Schulte Exhibit at Gifford Medical Center’s Art Gallery

Lynn Schulte

“Remembrance,” on display in the Gifford Medical Center Gallery, is part of a series artist Lynn Schulte created to celebrate the memory of her mother.

Georgetown, MA artist Lynne Schulte will be exhibiting her paintings in the Gifford Medical Center Art Gallery from May 5th through June 10th, 2015.

The exhibit displays selections from “Remembrance – the Pink Chair Project,” and images inspired by the coastal beauty of New England. Her floral cards and book, Remembrance, will be available in the gift shop.

Schulte has exhibited her work in solo shows in New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas, Maine, New York, Massachusetts, and Washington DC. Primary among her themes are coastal views and landscapes of Vermont, Maine, and Massachusetts.

Notable series included “A Year in Bloom” when she produced 365 smaller paintings of flowers in oil and watercolor, shown at the AVA gallery in Lebanon, NH. This series was followed by “Fresh Bloom,” consisting of 15 larger floral works, shown at the Latham Library in Thetford, VT. A “Coastal Sunrise” body of work was shown at the Marblehead Arts Association.

“Remembrance – the Pink Chair Project” celebrated the memory of the artist’s mother in moving and beautiful images and was shown in 14 venues over 3 years. Each painting has a story, told in her accompanying book, and these enrich the experience for the viewer. Lynne’s current body of work is a series on the Working Waterfront.

She has taught and has been an art education administrator in Maryland, Vermont, and Massachusetts, and currently teaches private lessons in her studio, specializing in color, painting, and college portfolio development. Schulte holds a BS from Nazareth College of Rochester, NY; an MFA from Antioch University; and a CAGS from Vermont College of the Union Institute and University.

Currently living in Georgetown, MA, Schulte has ties to Vermont from her tenure at as art teacher and Fine Arts Department Chair at Woodstock Union High School. She is married to Thomas LaValley, who was born in Burlington, VT and is a Vermont Distinguished Principal from his many years in educational leadership. Lynne and Tom frequently visit Vermont to be with friends and family.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through June 10, 2015. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

A Message from the Medical Staff President Dr. Ellamarie Russo-DeMara

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Medical Staff President Dr. Ellamarie Russo-DeMara

Medical Staff President Dr. Ellamarie Russo-DeMara

As president of the Medical Staff I have witnessed firsthand the hard work and dedication not only of our medical team, but of all those behind the scenes who make Gifford a place where patients are a priority.

With economic and healthcare issues front and center in our daily news, it’s reassuring to work for an organization that is fiscally stable without sacrificing quality of care. I know I speak for the entire health care team when I say how fortunate we are to have our new FQHC designation, which will allow us to provide much needed dental and mental health services to our community.

Gifford continues to lead the way in its vision for the future of providing quality care for our community. At the forefront of that vision is the creation of a new Senior Living Community, where our seniors can be cared for in a home-like setting.

As part of this process we are fortunate to be able to “rejuvenate” our existing space into private, more comfortable rooms that will allow us to improve the efficiency and quality of the care we offer our patients.

It has been an exciting year of planning and creating new ways to provide access to the high-quality care we offer through all stages of life—from newborn through to nursing home resident.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

A Vision for the Future: Meeting Tomorrow’s Health Care Needs

A message from Development Director Ashley Lincoln

Ashley Lincoln

Above: Ashley Lincoln, Development Director, and Vision for the Future Campaign Committee members Dr. Lou DiNicola (Co-chair), Linda Chugkowski, and Lincoln Clark (Co-chair) at the site of Gifford’s new Morgan Orchards Senior Living Community.

Since outreach began, a little over 18 months ago, many generous donors have stepped up to pledge $3 million for Gifford’s “Vision for the Future” campaign.

This $5 million capital campaign will support patient room upgrades and a new senior living community, improvements that will help us continue to provide the best possible community health care for years to come.

This impressive early support—from members of the business community, Gifford’s volunteer board of Trustees and Directors, former trustees, medical staff, employees, the Gifford Medical Center Auxiliary—is already having an impact.

The beautiful new Menig building that you’ve watched growing in Randolph Center will open in May as an anchor for the new Morgan Orchards Senior Living Community. Soon after, renovation of the vacated hospital wing begins, creating 25 new single-patient rooms that will improve patient privacy, allow state-of-the-art technology to be brought to the bedside, and create an environment that promotes and speeds the healing process.

Humbled and energized by this wonderful start, I can now officially announce that our “silent phase” ended on Saturday, March 7, with the public launch of our “Vision for the Future” campaign at the medical center’s 109th Annual Meeting of Corporators.

Over the years our community has generously supported Gifford through many evolutions. Moving forward we will need everyone’s help to raise the remaining $2 million by the end of 2015. Our goal of $5 million may seem lofty, but this campaign will help us address unprecedented challenges and opportunities in health care.

Providing quality medical care in the hospital and our nine community health centers is central to our mission. We care for patients locally, eliminating the need to travel—sometimes over mountains, often in treacherous winter conditions. Over the years we have invested in state-of-the-art technology, retained high quality staff, and adopted a hospitalist model that helps us care for sicker patients. Modernizing our patient rooms is a next step in improving patient comfort and providing the best care.

A real community concern is a lack of living and care options for our seniors. As our friends and neighbors age and are looking to downsize, we want them to stay where they have grown up, worked, raised their family, and built relationships. Each individual is a piece of our community quilt: when one leaves, it starts to fray.

Your support for this project will help us sustain our community’s health—and protect our “community quilt”—with the very best care, from birth through old age, for another 110 years.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

Space that Speeds the Healing Process

One patient per hospital room is good medicine. Here’s why…

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

individual hospital rooms

Semi-private rooms offer little privacy or space for patients, their families and
hospital staff. Private patient rooms will alleviate the overcrowding that is typical of shared rooms.

The reality of a shared hospital room is that you don’t get to choose your roommate.

“We do our best to match up personalities and scenarios and illnesses and infection issues,” says Alison White, vice president of the hospital division, “but there are things like having a roommate who is a night owl and you like to be in bed by 7:30. If we need a bed and your room happens to be that one empty bed, you get who you get.”

The new reality at Gifford is that every hospital patient will soon have a room of their own as part of a construction project that received its final okay in October 2013. In spring 2015, when 30-bed Menig Extended Care moves to Randolph Center, the hospital will begin converting the vacated wing. The number of rooms for hospital patients will double while the number of hospital beds—25—remains the same, a ratio that guarantees maximum comfort and safety. The renovations are also an opportunity to open up ceilings, replace old systems, and improve energy efficiency.

“When patients are recovering from surgery or from illness, they want what they want,” says Rebecca O’Berry, vice president of operations and the surgical division.

“Sharing a room with somebody else just doesn’t work for most patients. From the surgeon’s point of view, if I’ve just replaced your total hip, the last thing I want is for you to be in a room with someone who might be brewing an infection.”

White names several other factors, besides the risk of infection, that have helped make private rooms the standard in hospitals today. Among them:

Faster healing: Studies show that patients who are in private rooms need less pain medication because they’re in a more soothing environment. If your roommate has IV pumps that are going off, or the nurse has to check your neighbor every one or two hours—which is very common—the lights go on, the blood pressure machine goes off, the nurse has to speak with the person in the bed next to you. With private rooms, all that is removed.

Ease of movement: Our rooms were built before the current technology existed. IV poles didn’t exist. We now have people with two or three pumps. With today’s technology there’s no room to move around. When you have two of everything—two chairs, two overbed tables, two wastebaskets—it creates an obstacle course.

Better doctor-patient communication: As professionals, we don’t always get the whole story because the patient doesn’t want to be overheard by his neighbor.

Patient satisfaction: Larger rooms, each with a bathroom, will give patients additional privacy and enhance the patient experience. It’s a win-win for everybody.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

Gifford Staff Raise Money for March of Dimes

Blue Jeans for Babies fundraiser

Roger Clapp and JoEllen Calderara from March of Dimes in Vermont, receive check from Ellen Fox, RN, and Kim Summers, Birthing Center assistant nurse manager. The check was for $505 in employee donations to Blue Jeans for Babies day, and Gifford’s sponsorship of the CVT March for Babies in May.

More than 100 Gifford Medical Center employees raised $505 for the March of Dimes by wearing “Blue Jeans for Babies” to work on Friday, March 20, 2015.

Each March the Randolph medical center and its outlying health clinics participate in the fund-raiser, which allows employees who donate $5 to the March of Dimes to wear jeans to work for the day. The March of Dimes is the nation’s leading non-profit organization for pregnancy and baby health. It raises funds through a variety of events to help prevent birth defects, premature births, and infant mortality.

Roger Clapp, executive director of the March of Dimes in Vermont, thanked hospital employees for their participation in the fund-raiser and – as a medical center with a renowned Birthing Center – for their work toward healthy births.

“The March of Dimes recognizes the care and commitment to excellence among the Gifford team that contributes to Vermont’s national lead in preventing premature birth. We’re particularly thankful to be able to reinvest the staff’s fund-raising proceeds to give every baby in Vermont a healthier start,” Clapp said.

Gifford Birthing Center Assistant Nurse Manager Karen Summers and RN Ellen Fox presented the check to Clapp and Jo Ellen Calderara of March of Dimes in Vermont.

Gifford is also a sponsor of the Central Vermont March for Babies walk on Sunday, May 3, 2015 at Montpelier High School. Sign-up online at www.marchforbabies.org or by calling 802-560-3239.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

A Message from Board Chair Gus Meyer

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Gifford Board Chair Gus Meyer

Board Chair Gus Meyer

What a momentous year it’s been! Things we had been planning for years came to fruition in 2014. Even as these fundamental changes in our organization have taken place, Gifford has maintained its remarkable fiscal stability and continued our steady growth in the proficiency, professionalism, and breadth of service that we provide.

In 2015, we anticipate completion of the nursing home, renovation of the space that Menig now occupies, expansion of mental health and dental services associated with the FQHC, and full implementation of the EMR, along with ongoing commitment to fiscal responsibility and improvement in quality of care.

These accomplishments are all the more amazing because they have been achieved in a very uncertain health care environment. While Governor Shumlin has suspended planning for single payer health care, many other aspects of health care reform continue. For example, accountable care organizations are now in development, with the goal of changing from fee-for-service to covered lives reimbursement.

How these changes get implemented will have profound impact on how medical decisions are made, as well as how and where care is delivered. In the coming year, as we pursue the internal strands mentioned above, we will also maintain our active involvement in the health care reform planning process, working to ensure that Gifford’s patients continue to have the highest quality, locally provided health care possible.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

Going Digital

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

converting to electronic medical recordsFlashback to March 2014. Gifford’s switch to electronic medical records, the industry standard, has been in the works for a couple of years. The challenge: To complete the transition before spring 2015, when government penalties are due to kick in. For the shift to occur, providers—doctors and other medical professionals—will have to learn to use the system. This learning will be put to the test in front of patients. A prevailing sentiment: “I was really hoping I’d retire before we got around to doing this.”

“EMR came out of the Affordable Care Act as a sort of a mandate for us,” says Gifford Administrator Joe Woodin. “We had some electronic files and file management in the past, as many hospitals do, but now there’s a clear mandate of completing that loop, and the government has given us economic incentives to do it, as well as economic penalties if we don’t. So like every other hospital in the country, we’ve been passionately working on this for a couple of years.”

When we think of doctors, we think of clipboards and script pads and cheap ballpoint pens. We think of scrawly handwriting. With the shift to EMR, doctors who were used to scribbling notes on charts and sending them to medical transcriptionists were being asked to give up those tools and plug in the data electronically. VP of Finance Jeff Hebert likens the task to mastering Excel when you’ve been doing spreadsheets by hand for years.

“To add more complexity,” says Hebert, “the product was a brand-new one for our hospital vendor; they redesigned it and we were the first to be going live with it. So in addition to my Excel analogy going on with our providers, CPSI was introducing us to a product that they weren’t that familiar with because they had just created it.” Across the health-care system, a piecemeal electronic infrastructure that lacks standardization—unlike, say, the banking system—did nothing to make the task easier.

By March, pediatrics was trained and ready to go. The first wave of physicians began walking into exam rooms hugging their new laptops. Office visits slowed.

Gifford's electronic medical records

“A lot of organizations have found that transitioning to EMR affects their productivity and some of their morale,” says Woodin. “It asks a lot of the providers and the patients. The challenge would be equivalent to going metric or if you were asked to speak a different language.”

Over the summer, primary care joined the campaign. Neurology, surgery, and other specialists stepped up in the fall.

Meanwhile, providers and patients were starting to experience the benefits of the new system.

“Electronic medical records will allow our organization to be fully integrated across the continuum of care, from inpatient to outpatient to pharmacy—the whole thing. And it’s going to allow us to better care for you. If you walk into the ER and you’re a patient in our Bethel clinic, the ER can pull up your record from this morning—it’s already there,” says Rebecca O’Berry, vice president of operations and the surgical division.

“So if you’re a poor historian—meaning, for instance, that you can’t remember what pills you take or whether you’ve had your gall bladder out—or you just know that you saw somebody today and you still don’t feel well, they can pull it up, whereas before we had nothing. If it’s seven o’clock at night, you can’t call Bethel and say, ‘Hey, I need you to pull this record and read to me what happened.’ There’s no delay, no lag time waiting for dictation. For somebody who has had care and needs more care within the next day or two of their last visit, everything’s there, and that’s the beauty of it.”

By the end of the year, providers were settling into their new routine and at least some of the kinks had been worked out of the new system.

“We’ve done a good job,” said Woodin. “We’re working through it. There are always improvements to be made.”

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

Recognizing Employee Commitment

Annual Employee Awards

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Members of our Gifford family were recognized at the Employee Awards Banquet on October 18 at Vermont Technical College for their years of service. (Employees are recognized in five-year increments.)

Congratulations to these individuals and thank you to all for your dedication and service.

annual Gifford employee awards

5 YEARS
Diane Alves
Teresa Bradley
Amy Chiriatti
Eric Christensen
James Currie
Tammy Dempsey
Lyle Farnham
David Gehlbach
Tammy Gerdes
Marjorie Gewirz
Thom Goodwin
Lindsay Haupt
Cathy Jacques
Thomas Maylin
Megan McKinstry
Loretta Miller
Michael Minchin
Susan Moore
Megan O’Brien
Martha Palmer
Heather Pejouhy
Rella Rice
Matthew Shangraw
Paul Smith
Meghan Sperry
Debra Stender
Thomas Young

10 YEARS
Lori Barrett
Jamie Cushman
Amy Danley-White
Jennifer Davis
Nancy Davoll
Cynthia Legacy
Patricia Manning
Rhonda Schumann
Rebecca Jo Ward
Lisa Young

15 YEARS
Kathrine Benson
Sadie Lyford
Shelley McDonald
Kathleen Paglia
Dessa Rogers
David Sanville
Linda Sprague
Joseph Woodin
Carol Young

20 YEARS
Kenneth Borie
Louis DiNicola
Milton Fowler
Betsy Hannah
Jean Keyes
Cheryl McRae
David Pattison

25 YEARS
Dawn Beriau
Karin Olson
Renee Pedersen
Kathi Pratt

40 YEARS
Judith Santamore

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

Preparing and Adapting to a Changing Health-Care Landscape

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

building for the future with Gifford Medical Center

A message from Administrator Joe Woodin

FISCAL YEAR 2014 was a transformative one for Gifford as several long-term initiatives came to fruition—efforts that will not only benefit patients but also position Gifford well for the future in an era of health-care reform.

In November 2013, a very excited Senator Bernie Sanders called to say that Gifford had been designated a Federally Qualified Health Center. What we qualified for were federal funds that provide greater access to primary care—including dental and mental-health services—for Medicaid patients and the uninsured. By July, after a lot of hard work by our administrative team, we were ready to start drawing on those funds.

The Gifford Retirement Community now under construction in Randolph Center passed its final regulatory hurdle a month before the senator’s phone call, and ground was broken in the spring. Add to these developments the hospital’s conversion to single-patient rooms and Gifford’s transition to electronic medical records and you can see why we’ve titled this report “Building for the Future.” In the following pages, we discuss the new developments and relate them to the changing health-care landscape.

Last but not least, Gifford “made budget” for the fifteenth year in a row, a feat not replicated by any other hospital in Vermont. Achieving its state-approved operating margin is an indicator of Gifford’s health as a medical center, community organization, and employer, and credit for this achievement goes to the entire staff.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More

Gifford Welcomes Ob/Gyn Dr. Elisabeth Nigrini

Dr. Elisabeth Negrini

Dr. Elisabeth Negrini

Dr. Elisabeth Nigrini has joined Gifford Health Care, expanding the comprehensive women’s health care team to three Ob/Gyn doctors and four certified nurse midwives.

A native of Pittsburgh, PA, Nigrini discovered early in life that she enjoyed teaching, working with people, and that she had a particular interest in women’s issues. She mentored adolescent girls as an undergraduate at Swarthmore College, was awarded a graduate fellowship in public affairs, and has volunteered with counseling hotlines and in women’s shelters.

In the field of women’s health she found a career that combined her driving interests. “In my third year of medical school I did a rotation in obstetrics and it was so rewarding,” she said. “I found a way to combine medicine with my commitment to public service, mentoring, and working with women.”

Nigrini has worked with underserved women in Tanzania and the United States, and had additional training in maternal-fetal medicine at Johns Hopkins University. She likes helping women through their labor and delivery experience, and most enjoys establishing continuing care relationships with her Ob/Gyn patients.

“Working with women’s health has an educational component that I enjoy because I feel I can have an impact,” said Nigrini. “People are willing to make changes when facing transitional periods. A woman may quit smoking when pregnant, or be more open to information about lifestyle changes—these things can impact an entire family.”

The move to Randolph is an especially good fit for Nigrini and her family. Her husband, Andy Erickson, MD, is also working at Gifford and they both wanted to practice medicine in a hospital where they could establish ongoing relationships with their patients. They also wanted to raise their two young daughters in a small community where they could enjoy the outdoors.

Board-certified by the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nigrini brings a set of skills and experience that enhance the comprehensive approach of Gifford’s women’s care services, particularly for women with complicated or higher risk pregnancies. She is currently accepting new patients. Call her at Gifford Ob/Gyn & Midwifery at (802) 728-2401.

Be Sociable, Share!
  • Twitter
  • Facebook
  • email
  • StumbleUpon
  • Delicious
  • Google Reader
  • LinkedIn
  • BlinkList
  • More