Expertise, Personalized Care, and Comprehensive Support Close to Home

This article was published in our Cancer Program 2014 Annual Report.

Brenda CaswellWhen someone is given a cancer diagnosis, their world is turned upside down. Suddenly there is a lot of information to absorb, many tests to take, and hard decisions that have to be made quickly—all when people are feeling most vulnerable.

Travelling to receive treatment and follow-up cancer care can be expensive, exhausting, and complicated to organize. At Gifford patients with cancer have treatment options that can relieve these stresses.

Most cancers—especially breast, colon, prostate, and bladder cancers—can be treated here in our community hospital with caregivers that patients know and trust, close to the family and friends who will support them during treatment.

“Our goal is to make sure people know that they can receive the same quality of care offered at larger hospitals close to home, with a support network they know,” said Rebecca O’Berry, vice-president of Surgery and Operations at Gifford. “Battling a cancer diagnosis is hard enough—I’m thankful that we can provide quality cancer care locally and decrease our patient’s travel time during treatment.”

First accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer in 1965 (we received our most recent 3-year accreditation in December of 2014), our cancer program has been delivering quality cancer care to our community for nearly fifty years. Our oncology services include cancer care from an experienced oncologist, hospital specialists and surgeons, and specially certified oncology nurses; lab and diagnostic services; advanced diagnostic services, including stereotactic breast imaging; outpatient chemotherapy; preventive cancer screenings; and a strong palliative care program. Our multidisciplinary approach to each patient’s care includes identifying social service needs as well as appropriate medical expertise.

Experience, expertise, and compassionate care close to home

“With cancer, making the right diagnosis and getting the right treatment is key,” says Dr. Richard Graham, a Gifford urologist who treats prostate, bladder, and renal cancers. “Experience with specific cancers is also important. We have the expertise and technology to diagnose a lot of rare cancers, but we are small enough to see patients as individuals: You are not a number here.”

Graham notes that he saw an increase in patients whose small cancers were treated with cryosurgery and laparoscopic surgery in 2014.

Personalized support for the cancer care each patient chooses

When a patient chooses cancer treatment that is not offered here, our providers make referrals and collaborate with outside oncologists so things go smoothly. Patients have the option to receive post-operative care and chemo treatments close to home.

Brenda Caswell, a Randolph mother of five, regularly comes to Gifford for medical care and annual mammogram screenings. She missed three years of annual visits because of her pregnancy and the birth of her youngest child, and when she resumed her check-in’s her provider insisted that she get a mammogram.

“My provider didn’t let me out of the office without scheduling a mammogram,” Caswell says. “She knew me, knew that my mom had had breast cancer, and knew that regular screening was especially important for me.”

A small tumor was detected, and after a biopsy and two consultations with Dr. Ciccarelli, she decided to have mastectomy and reconstructive breast surgery through a program offered at a larger hospital. Dr. Ciccarelli’s team made referrals and helped her arrange treatment. When her cancer was found to be more invasive than originally thought, she had to plan for chemotherapy after surgery. Then, when post-operative complications required a week of inpatient care right before the holidays, she knew she wanted to be close to home and with her family.

“I was able to be at Gifford, just down the street from my home,” Caswell said. “The doctors were wonderful—they collaborated with the oncologists who were treating me, sharing blood counts and test results. It was a very smooth process.”

Click here to read our full Cancer Program 2014 Annual Report.

Gifford Cancer Program Overview

Gifford's cancer program

This article was published in our Cancer Program 2014 Annual Report.

Gifford cancer committeeEstablished in 1959, Gifford’s Cancer Program is accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.

A dedicated cancer committee meets regularly to provide leadership for the program, including setting program goals and objectives, driving quality improvements and best outcomes for patients, and coordinating Gifford’s multidisciplinary approach to cancer treatment.

Operating out of our relaxing Ambulatory Care Unit, Gifford’s Oncology Department includes:

  • Cancer care from an experienced oncologist
  • Specially certified oncology nurses
  • Planning options for cancer treatment following a diagnosis
  • Outpatient chemotherapy
  • Treatments for some hematology conditions

The medical center is home to advanced diagnostic technology, including stereotactic breast biopsies; a breast care coordinator providing education and outreach; a patient care navigator; many surgical offerings; data management and quality oversight; and cancer prevention programs, including a “Prevention into Practice” model that works with patients and their health care providers to bring screenings to the forefront.

Click here to read our full Cancer Program 2014 Annual Report.

Free Men’s Health Talk Provides Expert Advice in Comfortable Setting

Gifford Medical Center general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli

Gifford Medical Center general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli

RANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center general surgeon Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli and urologist Dr. Richard Graham will lead a free men’s health talk on June 6 on colorectal health, prostate cancer and erectile dysfunction.

The talk will be held from 6-7:30 p.m. in the Randolph hospital’s Conference Center with free pizza and refreshments served at 5:30 p.m.

The talk aims to raise awareness of men’s health issues and preventable conditions, such as colon cancer, in a comfortable atmosphere, says Rebecca O’Berry, Gifford vice president of surgery.

“Both of our physicians are very approachable and personable and are able to find the humorous side of these topics,” O’Berry said. “I’m thrilled that we have two surgeons who are gifted, passionate, and so easy to talk to.”

Dr. Ciccarelli has been a general surgeon for more than 20 years, providing surgical care and colonoscopies at Gifford since 2007.

Colorectal cancer is the third most frequently diagnosed cancer in both men and women in the United States and Vermont.

Colorectal cancer develops from polyps that grow – silently, unseen and unfelt – on the inside wall of the colon. Many polyps will never become cancer, but some will over the years.

A colonoscopy can both detect and prevent colorectal cancer. This is because during a colonoscopy, these polyps are removed in their precancerous state or before disease can be felt, preventing the onset or the spread of the disease. And when found early, colorectal cancer is highly curable.

Without colonoscopies, it is not until polyps become cancerous, grow large, and block the colon or break through the colon wall that colon cancer symptoms are evident.

“This is one area of medicine where we can actually prevent disease, extend lives, and improve quality of life,” says Dr. Ciccarelli, who will also discuss other common colorectal health issues, such as diverticulosis, anal fissures, and hemorrhoids.

Dr. Richard Graham

Gifford’s new urologist, Dr. Richard Graham

A renowned urologist, Dr. Graham has been practicing urology for 28 years and has performed surgeries around the world. He joined Gifford’s urology practices in Randolph and at the Twin River Health Center in White River Junction last year, bringing new procedures to the hospital.

An urologist specializes in diseases of the male and female urinary tract as well as male reproductive organs. Dr. Graham will consequently talk about common male reproductive ailments, including prostate cancer and erectile dysfunction.

In Vermont, prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death, according to the Vermont Department of Health. Nationally, about one in six men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer during his lifetime. The average age of diagnosis is 67.

Treatment for prostate cancer can sometimes cause erectile dysfunction, a condition that affects millions of men in the United States and can be a sign of more serious disease.

Dr. Graham will address how prostate cancer is diagnosed and treatment options, and what works for the treatment of erectile dysfunction. He’ll also discuss the controversy over PSA (prostate-specific antigen) blood tests for men, when they should be performed, what they mean, and why doctors order the screening.

“It’s a serious subject,” Dr. Graham says of the talk that he has given around the world, “but it’s also interactive.”

The event is open to men of all ages and to couples. There is no cost to attend but registration is encouraged. Call 728-2104 by May 30 to sign-up.

Gifford is an American College of Surgeons’ Commission on Cancer nationally accredited cancer program. The hospital is located at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12 south of the village) in Randolph. The Conference Center is on the first floor of the hospital and marked by a green awning. Learn more online at