A Message from the Medical Director of the Hospital and Medicine Divisions, Dr. Martin Johns

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Dr. Martin Johns

Dr. Martin Johns

One evening when I was on duty, a 911-call patient was brought into the emergency room. The patient was unresponsive and unable to communicate.

I pulled up the electronic medical record and was able to see that he had been given a new medication when seen at a Gifford clinic earlier that day.

Clearly he was having a delayed allergic reaction, and because I could see exactly what medication he was given, I could immediately give him the appropriate antidote. If I had not had access to the information in EMR, I would have had to guess and start trying different medicines to counteract the reaction.

When another patient was confused about what medications they were taking, I pulled up their most immediate office note on EMR and made adjustments based on what had been done within the previous 24-hour period.

An important aspect of the new EMR system is that it allows medical information to follow the patient through transitions of care across all Gifford platforms: inpatient care, outpatient care in community clinics, radiology, and emergency room visits.

In the past, important information could be unavailable or even lost during these transitions—a clinic might be closed for the day, or important information not yet added to a patient’s record. Now, anyone caring for a patient can view important information and also update the record (adding a newly developed allergy or immunization) or note changes in clinical status.

Gifford Welcomes Two Radiologists to Medical Staff

Jeffrey Bath and Alan Ericksen integrate medical imaging expertise into patient care

Dr. Jeffrey Bath

Dr. Jeffrey Bath

With the arrival of two new radiologists, Gifford Medical Center has created its first employee-staffed Radiology Department. Gifford previously contracted radiology services through outside private practices.

Radiologists are physicians who specialize in diagnosing and treating diseases and injuries using medical imaging techniques—X-rays, Computed Tomography (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Ultrasound, Bone Density, Nuclear Medicine, and Mammography. They work closely with providers to provide accurate diagnoses and treatment recommendations.

“Having everyone on staff allows a seamless collaboration between the radiologists and our providers,” said Director of Ancillary Services Pam Caron. “We offer up-to-date diagnostic technology services to our patients, and having these physicians on staff strengthens our ability provide to personalized patient care close to home, with experts who are part of our community.”

Dr. Jeffrey Bath worked as a locum tenens at Gifford last summer and returned as a permanent employee in March. Previously he had a private practice affiliated with the North Adams (MA) Regional Hospital, which closed in 2014.

“I chose to specialize in radiology because I was attracted to the science side of medicine,” Bath said. “I like to troubleshoot and work closely with other providers to find the best way to deliver patient care.”

Dr Bath earned his BS and MD degrees from Tufts University and began training in Internal Medicine before changing to radiology. He completed a residency in Diagnostic Radiology at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

Dr. Alan Ericksen

Dr. Alan Ericksen

Dr. Alan Ericksen joined Bath in Gifford’s Radiology department in May. He was partner and vice-president of Radiology Associates of Bennington (practicing at Southwestern Vermont Medical Center and Mary McClellan Hospital) before moving with his family to Tennessee in 2003, where he worked in practices that served several hospitals and as a locum tenens.

“After 12 years in Tennessee I really missed the country, so I am very glad to be back in Vermont,” Ericksen said. “I also enjoy meeting and talking with patients, which is possible in a small hospital setting like Gifford.”

Dr. Ericksen earned a BS from Houghton College and an MD from New Jersey Medical School. He completed a residency in internal medicine before deciding to become a radiologist, and then completed a diagnostic radiology residency (both at the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School).

A child prodigy whose artwork was displayed in the Met and Louvre, he says that radiology offered him a way to connect his interest in the visual with his interest in medicine. He still paints and exhibits, and also plays the French horn.

To learn more about Gifford’s Radiology department and the services offered visit www.giffordmed.org/Radiology or call 802-728-2214.

Gifford’s 2014 Highlights: January – March

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

January

Gifford's first baby of 2014The first baby of the year is born to Casandra Perry of Bethel. Baby Bryden is welcomed on Jan. 2 at 3:48 a.m.

A “Matters of the Heart” series is offered monthly all year long for heart patients, or anyone looking to improve his or her heart health. Also offered: Chronic Conditions Support Group, Caregiver Support Group, Diabetes Group Education Classes, childbirth classes, and a new Mood Disorder Support Group.

A “Quit In Person” tobacco cessation class helps those addicted to smoking or other tobacco products to quit.

A “Chronic Pain Healthier Living Workshop” is offered at the Randolph House. The six-week free series addresses coping with chronic pain.

Alison WhiteExperienced nurse leader Alison White joins Gifford as vice president of patient care services – a role that oversees the Hospital Division, including inpatient care, the Birthing Center, Ob/Gyn and Midwifery, the Emergency Department, Menig nursing home, and Adult Day Program.

After considerable input from providers, staff, and clergy, the Gifford board passes a policy implementing the Patient Choice at End of Life law. The policy allows willing primary care providers to prescribe lethal prescriptions but prohibits use of such prescriptions in the hospital setting.

February

An educational event shares Gifford’s “Vision for the Future” with Corporators. The vision focuses in part on constructing a senior living community in Randolph
Center.

Gifford Medical Center AuxiliaryThe Gifford Medical Center Auxiliary awards $19,000 to various Gifford departments, including equipment for inpatient units, pulse oximeters for primary care offices, play equipment and furniture for The Robin’s Nest Child Enrichment Center, and a handheld scanning device for Materials Management.

Dr. Robert CochraneExperienced hospitalist Dr. Robert Cochrane joins Gifford’s hospitalist (inpatient care) team.

An “Infant and Child CPR” class helps new parents and families learn lifesaving techniques.

A “Home Alone and Safe” course teaches children 8-11 how to respond to home alone situations.

March

A “Babysitter’s Training Course” is held for area pre-teens and teens seeking greater expertise in safe child care.

Dr. Michael ChamberlandChiropractor Dr. Michael Chamberland joins the Sharon Health Center sports medicine team.

A “Healthier Living Workshop” series begins, providing the chronically ill free information on improving their health.

A second “Quit In Person” tobacco cessation class is held, this time at the Gifford Health Center at Berlin.

Vermont Health ConnectGifford’s Health Connections office and Blueprint for Health team partner with Bi-State Primary Care to offer free help signing up for Vermont Health Connect. Help is available each weekday, but on March 6 and March 13 extra “navigators” come to Gifford to help even more people sign-up in advance of a March 15 deadline.

Diabetes Education ExpoGifford’s annual Diabetes Education Expo is merged with a Health Fair for all chronically ill and offered on March 14.

Gifford holds its 108th Annual Meeting of its corporators, announcing achievements of 2013, unveiling a new video about Gifford, and hearing a special presentation from Green Mountain Care Board Chairman Al Gobeille. Corporators elected Matt Considine of Randolph to the board and re-elect Lincoln Clark of Gifford corporatorsRoyalton. Grants were announced, including $25,000 in William and Mary Markle Community Foundation funds to 10 area towns’ schools to support exercise and healthy eating programs. The Philip D. Levesque Memorial Community Award, in memory of Gifford’s late president, is awarded to the Orange County Parent Child Center.

Gifford staff raise $520 for the March of Dimes by wearing “Blue Jeans for Babies”.

April VanderveerGifford’s mammography and nuclear medicine departments earn three-year, national re-accreditations from the American College of Radiology.

Certified nurse-midwife and women’s health nurse practitioner April Vanderveer joins Gifford’s 24-hour midwifery team.

Bill Brainard Avoided Surgery, Thanks to an Interventional Radiology Procedure

This article appeared in our Spring 2013 Update publication.

Bill Brainard of Bethel

Bill Brainard of Bethel poses with his skidder. Thanks to interventional radiology at Gifford, he is back to logging.

A year ago Bill Brainard of Bethel was in so much back pain he visited his doctor, Milt Fowler at Gifford in Randolph, for help.

“I’ve got a high tolerance for pain, but the day I was at this office, it was so bad it would almost bring tears to your eyes,” says Bill, who worked in excavation and trucking. “It hurt like heck.”

Bill had an MRI to determine the cause of his back pain. The MRI revealed a cyst in the spinal canal, which was pushing on the nerve roots that serve the legs. Surgery was an option, but is fairly invasive. A non-surgical interventional radiology procedure at Gifford – a
percutaneous rupture of the synovial cyst – seemed like a better option.

Using CT image guidance, radiologist Dr. John McIntyre accessed the cyst through the facet joint – the joint causing the cyst – and injected sterile saline, causing the cyst to fill and burst. Bill was awake for the procedure, which he called fairly painless.

When the cyst ruptured, he felt immediate relief.

“I don’t think I was in there a total of two hours,” Bill recalls. “I went right back to doing everything. It was amazing.”

Bill, 69, is now retired from the excavation business, but keeps busy logging. A year later, he is still pain-free.