Gifford Offers ‘Home Alone and Safe’ Course for Kids May 23

home alone courseWellness educator Jude Powers will offer “Home Alone and Safe,” a course for children ages 8-11 on Saturday, May 23, from 9:30 a.m. to noon in Gifford’s Family Center (next to Ob/Gyn and Midwifery).

Designed by chapters of the American Red Cross to meet the needs of children who spend time without adult supervision, this course will help them understand rules and responsibilities, and to anticipate and resolve potential problems.

Participants will learn how to safely respond to a variety of home alone situations, including:

• Internet safety
• Family communications
• Telephone safety
• Sibling care
• Personal safety
• Gun safety
• Basic emergency care

The morning class will include role play, brainstorming, and watching a video on the topic. Each child will take home a workbook and handouts, and earn a certificate upon completion.

“Home Alone and Safe” will be held at Gifford‘s Family Center space at the hospital on Route 12 (South Main Street) in Randolph. The Family Center is beside Gifford Ob/Gyn and Midwifery. Please register with instructor Jude Powers at (802) 649-1841. The cost is $15.

Schulte Exhibit at Gifford Medical Center’s Art Gallery

Lynn Schulte

“Remembrance,” on display in the Gifford Medical Center Gallery, is part of a series artist Lynn Schulte created to celebrate the memory of her mother.

Georgetown, MA artist Lynne Schulte will be exhibiting her paintings in the Gifford Medical Center Art Gallery from May 5th through June 10th, 2015.

The exhibit displays selections from “Remembrance – the Pink Chair Project,” and images inspired by the coastal beauty of New England. Her floral cards and book, Remembrance, will be available in the gift shop.

Schulte has exhibited her work in solo shows in New Hampshire, Vermont, Kansas, Maine, New York, Massachusetts, and Washington DC. Primary among her themes are coastal views and landscapes of Vermont, Maine, and Massachusetts.

Notable series included “A Year in Bloom” when she produced 365 smaller paintings of flowers in oil and watercolor, shown at the AVA gallery in Lebanon, NH. This series was followed by “Fresh Bloom,” consisting of 15 larger floral works, shown at the Latham Library in Thetford, VT. A “Coastal Sunrise” body of work was shown at the Marblehead Arts Association.

“Remembrance – the Pink Chair Project” celebrated the memory of the artist’s mother in moving and beautiful images and was shown in 14 venues over 3 years. Each painting has a story, told in her accompanying book, and these enrich the experience for the viewer. Lynne’s current body of work is a series on the Working Waterfront.

She has taught and has been an art education administrator in Maryland, Vermont, and Massachusetts, and currently teaches private lessons in her studio, specializing in color, painting, and college portfolio development. Schulte holds a BS from Nazareth College of Rochester, NY; an MFA from Antioch University; and a CAGS from Vermont College of the Union Institute and University.

Currently living in Georgetown, MA, Schulte has ties to Vermont from her tenure at as art teacher and Fine Arts Department Chair at Woodstock Union High School. She is married to Thomas LaValley, who was born in Burlington, VT and is a Vermont Distinguished Principal from his many years in educational leadership. Lynne and Tom frequently visit Vermont to be with friends and family.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through June 10, 2015. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Space that Speeds the Healing Process

One patient per hospital room is good medicine. Here’s why…

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

individual hospital rooms

Semi-private rooms offer little privacy or space for patients, their families and
hospital staff. Private patient rooms will alleviate the overcrowding that is typical of shared rooms.

The reality of a shared hospital room is that you don’t get to choose your roommate.

“We do our best to match up personalities and scenarios and illnesses and infection issues,” says Alison White, vice president of the hospital division, “but there are things like having a roommate who is a night owl and you like to be in bed by 7:30. If we need a bed and your room happens to be that one empty bed, you get who you get.”

The new reality at Gifford is that every hospital patient will soon have a room of their own as part of a construction project that received its final okay in October 2013. In spring 2015, when 30-bed Menig Extended Care moves to Randolph Center, the hospital will begin converting the vacated wing. The number of rooms for hospital patients will double while the number of hospital beds—25—remains the same, a ratio that guarantees maximum comfort and safety. The renovations are also an opportunity to open up ceilings, replace old systems, and improve energy efficiency.

“When patients are recovering from surgery or from illness, they want what they want,” says Rebecca O’Berry, vice president of operations and the surgical division.

“Sharing a room with somebody else just doesn’t work for most patients. From the surgeon’s point of view, if I’ve just replaced your total hip, the last thing I want is for you to be in a room with someone who might be brewing an infection.”

White names several other factors, besides the risk of infection, that have helped make private rooms the standard in hospitals today. Among them:

Faster healing: Studies show that patients who are in private rooms need less pain medication because they’re in a more soothing environment. If your roommate has IV pumps that are going off, or the nurse has to check your neighbor every one or two hours—which is very common—the lights go on, the blood pressure machine goes off, the nurse has to speak with the person in the bed next to you. With private rooms, all that is removed.

Ease of movement: Our rooms were built before the current technology existed. IV poles didn’t exist. We now have people with two or three pumps. With today’s technology there’s no room to move around. When you have two of everything—two chairs, two overbed tables, two wastebaskets—it creates an obstacle course.

Better doctor-patient communication: As professionals, we don’t always get the whole story because the patient doesn’t want to be overheard by his neighbor.

Patient satisfaction: Larger rooms, each with a bathroom, will give patients additional privacy and enhance the patient experience. It’s a win-win for everybody.

Gifford Staff Raise Money for March of Dimes

Blue Jeans for Babies fundraiser

Roger Clapp and JoEllen Calderara from March of Dimes in Vermont, receive check from Ellen Fox, RN, and Kim Summers, Birthing Center assistant nurse manager. The check was for $505 in employee donations to Blue Jeans for Babies day, and Gifford’s sponsorship of the CVT March for Babies in May.

More than 100 Gifford Medical Center employees raised $505 for the March of Dimes by wearing “Blue Jeans for Babies” to work on Friday, March 20, 2015.

Each March the Randolph medical center and its outlying health clinics participate in the fund-raiser, which allows employees who donate $5 to the March of Dimes to wear jeans to work for the day. The March of Dimes is the nation’s leading non-profit organization for pregnancy and baby health. It raises funds through a variety of events to help prevent birth defects, premature births, and infant mortality.

Roger Clapp, executive director of the March of Dimes in Vermont, thanked hospital employees for their participation in the fund-raiser and – as a medical center with a renowned Birthing Center – for their work toward healthy births.

“The March of Dimes recognizes the care and commitment to excellence among the Gifford team that contributes to Vermont’s national lead in preventing premature birth. We’re particularly thankful to be able to reinvest the staff’s fund-raising proceeds to give every baby in Vermont a healthier start,” Clapp said.

Gifford Birthing Center Assistant Nurse Manager Karen Summers and RN Ellen Fox presented the check to Clapp and Jo Ellen Calderara of March of Dimes in Vermont.

Gifford is also a sponsor of the Central Vermont March for Babies walk on Sunday, May 3, 2015 at Montpelier High School. Sign-up online at or by calling 802-560-3239.

Recognizing Employee Commitment

Annual Employee Awards

The following article appeared in our 2014 Annual Report.

Members of our Gifford family were recognized at the Employee Awards Banquet on October 18 at Vermont Technical College for their years of service. (Employees are recognized in five-year increments.)

Congratulations to these individuals and thank you to all for your dedication and service.

annual Gifford employee awards

Diane Alves
Teresa Bradley
Amy Chiriatti
Eric Christensen
James Currie
Tammy Dempsey
Lyle Farnham
David Gehlbach
Tammy Gerdes
Marjorie Gewirz
Thom Goodwin
Lindsay Haupt
Cathy Jacques
Thomas Maylin
Megan McKinstry
Loretta Miller
Michael Minchin
Susan Moore
Megan O’Brien
Martha Palmer
Heather Pejouhy
Rella Rice
Matthew Shangraw
Paul Smith
Meghan Sperry
Debra Stender
Thomas Young

Lori Barrett
Jamie Cushman
Amy Danley-White
Jennifer Davis
Nancy Davoll
Cynthia Legacy
Patricia Manning
Rhonda Schumann
Rebecca Jo Ward
Lisa Young

Kathrine Benson
Sadie Lyford
Shelley McDonald
Kathleen Paglia
Dessa Rogers
David Sanville
Linda Sprague
Joseph Woodin
Carol Young

Kenneth Borie
Louis DiNicola
Milton Fowler
Betsy Hannah
Jean Keyes
Cheryl McRae
David Pattison

Dawn Beriau
Karin Olson
Renee Pedersen
Kathi Pratt

Judith Santamore

DeHart Exhibit at Gifford Medical Center’s Art Gallery

“Expressions and Demeanors—Wildlife or Human?”

DeHart art exhibit

“Exuberance,” by Rochester photographer Barb Madsen DeHart

In the year since her last popular exhibit in the Gifford Gallery, Rochester VT photographer Barb Madsen DeHart has collected new photographs while travelling in Africa, The Galapagos, and Wapusk National Park in Manitoba, Canada.

The pieces in the current exhibit, “Expressions and Demeanors—Wildlife or Human?” reflect a change in her objective as a photographer.

“I’m no longer pursuing just ‘photo ops,’ to capture shots of wonderful creatures,” she said. “Rather my focus is on glimpsing how wildlife inadvertently presents itself to the outside world, recognizing their expressions and demeanors as interpreted, in this case, by me.”

The exhibit features 28 portraits—of Polar, Spirit, and Kodiak bears; penguins; fur seals; lions; elephants; and walrus—with a whimsical caption describing what each might be thinking.

One of the photographs, “Polar Bear Mom and Cub,” was selected to be a National Wildlife Federation holiday card for 2015. It is one in a series that shows a mother and her 3-month-old cub emerging from their den in spring.

“The interactions and expressions of new mom and ‘newbie’ made me forget the anxiety I felt as my camera froze, my tripod and camera blew over, and as I vainly tried to de-ice my camera lens, viewfinders, and goggles!” DeHart said.

DeHart has exhibited at the Chandler Art Gallery in Randolph, VT; Compass Arts in Brandon, VT; and at the Annual Photo Show and the Member’s Show, both in Waitsfield, Vermont.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through May 6, 2015. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Gifford’s Dr. Rob Rinaldi Honored

Podiatrist/sports medicine advocate celebrated for His 12 years at Sharon Health Center

Dr. Rob Rinaldi

Dr. Rinaldi

Gifford staff gathered on March 25 to celebrate podiatrist Dr. Rob Rinaldi’s 12 years of service to an expanding community of athletes, and to wish him well as he transitions to new roles in the organization.

The party featured a cake shaped like a foot, lots of foot jokes, and heartfelt stories about Rinaldi’s many contributions and roles at Gifford: as generous mentor, sports medicine advocate, surgeon, and the force behind the very successful Sharon Health Center and sports medicine clinic.

“I flunked the first time I retired!” Rinaldi quipped, explaining that he missed seeing patients when he left a thriving Connecticut practice and retired to his farm in Chelsea in 2000. So when Gifford Administrator Joe Woodin approached him about expanding sports medicine at Gifford, he was receptive: “I didn’t want to sound too anxious, so I said yes!”

Rinaldi helped design the first phase of the Sharon Health Center, which opened in 2005. By 2008 a 2,200 square foot expansion was added to accommodate the thriving sports medicine clinic, and a final planned 2,600 square foot expansion was added in 2014.

Today, athletes come from all over the Upper Valley to the center, which includes a physical therapy gym space; x-ray technology and mounted flat screens for reviewing radiological exams; physical therapy treatment rooms; and a state-of- the-art gait analysis system. The sports medicine team includes: Michael Chamberland, DC (chiropractic/sports medicine); Paul Smith, DPM (podiatry/sports medicine); Nat Harlow, DO; and Peter Loescher, MD (sports medicine); and a team of physical therapists.

“Rob brought years of business experience to the creation of Sharon Health Center,” Woodin said. “But he also brought his pride in what he does, and his entrepreneurial spirit to Gifford.”

The stories Rinaldi’s colleagues told described a generous and compassionate mentor: “Rob was the voice of wisdom, the one people came to when facing some sort of challenge,” said Vice President of Surgery Rebecca O’Berry.

Although he will no longer be seeing patients, Rinaldi will continue to serve on administrative committees at Gifford, and will work with residents at the new Menig Nursing Home when it opens this spring in Randolph Center.

Gifford Positioned for Changing Health Care Landscape

109th Annual Meeting celebrates forward-looking growth in programs and facility

Joe Woodin

Administrator Joe Woodin answers questions during Gifford Medical Center’s 109th Annual Meeting.

Nearly 100 community members gathered Saturday night for “Building for the Future,” Gifford Medical Center’s 109th Annual Corporators Meeting.

Reporting on an exciting and transformative year, administrators and board members highlighted the implementation of several long-term initiatives:

  • The new Menig Nursing Home, looking out over the green mountains in Randolph Center, will open—on time and on budget—mid-May 2015.
  • The hospital wing vacated by Menig will be converted into state-of-the-art private patient rooms to offer privacy for provider consultations and family visits, and to accommodate medical technology at the bedside.
  • A new organizational structure, created to reflect Gifford’s new Federal Qualified Health Center designation, will allow Gifford to offer enhanced preventative, dental, and behavioral health services to our patients.

“It’s been an extraordinary year,” Gifford Administrator Joe Woodin stated. “These initiatives strengthen the services we offer our patients and also position Gifford well for the future in an era of healthcare reform.”

Moving forward while making budget for the 15th consecutive year
After presenting the annual hospital report and a brief update on the uncertain state of Vermont’s healthcare policy, Woodin noted that Gifford has maintained ongoing fiscal stability while pushing ahead with these forward-looking initiatives. For the 15th consecutive year Gifford has made budget and achieved its state-approved operating margin. The culmination of years of research and planning, each of these new projects reflect Gifford’s commitment to providing quality community care for years to come.

New $5 million capital campaign launched
Lincoln Clark, board treasurer and co-chair of the “Vision for the Future” campaign, announced the launch of the public phase of the $5 million capital campaign.

“As of tonight this campaign is no longer silent,” Clark told the group. “It has been a remarkable experience—we started two and a half years ago with a vision, research, and a community survey. We decided then to wait until we raised 60 percent before going public, and we’ve exceeded that goal. We hope to reach the campaign’s $5 million goal by December 31st of this year.”

The “Vision for the Future” campaign supports the hospital’s conversion to industry-standard private patient rooms, and the construction of the new Menig Nursing home in Randolph Center. Menig, one of only twelve nursing homes in Vermont to retain a five-star rating from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, will anchor the new Morgan Orchards Senior Living Community in Randolph Center.

Panel presentation describes a Gifford ready for tomorrow’s healthcare needs
A panel presentation looked at four recently implemented changes that will help Gifford provide for future community healthcare needs:

  • Dr. Martin Johns, medical director for Gifford’s FQHC and hospital division, talked about building the behind-the-scenes administrative structure now in place that will help Gifford provide expanded preventative, dental, and behavioral health services as a Federally Qualified Health Center.
  • Dr. Lou DiNicola, pediatrician, described the challenges staff faced while transitioning to a federally mandated Electronic Medical Record system. Now that the transition is complete, the benefits are clear: greater efficiency and improved patient care.
  • Alison White, vice president of Patient Care Services, talked about how important private patient rooms are for provider consultations, improved patient care, and how they will help bring medical technology to patients’ bedside.
  • Linda Minsinger, executive director for the Gifford Retirement Community, talked about plans for the new Morgan Orchard Senior Living Community in Randolph Center.

Gifford scholarships and awards presented
Bailey Fay was awarded the Dr. Richard J. Barrett Health Professions Scholarship, a $1,000 award for a Gifford employee or an employee’s child pursuing a health care education. Laura Perez, communications director of the Stagecoach Transportation Services, accepted the $1,000 Philip D. Levesque Memorial Community Award, given annually in recognition of his personal commitment to the White River Valley.

Randy Garner

Retiring board member Randy Garner was presented with a gift to honor his 12 years of service at Gifford Medical Center’s 109th Annual Meeting. Vice-President of the board Peter Nowlan looks on.

For the second year of a two-year commitment, the $25,000 William and Mary Markle Community Grant was given to schools in Gifford’s service area to promote exercise and healthy eating and lifestyles.

Board of trustees and directors election and service recognition
During the corporators business meeting, retiring member Randy Garner was presented with a gift to recognize his 12 years of service, and retiring board member Fred Newhall was recognized for his three years of service.

The following slate of new corporators were elected: Brad Atwood (Sharon); Rob and Linda Dimmick (Randolph Center); Dee Montie & Murray Evans (Brookfield); Joan Goldstein (South Royalton); Kelly Green (Randolph); Kate Kennedy (Braintree); Doreen Allen Lane (Berlin); Larry and Susan Trottier (South Royalton); Clay Westbrook (Randolph)

The following were elected officers of the board of directors: Gus Meyer, chair; Peter Nowlan, vice chair; Barbara Rochat, secretary; Lincoln Clark, treasurer.

Lighthouse Photographs on Display in Gifford’s Art Gallery

Randolph artist Christopher J. Fuhrmeister

Bass Harbor Head Light, Arcadia National Park, ME

Eighteen photographs by Randolph artist Christopher J. Fuhrmeister are currently on display at Gifford Medical Center’s art gallery in an exhibit that will run through April 1, 2015.

Fuhrmeister was given a Kodak Brownie camera when he was 12 and bought his first 35mm camera while in high school, working on features for his yearbook and as a newspaper sports photographer. He was a general photographer for his college paper, and later worked as a reporter/photographer for the St. Johnsbury Caledonian Record.

For many years he worked as an emergency management communications officer and then a telecommunications coordinator for the Vermont Public Safety Headquarters in Waterbury. When he retired in 2006, he switched from conventional film to digital photography.

While most of his photographs are of Vermont scenes, he was born in Maine and has a soft spot for lighthouses. This display is taken from his collection of photographs of lighthouses that he has visited in the eastern United States.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through April 1, 2015. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Gifford Receives 2015 Business Excellence in Sustainability Award from White River Valley Chamber of Commerce

Emma Schumann and Ashley Lincoln

Emma Schumann, executive director of the White River Valley Chamber of Commerce (left) with Ashley Lincoln, director of Gifford’s development and public relations.

On February 6, Gifford received the 2015 Business Excellence in Sustainability award from the White River Valley Chamber of Commerce.

This award recognizes remarkable efforts to sustain and support the communities of the White River Valley, and was given to Gifford for its holiday gift certificate program.

The program, which distributes gift certificates redeemable at local businesses, allows Gifford to thank employees for their dedication and hard work while contributing to the economic health of the community it serves. Historically, within three weeks in December, Gifford employees spend nearly $40,000 at locally owned community businesses from Chelsea to Rochester, Sharon to Barre, and towns in between.

“For 14 years I have had the privilege of organizing this program, and I can honestly say that it is one of the more rewarding parts of my job. Some Gifford staff members have cried when they received their gift certificates,” said Ashley Lincoln, director of Development and Public Relations at Gifford. “Over the years many business owners have also told me how much Gifford’s support has meant to them during the slow winter months.”

Community has always been important to Gifford. Along with the gift certificate program, the medical center offers scholarships and grants each year to support area businesses and schools; during the growing and harvest season meals include produce from local farmers; and careful consideration of the community needs is considered when planning projects like the new senior living community being developed in Randolph Center.

Lincoln adds, “Nourishing and building healthy, sustainable communities ensures that we will be able to continue to provide quality local care for years to come.”