Harriet Chase Brings ‘Photo-Art’ to Gifford Gallery

Harriet Chase, Bulldozer

A bulldozer dangles in this 2007 photo of new bridge construction in Randolph. Provided by Harriet Chase

RANDOLPH – Randolph resident and historian Harriet Chase brings her love of the area to the Gifford Medical Center art gallery Jan. 30-March 27 with a show of local photographs.

She is calling the show “photo-art” after learning to apply graphics to her photographs.

“I first learned computer graphics and was pleased with the simple effects that a few enhancements could give to a really nice photograph,” Chase says. “None of these enhancements ever overpower the image itself, but subtle actions that perhaps highlight an area, a frame consistent with the picture or a computer ‘matting’ make a good photograph all the nicer.” Continue reading

Gifford Gets Nod from District 3 Environmental Commission on Soils Issue

Proposed senior living community before Randolph Development
Review Board next, final phase of Act 250 filing expected soonsenior citizens

RANDOLPH – In an exciting reversal, the District 3 Environmental Commission on Jan. 3 awarded Gifford Medical Center a long-sought partial approval for a planned senior living community in Randolph Center.
The commission granted Gifford approval on an Act 250 criterion regarding construction on primary agriculture soils, clearing the way for the Randolph-based medical center to move forward with filing for the final phases of Act 250 review next month.

“We’re very happy. This is great news. The favorable ruling by Act 250 will allow us to move forward with one of the most important aspects of the project,” said hospital Administrator Joseph Woodin. Continue reading

South Royalton Family Welcomes First Baby of New Year at Gifford

Gifford Medical Center

Mom Sara Bowen, big sister Cassidy Sedor and dad Shawn Sedor, all of South Royalton, cuddle their newest family member – Kaydence Sedor, born on Jan. 2 at Gifford Medical Center and the Randolph hospital’s first baby of the new year.

RANDOLPH – Sara Bowen and fiancé Shawn Sedor of South Royalton were the first to welcome a baby in the new year at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph.

Bowen gave birth to daughter, Kaydence Sedor, on Jan. 2 at 10:29 p.m. A gorgeous and healthy Kaydence weighed in at 7 pounds 12 ounces and is 20 ½ inches long.

She is the couple’s second child. Two-year-old Cassidy Sedor was also born at Gifford.

The family was excited to have the first baby of the new year. “It’s really cool, actually,” said Bowen, but they were more excited with the newest member of their family, regardless of her birthdate.

“I’m lost for words. I love my kids. They’re amazing. (There’s) nothing better than to have kids,” said Bowen, who was originally due to give birth on Dec. 28.

Gifford Medica Center“We’ve got another little one to add to the family. (Kaydence) has someone to look up to and (Cassidy) has someone to take care of,” added Shawn. “I’m just glad that she’s healthy. We are lucky to have this blessing in our life.”

Unique Kari Meyer Landscape Paintings In Gifford Gallery

Gifford Medical Center

This photo shows one of Kari Meyer’s paintings now on display in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery. Called “Morning Meadow,” it is acrylic on canvas and painted on Beaver Meadow Road in Marshfield.

Montpelier painter Kari Meyer’s unique landscapes are in the Gifford Medical Center art gallery through Jan. 30.

Born and raised in the Northeast Kingdom, Meyer’s love of nature started at an early age. She spent much of her childhood playing in the woods and rivers near her rural home.

She attended high school at St. Johnsbury Academy. The school offered in-depth classes in art and Meyer says she fell in love with acrylic painting. She went on to earn an associate degree in multimedia and graphic design from Champlain College and then her bachelor’s degree in studio art from the University of Vermont.

Her knowledge of graphic design, she says, continues to be integrated into her artwork. Her studies at UVM also sparked an interest in sculpture. On close inspection, viewers of Meyer’s work can see her love of texture and three dimensions.

“As an artist I see art as a form of communication that has a power beyond that of words. Through imagery I attempt to portray ideas that words cannot, like the archetypal beauty that connects all things,” Meyer says. “I attempt to create a positive experience for the viewer, while also hoping to make a positive commentary on the world.”

Meyer works from photographs. She estimates a third of her time creating a painting is spent in the woods and walking the back roads of Vermont in search of the places that portray the magic and beauty of the landscape.

She works in digital photography, using a computer to alter colors, lighting and even composition of some of her images. By incorporating different textures and materials into her paintings, she creates an even more dynamic image that changes with lighting, casting its own shadows and creating a depth and mystery within each image.

Meyer says her imagery demonstrates an abstraction of nature, with her inspiration coming in part from the ideals of wabi-sabi, a prominent philosophy of Japanese aesthetics.

“For me wabi-sabi changes the worldview of Western civilization. Things we normally view as negative become beautiful. Loneliness, old age and death become beautiful because they are inevitable and represent the constant flux of the universe,” Meyer says. “I attempt to address this idea of the movement of eternity, of everything either coming from or returning to nothingness. My work urges the viewer to contemplate the relationship between oneself, nature and the universe.”

See Meyer’s work for yourself at Gifford. The show is free and open to the public. The gallery is just inside the main entrance of the medical center, located south of Randolph village. For directions and more information, visit www.giffordmed.org.  Learn more about Meyer’s work online at www.karimeyer.com.

Couple Travels from Armenia to Give Birth at Gifford

Married couple Elvira Dana and Jason Kass live and work in Armenia, a developing country once part of the Soviet Union.  When it came time to have children, however, Dana and Kass looked outside of Armenia for care.

Couple Travels From Armenia To Give Birth At Gifford

Elvira Dana and Jason Kass hold 3-year-old Gideon and newborn Natalie at a family home in Northfield. The married couple has come home to Vermont from Armenia – traveling for 36 hours – to have both their children at Gifford Medical Center.

They looked to Dana’s native Vermont, specifically Gifford Medical Center in Randolph.

For each of their child’s births – first Gideon three years ago and then Natalie late last month – the family flew back to Vermont.

“When Gideon came along we decided very quickly we needed to be back in the U.S. for the birth,” says Dana, who grew up in Northfield and was one of Gifford’s early Birthing Center patients nearly 35 years ago.

Couple Travels From Armenia To Give Birth At Gifford

She got her prenatal care – such that it was – in Armenia and e-mailed test results and information to Gifford’s team of certified nurse-midwives.  “They were willing to be flexible about some pretty strange pre-natal care,” says Dana, noting some documents sent had been translated from Russian and Armenian.

At 36 weeks of pregnancy (the latest point in a pregnancy that women are recommended to fly and often the latest point an airline will allow a pregnant woman in the air) Dana, with Kass at her side, traveled the 36 hours home.  Gifford childbirth education and lactation consultant Nancy Clark provided the couple a crash course in birthing.

Gideon was born the morning after that final birthing class.  He arrived two weeks early and just two-and-a-half hours after Dana made it to the hospital.

Hurricane Sandy this year delayed the family’s flight and Dana ended up flying – a bit nervously – at 37 weeks.  But Natalie was patient, arriving on Nov. 26, one day after her due date and about an hour and forty-five minutes after the family made it to the hospital.

Couple Travels From Armenia To Give Birth At Gifford

In both instances, says the couple, the atmosphere, low-intervention birth experience, and friendliness of staff were exactly what the family was seeking.

“Nobody was stressed.  It was so calm.  It was just us, a midwife and a nurse with no beeping noises.  Everyone we interacted with was so kind, including the cleaning and food services staff,” Dana says.

Pediatrician Dr. Lou DiNicola – Dana’s pediatrician growing up – checked on both babies following their births.  The children have both gotten their pediatric care at Gifford while they’re in the state.  And in fact, they even called Gifford, reaching Dr. DiNicola as the on-call pediatrician, when Gideon spiked a high fever in Armenia and the couple didn’t know what to do, says Kass, 37 and formerly of Randolph Center.

Couple Travels From Armenia To Give Birth At Gifford

It is the consistency of the care provided at Gifford, says Dana, that gives the couple the confidence to fly in and give birth with a midwife they may never have met or entrust their child’s care with a pediatrician who may not be a familiar face.

“Mostly we just feel so incredibly lucky,” says Dana, cradling her newborn.Couple Travels From Armenia To Give Birth At Gifford

Service through the Peace Corps first took Dana to Armenia in 2005.  Putting her master’s degree in teaching English as a second language to work, she taught English and trained teachers.  She then was hired as Armenia country director of American Councils, a non-profit that administers U.S. State Department and international educational programs, including student exchanges.

Jason joined her in Armenia in 2008, working in the scant Armenia job market and for meager Armenian wages as a head gardener at a renovated public park.

Presently staying with family in Northfield, the couple and their now two children will fly back to Armenia on Feb. 4.  Natalie will need a passport before they can go.  Bilingual young Gideon is on his second passport, having already filled one in his three years of life.

The family hopes to make Vermont their permanent home one day again soon – at least by the time Gideon will start school.

Couple Travels From Armenia To Give Birth At Gifford

The Kass family plays together. They are in Vermont from Armenia to have their latest child, newborn Natalie, at Gifford Medical Center’s Birthing Center.

Bowling for Breast Cancer

For a third year, Teresa Bradley of Braintree and Krista Warner of Randolph have organized a bowling tournament at Valley Bowl to support Gifford Medical Center’s Woman to Woman fund.

Held each year on the fourth Sunday in October, the Ruth Brown Memorial Breast Cancer Awareness Tournament raised $1,485 and attracted 32 bowlers. The winning bowler was Shawn Corbett of Rochester. The top fund-raiser was Barre’s Diana Flood. Also recognized were Bob’s M&M, Patrick’s Place and Valley Bowl, all of Randolph, for donating the top three prizes at each annual tournament.

The tournament, which started in 2010 as Warner’s high school senior project, is named in memory of Bradley’s mother and Warner’s grandmother, who was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993 following a mammogram. She beat the disease but later developed lung cancer, passing away in Gifford’s Garden Room last year. For Warner and Bradley, the tournament is a way to keep her memory alive and support a cause about which they feel strongly.

Gifford’s Woman to Woman fund helps provide mammograms to low-income women and funds soft pads placed on the mammography machine to make essential mammograms more comfortable for all.

bowling for breast cancer

Here Bradley, left, and Warner, middle, present the money they raised to Gifford Breast Care Coordinator Cheryl Jewkes in the Randolph hospital’s stereotactic breast biopsy room.

bowling for breast cancer

Here Bradley and Warner stand with Gifford Breast Care Coordinator Cheryl Jewkes by the Randolph hospital’s digital mammography machine.

bowling for breast cancer

Here Bradley, Warner and Gifford Breast Care Coordinator Cheryl Jewkes, standing in the Randolph hospital’s digital mammography room, feign surprise at the thick stack of money raised.

Career Exploration Week: November 13-16, 2012

Preparing Students for the Next Stages of Their Lives

Career WeekRUHS Student Services is hosting a Focus on Careers week for all students November 13-16.

Throughout the week, professionals from a wide range of occupations and organizations will give “lunch talks” to students who are interested in learning more about particular careers. Students may sign-up to attend any workshops they are interested in.

For each presentation a student attends, he/she will receive a raffle ticket to win local prizes such as gift certificates, VTC clothing, RUHS athletic gear, etc.

Our Obstetrician/Gynecologist Dr. Dina Levin was responsible for getting so many Gifford people involved. She wants kids to know and understand the variety of health care careers available – some medical, many not.

Here is a list of this year’s speakers.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Lyndley Mittler: Preschool Teacher, Warren Elementary School
Dina Levin: Obstetrician/Gynecologist, Gifford Medical Center
MaryKay Dreher: Academic Coordinator, Community College of Vermont
Anne Bridges: Registered Nurse, Gifford Medical Center
Mark McDonough: Firefighter, Burlington City Fire Department

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
Amy Harris: Psychologist, Private Practice, Montpelier, VT
Nicolas Benoit: Podiatrist, Gifford Medical Center
Ed Striebe: Chef, Gifford Medical Center

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Emma Shumann: Project Coordinator, Gifford Medical Center
Samantha Medved: Social Worker, Gifford Medical Center
Tammy Hooker: Graphic Design/Marketing, Gifford Medical Center
Geoffrey Schaubhut: Ph.D. Candidate in Neuroscience, UVM
Kathy MacAskill: Medical Laboratory Technician, Gifford Medical Center

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16
Winthrop Smith Jr.: CEO Sugarbush Mountain Resort, Warren, VT
LaRae Francis: Project Manager, Gifford Medical Center
Tyson Moulton: Director of Facilities, Gifford Medical Center
TC Webb: Film/Media, RTCC
Ryan Dreimiller: Art Direction/Graphic Design, Green Mountain Coffee Roasters

Phil Scott’s Visit

arrival of Phil Scott

Lt. Gov. Phil Scott arrives at Gifford on Tuesday (Photo provided by Robin Palmer)

In the final day of his “Cycling Vermont’s 14” 500-mile bicycle tour of the state’s 14 counties, Lt. Gov. Phil Scott stopped at Gifford Medical Center in Randolph early Tuesday afternoon.

Scott, who is seeking re-election next month, was met by a small group of Gifford employees and community supporters. Scott briefly talked fitness as vital to good health, and safety. On the first day of his journey he encountered railroad tracks and cracked his helmet, he said.

On the last day, with a new helmet securely in place, his visit to Gifford led to an impromptu tour of the medical center’s Menig Extended Care Facility nursing home, which Gifford is trying to rebuild in Randolph Center as part of a senior living community.

Scott, riding with John Connor, was scheduled to conclude his eight-day journey on the chilly Tuesday in Barre at 5:30 p.m. Continue reading

National Health Service Corps Helping to Bring Primary Care Providers to Under-Served Areas

The National Health Service Corps’ Corps Community Day is this Thursday, October 11th.  Click here to find out more.

RANDOLPH – When Dr. Josh Plavin was in medical school, a federal program supporting primary care providers, the National Health Service Corps, helped pay for some of his education costs.

“I was a National Health Service Corps scholar,” Dr. Plavin notes.

Upon graduation, the program required that he work two years at a National Health Service Corps approved site in a designated primary care shortage area. Dr. Plavin looked to rural Vermont.

“At the time there were no designated sites in Vermont with job openings,” says Dr. Plavin, who worked with his employer of choice – Gifford Medical Center – to have the Chelsea Health Center designated as an approved site. The site was approved in part because neighboring Tunbridge was, and still is, defined as a primary care shortage area.

That was in 2001 and Dr. Plavin served the Chelsea area as both a pediatrician and internal medicine provider for the next seven years.

Today, Dr. Plavin serves as medical director of all of Gifford’s primary care practice locations – in Berlin, Bethel, Chelsea, Randolph and Rochester. As such, he sees the benefit of the federal program from new eyes – that of a hospital administrator trying to staff primary care practices in rural areas.

“Medical school is so expensive that there are fewer and fewer doctors going into primary care because the simple math is it is not viable without loan repayment. It’s certainly not viable in a rural area,” says Dr. Plavin on what nationally is Corps Community Day, held today during National Primary Care Week.

Continue reading

Norwich University Concert Band Coming to Gifford Park Sept. 25

 

RANDOLPH – The nation’s oldest collegiate band, the Norwich University Concert Band, will perform at the park at Gifford Medical Center on Sept. 25 from 6:30-7:30 p.m.

The free concert, titled “Autumn in the Park,” will be led by conductor Lt. Col. Todd Edwards with a flute solo, “Concertino for Flute,” featuring Audrey Seaman.

Music at Norwich University in Northfield has been a significant part of the curriculum since its founding in 1819. With the arrival of William Baylay, the first professor of instrumental music, in 1823, the band became all-brass and an integral part of the daily life of cadets.

Today, the band is a full instrumentation band with woodwinds, brass and percussion, and it continues to perform in support of the Corps of Cadets at all formations, reviews and special parades. The band has performed for the inauguration of several U.S. presidents, including John Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush, as well as for parades and concerts throughout Vermont and New England.

Conductor Lt. Col. Edwards spent nearly 25 years in the U.S. Air Force Band program, serving as a trombonist and vocalist as well as an audio engineer and lighting designer, after enlisting at age 18.

He received the Air Force Public Affairs Awards for Senior Noncommissioned Officer of the Year in 2001 for designing and executing a seven-band deployment throughout Europe in 48 hours supporting Operation Allied Force, including a short concert aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt – a first for Air Force Bands while in an active combat zone.

Because of his vast deployment expertise, he was selected by the Pentagon to advance the first-ever band deployments in direct support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom, during combat operations. Being the first bandsman on the ground in April of 2004, he led bands traveling to seven bases in Iraq, Qatar and Afghanistan and later led a second deployment group to perform additional shows in Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Djibouti.

In addition to performing before U.S. presidents, he has played before several heads of state, including Queen Elizabeth II.

The concert is free and open to the public.

Valley Bowl of Randolph will be onsite with its food truck for anyone wanting to purchase dinner.

Bring a blanket or a lawn chair. The Gifford park is south of the hospital, before the Thrift Shop, at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Ample parking is available.

The concert is weather dependent. If the weather is questionable, visit Gifford’s Web site, www.giffordmed.org, for updates.