joined the Bethel practice in 1989, which became part of Gifford a year later.

Dr. Seymour lives in Randolph Center with his wife, Becky. They have two children, Jane and Will. Dr. Seymour enjoys family, reading, hiking, and following Boston sports in his free time.

Below is their story as told in the words of Dr. Cantlin, as featured in our 2012 Annual Report.

Dr. Mark Seymour and I have practiced together for nearly 25 years at the Bethel Health Center. This has been an introspective and rewarding experience for each of us. We’ve enjoyed the comprehensive nature of family practice. The ability to care for patients of all ages with a wide range of problems and to be able to follow patients and families throughout their entire life span is a blessing. To be trusted with this care is an honor.

We’ve each had many interesting cases and challenging diagnoses, but the ones that are truly rewarding for us are those that have been transformational in improving someone’s life. Helping people to overcome substance abuse (tobacco, alcohol, and drugs), helping them to lose weight and exercise more, and assisting in coping with stressors and depression are extremely time and energy-consuming problems. They require persistent effort over many visits, but ultimately have the greatest impact on a patient’s overall well-being and happiness.

Even though these cases are rewarding, our most satisfying and memorable experiences have come from being long-time colleagues and friends, and working with everyone at the Bethel Health Center. All the employees at the health center are like a big family. We’ve spent many years together and all take pride in the care being delivered at our clinic.

Mark and I have a lot in common. We each have close ties to Maine, where we have both lived and trained. As osteopathic physicians, we share a similar education and philosophy toward patient care. We both served a number of years in the Indian Health Service and had many common experiences, or “war stories”. Finally, we have shared an office space, back to back, for 20 years. It has been extremely helpful and enjoyable having a colleague and friend to discuss difficult cases and other issues with all of these years. It is this comaraderie that will be our lasting impression.”

~ Terry Cantlin, D.O.
Bethel Health Center family medicine physician

Drs. Terry Cantlin and Mark Seymour

Above – Drs. Cantlin and Seymour have worked back-to-back for years as seen in this 2008 photograph of the providers in their office. Bottom – the long-time friends and co-workers enjoy an afternoon in the freshly fallen snow.

Nurse practitioner Emily LeVan Joins Bethel Health Center

Emily LeVan

Nurse practitioner Emily LeVan joins Bethel Health Center

RANDOLPH – Family nurse practitioner Emily LeVan of Randolph Center has joined the Bethel Health Center. The Bethel clinic is part of Gifford Medical Center.

LeVan earned her family nurse practitioner master’s degree from University of Cincinnati and her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Southern Maine in Portland. She is certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

She previously worked as an emergency department registered nurse at Central Vermont Medical Center, Gifford Medical Center, and Miles Memorial Hospital in Damariscotta, Maine, for seven years. She has also worked as a health care consultant with The Chewonki Foundation in Wiscasset, Maine, and teaches licensed nursing assistant and medical terminology courses at the Randolph Technical Career Center.

She previously taught Spanish and was a field hockey and track coach in Maine and Massachusetts for six years after earning her a bachelor’s in environmental studies and Spanish from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, and studying Spanish at Middlebury College.

An Oklahoma City native, LeVan moved to New England for school.

She enjoyed teaching and coaching, but was drawn to health care. “I wanted to do something different. I had always been interested in health care,” says LeVan, whose father is a dentist.

As she sought to advance her nursing degree, she chose family practice.

“I wanted to work directly with patients and help them achieve their maximum state of health and wellness,” she says.

She joined Gifford for the opportunity to work in her community and for the culture at Gifford. “I love that when you walk down the hall, people say ‘hi,’” she says, adding, “I feel that it’s an organization that supports the so-called ‘midlevel’ providers very nicely.”
LeVan sees whole families across the lifespan, offering accessible care with a focus on openness and encouraging healthy lifestyle choices.

With a background in emergency medicine, LeVan is a trained sexual assault nurse examiner. Her other interests include women’s health and sports medicine, especially for young people.

LeVan is a former marathoner, who twice finished as the top U.S. female in the Boston Marathon, finished high in other major races (including a seventh-place finish in the Women’s U.S. Marathon Championships in St. Paul, Minn., in 2006) and even participated in the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trials.

She has also traveled extensively through Mexico, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Ecuador and Bolivia, serving as an athletic services coordinator for the U.S. Olympic Committee at the 2011 Pam American Games in Guadalajara and as a volunteer nurse and translator on a medical mission to Nicaragua.

She is married with a daughter and co-owns her family’s farm, the ALL Together Farm in Randolph Center, selling sustainably produced meats and eggs.

LeVan can be reached Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at the Bethel Health Center at 234-9913. She joins long-time family physicians Dr. Terry Cantlin and Dr. Mark Seymour and physician assistant Tammy Gerdes.

Free women’s health talk addresses menopause, genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancers

Ellamarie Russo-DeMara

Dr. Ellamarie Russo-DeMara

RANDOLPH – Gynecologist and certified menopause practitioner Dr. Ellamarie Russo-DeMara is leading a free women’s health talk on April 10 from 6-7 p.m. in the Porter Community Room at the Montshire Museum of Science in Norwich.

Dr. Russo-DeMara, who provides women’s health care in White River Junction at the Twin River Health Center and at the Bethel Health Center, will address menopause, genetic testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers and more.

The talk is free. Participants, however, are encouraged to register by calling the Twin River Health Center at 296-7370 by April 3.

The Twin River and Bethel health centers are part of Gifford Medical Center in Randolph. Dr. Russo-DeMara has been providing women’s care for more than two decades. Learn more online at www.giffordmed.org.