Two Cups of Comfort: Diagnostic Imaging and Inpatient Care

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Ben Cronan

Radiology technologist Ben Cronan, Donna Baker and nurse Shane Parks

Donna Baker is a cancer and MRSA survivor. Unable to walk, she also has COPD. These conditions have meant considerable hospital time for Donna. Of her time spent at Gifford, two faces are particularly memorable: inpatient nurse Shane Parks and radiology technologist Ben Cronan.

“Shane is a very good nurse. He’s very thorough and you feel confident when you’re with him … . When I would have trouble breathing, it would scare me and he would stay there until I calmed down.”

“Ben, I pick on him. When I would need chest X-rays, I would be on a stretcher. He would get right on up on the stretcher. He would like give me a hug around my arms and pull me forward, so (an image receptor could be placed under) me.”
~ Donna Baker

One Teaspoon of Assurance: Phlebotomy

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Gifford phlebotomy

Thirteen-year-old Tucker Riley of Randolph has Down Syndrome and as a result, Graves’ disease, an overactive thyroid condition requiring frequent blood checks. He also has small veins, explains his mom Kate Porter. Tucker struggled with having his blood drawn for years, until the gentle touch and quick work of phlebotomist Charlene Baker alleviated his fears. For years now, the family always asks for Charlene when it is time to draw Tucker’s blood, Kate says.

“Charlene is so competent. Things happen on the first stick. It happens. It’s done. And she’s also just very friendly, and it’s painless. She remembers Tucker. It’s just kind of like having a personal friend there drawing blood every time we go over.”  ~ Kate Porter

Gifford phlebotomy

Phlebotomist Charlene Baker and Tucker Riley

An Extra Cup of Care: Menig

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Menig

Gloria Tatro and Marion Currier have known each other for decades. Gloria was a resident at the Tranquility Nursing Home where Marion was a licensed nursing assistant before Tranquility closed and both came to Menig. Dawn Abdel-Fatah works for Upper Valley Services and spends a couple days a week with Gloria and sees the extra effort Marion makes.

If Gloria wants popcorn, Marion buys her a bag out of the hospital vending machine after work. If Gloria, who makes beaded necklaces, needs extra supplies, Marion picks them up for her.

“She’s just very kind. She cares about the way she looks, her hair, her clothes. She takes her time.”  ~ Dawn Abdel-Fatah

Marion Currier

LNA Marion Currier, Gloria Tatro and Dawn Abdel-Fatah

A Dash of Friendship: Patient Registration

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

a dash of friendship

When 79-year-old Judy Harding fell in her kitchen, her neighbor gave her a ride to the Emergency Department, but she didn’t have a way to get home. Then she thought of someone she knew who would help her – Marcelo Reyes from Patient Registration. Marcelo hurried to get his car from the employee lot, drove her home, saw her inside, gave her his cell phone number in case she ever needed him, and shoveled her slippery walkway.

“Gifford has become my version of Cheers. Everybody knows my name. It’s the place I go for comfort and friendship. Marcelo and I have become sort of pals. I really like him a lot and he has been very good to me. He’s just a pleasure, and he smiles.”  ~ Judy Harding

Gifford patient registration

Patient registration receptionist Marcelo Reyes and Judy Harding

One Teaspoon of Thoughtfulness: Community Clinics

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

one teaspoon of thoughtfulness

Phyllis and Roland Potter, 81 and 83 respectively, have been going to the Bethel Health Center since it opened. First the Sharon couple saw Dr. Ronald Gadway. They now see Dr. Mark Seymour. But another smiling face that greets them is just as impactful as their primary caregiver. That person is medical secretary Kathy Benson, says Phyllis.

“I’ve known Kathy since she was a little girl. We know her parents. She’s a very thoughtful girl. She’s a sweetheart. If I needed help out to the car, she’d be there in a minute. She would help anyone in a minute.”  ~ Phyllis Potter

Gifford medical secretary Kathy Benson

Medical secretary Kathy Benson with Phyllis and Roland Potter

Roll in Excellence: Materials Management

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

roll in excellence

When a patient arrives for surgery, they see doctors and nurses, but it takes a much bigger, behind-the-scenes team to ensure the operating room is ready to provide care. Materials Management, which purchases supplies and handles deliveries for the entire medical center, is one department that is especially vital, says Surgical Services Nurse Manager Jamie Floyd.

“Every single thing we do relies on specialized equipment and tools. Nearly all of this equipment is either disposable or has a disposable component. Materials Management provides excellent service and handles the complex logistics of ensuring that we have the items we need, when we need them.”  ~ Jamie Floyd

Gifford materials management department

Materials clerks Tina Brady and Alice Whittington, surgery nurse manager Jamie Floyd, shipping and receiving clerk Josh Fahnestock, and purchasing specialist Teresa Bradley.

One Large Serving of Smiles: Room Service

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

one large serving of smiles

Jane Currier of Randolph Center spent weeks at Gifford, including Thanksgiving and Christmas, after a fall where she injured her head and fractured her shoulder. A bright spot in the 84-year-old’s day were meal deliveries by Simon Leong of the Food and Nutrition Services team. Both remember the day they met well.

“Who are you?” Jane recalls Simon asking. “I said, ‘I’m Jane.’ And he said, ‘I’m Tarzan.’ And we kept it up. He’s very friendly. He never forgets names. He’s somebody to talk to. He’s funny. He’s a character. I think I’ll keep him and take him home.”  ~ Jane Currier

Gifford cook Simon Leong

Cook Simon Leong and Jane Currier

A Cup of Compassion: Volunteer Profile

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

a cup of compassion

During a trip to Hawaii in April of 2000, Irene Schaefer’s husband fell, hit his head, and died two days later at Queens Medical Center in Honolulu. Irene was completely alone, except for the chaplaincy volunteers at the hospital who sat with her during her husband’s final two days.

“It was traumatic and sad, but those people kept me going,” says Irene.

Just a month later, back in Randolph, a local reverend with the help of a team of area churchgoers started the volunteer chaplaincy program at Gifford. It was too soon for Irene, a local resident, but when a second training was scheduled that November, Irene signed up. “I had to get out and give back because of what I had been given in Hawaii.”

In the more than decade since, this now 85-year-old has made Gifford her “second home.” “It’s very rewarding. I get more out of it than I give,” she says.

She comes several times a month to spend a couple of hours visiting with patients. When a patient is dying, Irene offers a prayer “for a calm and smooth transition.” Mostly, though, she listens. “Everybody has a story,” she says.

She is often the person called in the night to comfort a patient or family in the Emergency Department.

For Irene, it is not her first “job” or even her first volunteer job. From New Jersey, Irene was a church secretary for years. Upon moving to Randolph 40 years ago, she worked at DuBois and King as the “girl Friday” distributing mail, developing photos in a dark room and operating the business’ first computer, which was roughly the size of Gifford’s chapel, she recalls. She went on to do computer work for a local accountant, until retiring in 1991. A decade of volunteering at White River Valley Ambulance in billing followed.

At WRVA, Irene chased down patients and insurance companies for payments.

At Gifford, the only payment a soft spoken, elegant and humorous Irene is seeking is peace of mind.

“I think I could write a book. The experiences have been from very humorous to very sad. I have had a marriage proposal,” she says with a laugh. “I’ve also been in the Garden Room (for end-of-life patients). I don’t want to say it’s my favorite place, but it’s a place where I feel comfortable, when some of the other (volunteers) do not, because I have been there personally, and I totally admire our palliative care system.”

That admiration and an ongoing need for a comforting hand and listening ear will keep Irene volunteering with Gifford’s chaplaincy program as long as she’s able.

“I look at it as a need. It’s a need that’s being fulfilled, which doesn’t happen at all hospitals. It’s part of Gifford’s outreach and caring and the reason why patients want to be here.”

Irene Schaefer

Irene Schaefer

One Heaping Teaspoon of Heart: Cardiac Rehabilitation

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Janet Kittredge

Janet Kittredge and cardiac rehabilitation nurse Annette Petrucelli

After having a stent placed in her heart, Janet Kittredge of Hancock did cardiac rehabilitation at Gifford. She was nervous to start, and then reluctant to leave.

“I love those ladies. They became friends and I couldn’t wait to get back to see them. I just thought they were such happy, positive people. They had (us) all feeling motivated and they made (us) all feel safe and secure … . We talked about all kinds of personal things. It was really fun. Anyone who was there was glad to come back and in no hurry to leave.”
~ Janet Kittredge

A New Home for All Rehabilitation, Billing

occupational therapist Ann Brunelle

This article was featured in our Spring 2014 Update Community Newsletter.

The Kingwood Health Center in Randolph underwent an expansion in the fall that both improved the Route 66 health center and freed up needed space at Gifford’s downtown campus.

The addition was completed in November and over the winter several Gifford departments made the move to the impressive, new space. Those departments included:

  • Occupational and speech therapies, which joined outpatient physical therapy on the ground floor of Kingwood
  • Billing
  • Accounting

The move of occupational and speech therapies creates a full-spectrum, multidisciplinary rehabilitation center at Kingwood. Added is some gym space, six new exam rooms and improved staff areas.

“Everyone loves the new building,” notes Megan Sault, the rehabilitation department’s operations coordinator.

Having all rehabilitation services in one, convenient location has reduced confusion among patients as to where they should go for their appointment and allows for a collaborative approach to care.

“It’s really great to be so close to team members and share this beautiful facility,” says speech therapist Kathy Carver, who on the day we visited was meeting with patient Terry White of Randolph Center. Terry, who had a stroke, had also seen physical therapy that day, allowing him to make just one trip to Kingwood, and allowing collaboration on Terry’s care.

For others the new location near Interstate 89 is just convenient.

Occupational therapy patient Michael Dempsey of Brookfield was recovering from a broken arm that had left him with shoulder pain. “It’s nice, got a lot of room and is closer to my house. It’s convenient,” Michael remarked.

On the top floor is new office space for accounting as well as billing, or what the medical center calls patient financial services. This is where patients can go to pay their bills or make billing inquiries.

To find the billing office, park in the upper drive and use the door on the left. There are signs inside.

Gifford first bought the Kingwood building in 2007 as an opportunity to expand services. Initially the flat-roofed, dark structure underwent renovations. The new addition seamlessly expanded the structure toward the wood-line.

Also located at the health center are Gifford’s Blueprint Community Health Team, mental health practitioner Cory Gould, the Diabetes Clinic and a private practice dentist, Dr. John Westbrook – all on the top floor.

Call the health center at 728-7100 and listen for options for reaching the various departments.

Health Connections caseworker Michele Packard remains at the main medical center. Michele provides patients help accessing insurance and free care options. (Go in the main entrance at Gifford’s main campus and look for signs to find Michele.)