Work by Randolph Center Artist Paul Calter at Gifford Gallery

“The View from Braintree Hill,” by artist Paul Calter

“The View from Braintree Hill,” by artist Paul Calter

“Close to Home,” an exhibit of sketchbook pages by Randolph Center artist Paul Calter, is on display through June 29, 2016, in the Gifford Medical Center Art Gallery.

The 39 landscapes were created in locations within ten miles of Randolph during a period spanning nearly 50 years. Each scene is numbered and keyed to a map of the area hung near the exhibit.

“There’s no need to travel to an exotic location to find something to please the eye,” Calter writes in his artist’s note. “Sometimes I would set up an easel, but more often I’d just find a rock to sit on, with my pad in my lap, or sketch standing with a small pad in one hand and a brush in the other.”

In 1968 Calter left an engineering job in New York City to teach mathematics in Vermont, where he also began to draw, paint, and sculpt. He earned a Masters of Fine Arts Degree in sculpture from the Vermont College of Norwich University (now the Vermont College of Fine Arts) in 1993.

Calter’s paintings and sculptures have been commissioned and exhibited around the region. He has permanent pieces featured at Vermont Technical College, Castleton State College, and Gifford. His pieces at the hospital include a fountain in the Courtyard Garden (donated in 2009) and a marble carving of a nurse located near the inpatient unit, (donated 2012).

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through June 29, 2016. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

The Best Beginnings: Personalized, 24-Hour Support for Moms and Newborns

This article was published in our 2015 Annual Report.

Gifford's Birthing Center

(L to R): Bonnie Hervieux-Woodbury, Ronda
Flagherty, Karin Olson, Kim Summers, Mary Borie, Bonnie
Solley, Jennifer Davis

For more than 35 years women have traveled from all over to have their babies at Gifford. Our nurses are famous for their loving care — many have helped welcome multiple siblings to a family.

“Our certified nurse midwives and Birthing Center nurses provide compassionate, personalized labor support for low-intervention births,” said Director of Women’s Health Bonnie Hervieux-Woodbury. “Women are attracted to Gifford because we offer a variety of choices, including epidurals and the back-up support of three ob/gyn physicians.”

Gifford Capital Campaign Approaches $5 Million Goal

Vision for the Future CampaignRANDOLPH – Vision for the Future, the largest capital campaign in Gifford’s 113-year history, is making a final push to wrap up its $5 million fundraising goal. With just
$397,000 to go, the campaign committee is asking everyone to consider contributing to help raise this final amount.

Silently launched in 2013, the campaign has raised more than $4.6 million to support a 3-phased project: building a new Menig Nursing Home to anchor a senior living community, the creation of private inpatient rooms at the main medical center, and a new, updated Birthing Center.

“Our campaign goal was ambitious, but our vision was as well—to improve our facilities so we can continue to provide the best possible healthcare for future generations in our community, from newborns through old age,” said Gifford’s Development Director Ashley Lincoln. “I’ve been so moved by the hard work of our volunteer campaign steering committee and the generous support we’ve received from our community.”

Lincoln notes that over the course of just one year campaign contributors have been able to see firsthand the impact their gifts have on the lives of their neighbors:

• Residents transitioned into the beautiful new 25-bed Menig Nursing Home in Randolph Center last year and they will celebrate a one-year move-in anniversary in May.

• The hospital opened 25 new private inpatient rooms in December, 2015.

• In June the new Birthing Center will open in a centralized location, with upgrades and four new private rooms overlooking a courtyard garden.

“It is exciting to see that our target is within reach,” Lincoln said. “Our donors’ enthusiasm, and their faith in our stewardship of their gifts, has supported us throughout the entire campaign. We are so close now—I hope people will be inspired to help us wrap up our funding in June.”

For more information about Gifford’s Vision for the Future campaign call Ashley Lincoln at 728-2380 or visit http://www.giffordmed.org/VisionfortheFuture.

Making a Difference: When Work Becomes Community

This article was published in our 2015 Annual Report.

Drs. Lou DiNicola and Christina DiNicola

Drs. Lou DiNicola and Christina DiNicola

In 1976 Pediatrician Lou DiNicola came to Randolph for an interview shortly after completing his residency. The first provider he met wore jeans and a flannel shirt, and he knew right then he was at an unusual organization.

“I spent the night at the CEO’s house—it really was a community hospital!” he said. “I wanted to work in Vermont, and I wanted to care for kids, not just see them and send them on to a larger medical center. I took the position.”

Forty years later, DiNicola is still practicing in Randolph (he also saw families in the Rochester clinic until 1992), and he has become a passionate and respected advocate for children’s health, helping to shape state legislation on a range of issues.

The organization has grown (there are now six community health centers), and you see fewer flannel shirts, but the feel of a “real community hospital” remains. The local Rotary Club holds morning meetings in the cafeteria, where at lunch the staff mingles with neighbors who come for great locally-sourced food; there are no reserved spaces for VIPs in the parking lot; and the computerized staff email directory is still arranged alphabetically by an employee’s first name.

In a small community everyone’s lives are intertwined. We care for people who repair our cars, teach our children, attend our church, or manage the store where we buy groceries. The lines that separate hospital from community, caregiver from patient, and even family from co-worker are less distinct.

“Everything that happens in the community —a town fire, school events, Hurricane Irene—comes into our office as well. I have patients now who are the grandchildren of patients I saw years ago,” said Dr. Lou DiNicola. “I live less than three miles from work; clearly this is my home.”

For Dr. Lou DiNicola the connection goes even deeper: Pediatrician Dr. Christina DiNicola spent a summer jobshadowing him before heading off to Stanford University in fall of 1994. Today her former mentor is both a colleague and her father-in-law.

“I wanted to live in the same community I worked in, to have the same accountability to community as to family,” said Christina, who came from a larger practice in Philadelphia last spring. “People care about each other, and about life outside work. There’s a special kind of familiarity this way. The people I see in the office I also see in my community—just in different roles.”

Both Dr. DiNicolas say this blurred line between their work and community roles brings relevance to their work, and shapes the way they deliver care. When something they do has a positive impact, they can see how lives are changed.

“In previous positions I was part of a team of rotating doctors,” said Christina. “My work in the clinic here is especially satisfying to me because I can follow up directly with patients and build ongoing relationships with families.”

Dr. Lou DiNicola says the opportunity for connection and community still attracts new providers. Another draw also endures, something he recognized when he visited years ago, and that is Gifford’s focus on quality. This ensures that the technology and expertise needed for direct patient care is available locally—most patients aren’t sent elsewhere after diagnosis. We do everything we can to treat our patients in the community setting.

“Today medical students are most often trained to be specialists at larger medical centers. Those who want to do more personalized care, and to see a wide range of cases, come to rural medicine,” he said. “I value my ongoing relationships with people in the community, but I also take satisfaction in being there for people who have come a long way for care. People from all over choose to have their babies at Gifford and helping them with the birthing process, whether routine or complicated, has also always been a rewarding experience. We have the best of both worlds at Gifford!”

Bethel Artist Carla Hodgdon Exhibit at Gifford Gallery

“Fuchsia,” pen and ink drawing by Bethel artist Carla Lamberton Powers Hodgdon.

RANDOLPH – Work by Bethel artist Carla Lamberton Powers Hodgdon is on display through May 25, 2016, in the Gifford Medical Center Art Gallery.

The 36 pieces in this exhibit display work in a variety of mediums, including watercolor, pen and ink, pencil, mixed media, and counted and stamped cross stitch. While she has never taken art classes or received formal training, over the years Hodgdon has turned to
art as a way to relax, especially during the winter months when she is not in the garden. Her mother first introduced her to needlework when she was a child, which led to her interest in cross stitch.

A native Vermonter, Hodgdon has lived and worked in Vermont for all but ten years of her life. She trained as a registered nurse and worked as a public health administrator, retiring from the VT State Department of Health in 2003. While away from Vermont, she served in the Peace Corps, working at the National University of Honduras as an associate professor of Nursing. After returning to the States in 1969, she worked at the Yolo County Health Department just outside Sacramento, CA. She returned to Vermont in 1977, and moved back to her hometown of Bethel in 1983.

Since her retirement she has enjoyed having time to volunteer in community and church activities, to care for extensive perennial flowerbeds, and especially to create art and needlework.

Since her retirement she has enjoyed having time to volunteer in community and church
activities, to care for extensive perennial flowerbeds, and especially to create art and
needlework.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through May 25, 2016.
The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12)
in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

 

Gifford Welcomes Certified Nurse-Midwife Julia Cook

Certified nurse-midwife Julia Cook

RANDOLPH – Certified nurse-midwife Julia Cook has joined Gifford’s team of midwives, and is now seeing patients in our Randolph and Berlin clinics.

Cook received a Master of Science in Nursing from Frontier Nursing University in Hyden, KY. Her clinical interests include adolescent care, patient education, and helping women to be active participants in their ob/gyn care.

Born in rural Louisiana, she moved to a suburb of Atlanta while in High School, and went on to get an associate of Science in Nursing from Georgia Perimeter College. She was first attracted to ob/gyn care after the birth of her first child 16 years ago.

“The midwives who cared for me were amazing—they empowered me as a woman and as a new mother,” she said. “I was intrigued by what they did, and asked them what I needed to do to start on that career path.”

When Cook finished her training she began to look for work in a smaller community, and was drawn by the story of Gifford’s Birthing Center and its pioneering efforts in family centered birth. She also appreciates that her work will include opportunities for well-women and adolescent care.

“I feel that education is so important when it comes to women’s health,” she said. “I especially enjoy working with adolescents because they are at a time in life when information about how to be healthy is taken with them as they transition into adulthood.”

Cook says her husband and four children are also excited about moving to New England, and the family looks forward to living in a smaller community and exploring all the new things Vermont offers.

To schedule an appointment, or to learn more about Gifford’s Birthing Center, please call 802-728-2401.

The Transformative Power of a Small Gesture

This article was published in our 2015 Annual Report.

Dr. Lou DiNicola, Development Director Ashley Lincoln and Lincoln Clark

Dr. Lou DiNicola, Development Director Ashley Lincoln and Lincoln Clark

Gifford’s Vision for the Future began in 2008, with 31 acres in Randolph Center and a list of long-term facility and community needs. After years of community input and careful strategic planning, this year we watched the “vision” become real: the New Menig Nursing Home opened in May and 25 new private inpatient rooms opened in December. A new and modernized Birthing Center will open this coming spring.

For us, one of the most gratifying aspects of this past year has been seeing people experience firsthand the impact that their gift has on our community. Our Menig residents are enjoying a new home, filled with light and beautiful views of the surrounding mountains and meadows, and anyone visiting the hospital can see how new private rooms have improved the healing environment for patients.

The highlight of our year came in November, when the Gifford Auxiliary made a million dollar contribution to the campaign—the largest gift in Gifford’s history! This gift is especially impressive as the funds were raised primarily through small-dollar sales of “re-purposed” items at the Thrift Shop.

Who could imagine that the ripple created by a donated box of unused household clutter could extend so far?

It is humbling what dedication, persistence, and belief in a unified vision can do. The investment of the Auxiliary and so many other generous donors represents a powerful affirmation of what we do every day at Gifford. Each gift has contributed to an outpouring of support that will help us continue to provide quality local care for generations to come.

Your generosity, and your faith in Gifford’s mission, makes transformation possible. We can never say it enough: thank you!

Gifford Auxiliary

Ashley Lincoln
Development & Public Relations Director

Lincoln Clark & Dr. Lou DiNicola
Vision for the Future co-chairs

Winter Landscapes by Kate Reeves at Gifford Gallery

Photo provided courtesy of Kate Reeves: “My Winter World.”

“My Winter World,” an exhibit of 14 watercolor paintings by Vermont artist Kate Reeves, is currently on display in the Gifford Medical Center Art Gallery.

An avid outdoors enthusiast, Reeves spent many years as a professional Nordic ski instructor and says winter is perhaps her favorite season in Vermont. She now shares her love of winter landscapes through her art, creating techniques to mimic falling or blowing snow.

Reeves will use gouache and oil crayon to depict snow-laden branches, or the frost on tree trunks and rocks. In the painting “Skaters Lingering on the Pond” she uses a razor blade to show the marks of skates scraping the ice. A spatter of gouache, blown thru a small screen, creates an image of falling snow—a technique she calls her ‘snow treatment’.

“I like the movement this spatter of snow creates. It gives the work more life,” she says. “Snow brings out the detail and textures of the barren woods and the bright colors of jackets on children ice skating on a pond.”

Reeves began studying watercolors 12 years ago with Annette Compton in Woodstock, VT. She is a signature member of the Vermont Watercolor Society, and has displayed her work in hospitals, libraries, and inns around the Upper Valley. She is one of a small group of artists who own STUDIO 33, a shared workspace and gallery in Woodstock, and also paints in her home in Barnard, Vt.

This exhibit is free and open to the public, and will be displayed through April 20, 2016. The gallery is located just inside the hospital’s main entrance at 44 S, Main St. (Route 12) in Randolph. Call Gifford at (802) 728-7000 for more information.

Rochester Welcomes Dr. Erwin Lange to Community’s Health Center

Gifford Medical Center

Photo: Dr. Erwin Lange (right) with Rochester Health Center Office Manager Dawn Beriau (left) and Registered Nurse Gail Proctor.

Dr. Erwin Lange has joined Gifford’s Primary Care team and is seeing patients at the Rochester Health Center. He started in Rochester as a locum in November, 2015 and has now settled in full-time as the community’s primary care provider. Lange brings many years of medical experience to his patients. He received a BA from Dartmouth College, a MD from the Brown Alpert Medical School in Providence RI, and completed a three year residency in family practice at the St. Joseph Hospital Health Center in Syracuse, NY.

Board certified in Family Practice, he began his career as a family practitioner in a rural community in New York State before moving into practice as an emergency physician in several NH and Vermont hospitals. When he decided to return to family medicine he was looking for a rural community like Rochester, where he could care for a variety of conditions but also establish ongoing relationships with patients.

Office Manager Dawn Beriau and Registered Nurse Gail Proctor have worked at the clinic for more than 30 years and are introducing him to local families, many who have been receiving primary care at the Health Center for generations. Lange says he really has appreciated how welcoming the Rochester community has been during his first months here. “Rochester really is an amazing community,” he said. “Sometimes people have stopped in just to introduce themselves and visit, and that has been great!”

The Rochester Health Center opened in 1976 and provides family and internal (adult) medicine in a convenient location at 235 Main Street. Dr. Lange sees patients at the center from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and Physician Assistant Tammy Gerdes sees patients on Fridays. Services include: annual physicals, blood work, sick visits, EKGs, chronic disease management, care coordination, and emergency procedures. To schedule an appointment call 802-767-3704.

Gifford Primary Care Team Welcomes Dr. Kasra Djalayer

Gifford Medica Center

Dr. Kasra Djalayer

Dr. Kasra Djalayer has joined Gifford Health Care’s primary care team and is now seeing patients in the Berlin and Randolph clinics. He also sees Gifford patients at the Rowan Court Nursing Home in Barre, where he is the Medical Director.

Board-certified in internal medicine, Dr. Djalayer received his license of Medicine and Surgery at the University of Complutenese (Madrid, Spain). He completed his residency at the Yale-Griffin Hospital Prevention Research Center and did post graduate training in Obesity at Harvard University and in Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology at the University of Vermont. His clinical interests include dementia-related behavioral disorders, geriatric medicine, and rheumatology.

Most recently he has worked at Franklin Regional Hospital (Franklin, NH) and as a hospitalist at the New London Hospital (New London, NH), and the Brattleboro Memorial Hospital (Brattleboro, VT).  “Dr. DJ,” as he is known to his patients, has received both the Patients Choice Award and the Compassionate Doctor recognition for five consecutive years (2000-2014).

“I like to use humor in my conversations, and find it energizing to build ongoing relationships with patients,” he said. “We talk about the details of their medical problem but also about their situation in general—any family issues or other concerns. It’s an important part of good care.”

When not working, Dr. Djalayer enjoys cycling, tennis, swimming, and reading to keep up with current events and new medical developments.