Dr. Lou DiNicola Honored By the Vermont Medical Society

Dr. Lou DiNicola

Dr. Lou DiNicola with award and scroll

Randolph pediatrician and former president of the American Academy of Pediatrics Vermont Chapter, Louis DiNicola, M.D., received the Green Mountain Pediatrician Award on Friday, November 14 at the chapter’s annual meeting in Montpelier.

Surrounded by approximately 50 of his Vermont colleagues, Dr. DiNicola was acknowledged for over 38 years of service as a Gifford pediatrician. The award is given annually to an outstanding pediatrician for their dedication and contribution to children’s health in the state.

“I was very surprised,” Dr. DiNicola said. “It humbles me when I am recognized. I do what I love; this is what makes me tick.”

The award was presented by long-time friend and colleague, Dr. Kim Aakre of Springfield. In addition to a plaque, she presented a 7-foot handwritten scroll, describing what makes Dr. DiNicola special. The scroll added even more emotion to the event.

DiNicola shared, “I lost a longtime neighbor and friend earlier in the day. This handmade gift has helped fill that hole in my heart; the timing was perfect.”

Employee Anniversaries

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

employee awards banquetAt this year’s annual Employee Awards Banquet, the following employees were honored for their years of dedication and service to Gifford and its patients.

(Employees are honored on their 5-, 10-, 15-, etc., year anniversaries.)

5 years
Jenell Archer
Angela Bailey
Christie Blodgett
Elizabeth Britch
Sheri Brown
Kristine Day
Peggy Eaccarino
Kate Fellows
Angela Fletcher
Ginny Giles
Jan Giles
Cindy Gurdak
Vera Jones
Brittany Kelton
Sarah Larmie
Laura Larrabee
Peter Loescher
Heidi McClellan
Melinda Mercier
Jamie Miller
Kim Nelson
Shane Parks
Kathleen Riley
Fern Rogers
Brian Sargent
Megan Sault
Joel Schumacher
Jackie Sprague
Melissa Thayer
Scott Warren
Lisa Woods

10 years
Julie Arms
Gail Bourassa
Patrice Conard
Cindy Duval
James Kirkpatrick
Judy Libby
Terry MacDougal
Joe Pelletier
Dan Pritchard
Rob Rinaldi
Sandi Standish

15 years
Kim Connolly
Donna Ferris
Tara Fitzpatrick
Ronda Flaherty
Tina Grant
Beryl McPhetres
Michele Packard
Kim Summers

20 years
Tom Carter
Darlene Doyle
Marc Fournier
Rosalie Knowles
Kevin McNamara
Deanna Mitchell
Sue Molinario
Melanie Munyon
Bonnie Pettit
Karen Sargent
Starr Strong

25 years
Bonnie Hervieux-Woodbury
Kathy MacAskill
Pam Overstrom
Gail Proctor
Laudell Slack

35 years
Marcia Eaton
Karen Lagro

40 years
Maureen Heyder

Gifford Named a Top 100 Critical Access Hospital in the Nation

Gifford facadeGifford Medical Center in Randolph has been named among the nation’s top 100 performing Critical Access Hospitals by iVantage Health Analytics.

iVantage has developed what it calls a Hospital Strength INDEX and for 2014 measured 1,246 Critical Access Hospitals across the nation on 66 different performance metrics, including quality, patient outcomes and satisfaction, affordability, population health and hospital financial strength.

After weighing all of those factors, Gifford for 2014 has been named among the Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals in the nation – meaning it does well in a variety of areas as compared to its peers.

“Rural health care …. plays a vital role for communities across America, serving nearly 80 million people. The services provided in rural America are similar to those needed in any major metropolitan area, yet the volumes and economic resources provide little economies of scale, making for little benefit from scale. These Top 100 Critical Access Hospitals exhibit a focused concern for their community benefits and needs, regardless of scale, reimbursement and people’s ability to pay,” said John Morrow, executive vice president of iVantage.

Gifford was founded in 1903 and is part of Vermont’s non-profit health system. A 25-bed hospital in Randolph, it has eight outlying health centers meeting community members’ health needs where they live and work.

For the last 14 consecutive years, Gifford has met its state-approved budget and operating margin – a unique feat amid challenging economic times. At the same time, Gifford has embraced community health improvement initiatives that benefit patients, such the Vermont Blueprint for Health and by achieving Federally Qualified Health Center status.

A Critical Access Hospital is a hospital certified to receive cost-based reimbursement from Medicare. This program is intended to reduce hospital closures in rural areas, promotes a process for improving rural health care and focuses on community needs. Federally Qualified Health Centers are also nationally designated, but rather than inpatient care support outpatient primary care, including mental and dental health.

“What is interesting about this evaluation is that it looks at so many different indicators, all publicly available data, and combines them into a comprehensive evaluation. This year factors also grew to include the health of our community – a vital area where Gifford as a Critical Access Hospital and a Federally Qualified Health Center excels,” said Ashley Lincoln, Gifford director of development and public relations.

“These findings tell our community that we not only have a strong, high-quality local health care provider but that Gifford is well positioned for health care reform,” Lincoln added.

Springfield and Copley hospitals in Vermont also made the list.

A Message from the Board Chair

The following is an excerpt from our 2013 Annual Report: A Recipe for Success.

Gus Meyer

Gus Meyer

The theme of this year’s Annual Report is a Recipe for Success. Without question, Gifford had that recipe in 2013! We continued to gain great recognition for what we’ve done, while taking major strides to position ourselves to do even more in the future.

In 2013, as we awaited permits for the senior retirement community, we undertook important expansions to the Kingwood and Sharon health centers. Ultimately, the senior retirement Act 250 permits and Certificate of Need were granted, making us ready to break ground for the new nursing home in the spring of 2014, with independent and assisted living options to follow. Moving the nursing home will enable us to renovate our inpatient unit, with single-patient rooms that will significantly improve health safety and comfort for patients using that facility.

In addition, we earned designation as a Federally Qualified Health Center. This will enable us to expand our core commitment to primary care, including new initiatives and collaborations to extend dental and mental health services to underserved areas.

gallon of leadershipAs we have pursued these plans for the future, Gifford has continued its commitment to patient care and furthering the health of our communities. We are extremely proud that Dr. Lou DiNicola was given the Physician Award for Community Service by the Vermont Medical Society. We are delighted that Major McLaughlin was named the national Outstanding Senior Volunteer. We are humbled by the continued recognition of the Menig Extended Care Facility.

As we reflect on these accomplishments and look forward with tremendous anticipation to 2014, it is an honor for the Board to serve an organization that continually goes above and beyond. Even as we experience constant change in today’s health care environment, we have great confidence that Gifford’s ever-evolving recipe will generate success this year and for many more to come.

Gus Meyer
Board Chair

State’s Most Energy-Efficient Hospital Striving for ‘Energy Star’ Rating

Gifford ranks first in Vermont for energy efficiency among hospitals

Gifford aiming for Energy Star label

Gifford electricians Stu Standish and Frank Landry, part of the Randolph hospital’s facilities team, replace 250-watt metal halide parking lot lights with 78-watt LEDs. Gifford is the most energy efficient hospital in Vermont and is striving to do even better by becoming the first Vermont hospital to earn the “Energy Star” label. (Provided: Robin Palmer)

Already the most energy efficient hospital in the state, Gifford Medical Center is striving to become the first hospital in Vermont to earn a national “Energy Star” rating by the end of 2014.

The Energy Star label is a program by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency that benchmarks energy use. For hospitals that means looking at energy use per square foot and then taking into account factors such as number of hospital beds, number of employees and climates. Hospitals are then ranked nationwide.

No Vermont hospital has achieved the 75th percentile ranking required for the Energy Star rating. Gifford is currently at 65 percent and as such, the most energy efficient hospital in Vermont.

The Randolph medical center would have to reduce its energy usage by 6 percent to reach the 75th percentile. Despite Gifford’s record of energy efficiency, Tim Perrin at Efficiency Vermont and Gifford’s Director of Facilities Tyson Moulton say further reduction is attainable.

In fact, energy efficiency projects are already under way.

Last month, electricians at Gifford changed out parking lot lights from 250-watt metal halide bulbs to more efficient 78-watt LEDs.

Other projects planned include replacing a large kitchen stove hood with one that runs on demand using heat sensors rather than running more constantly. In addition to electricity savings, the hood would remove less air that has already been heated or cooled. Heating and ventilation systems in parts of the building are also being rebalanced to run more efficiently.

The projects, noted Moulton, are part of an ongoing energy efficiency plan at the hospital and relatively small in scale because of work that has already taken place.

“We have a history of energy efficiency,” Moulton said.

Moulton gives a couple of examples. A project in the 1980s focused on recapturing some exhaust heat from the medical center’s inpatient unit to reclaim energy. The building’s pumping system has been simplified to replace many smaller pumps added over time with fewer larger pumps, and domestic hot water and chilled water for coolant systems have also been converted to demand-based systems.

Tyson Moulton and Theron Manning

Gifford Director of Facilities Tyson Moulton, right, poses with his predecessor, Theron Manning, on the rooftop of the Randolph medical center. In the background are heating, ventilation and air conditioning units. Over decades of work, Manning set the stage for Gifford to become the state’s most energy efficient hospital. Working with Efficiency Vermont, Moulton is carrying on the tradition as Gifford now strives to earn an “Energy Star” rating. (Provided: Robin Palmer)

Moulton credits former facilities head Theron Manning with the decades-long work that has led to Gifford’s top energy efficiency rating.

The ranking, however, does not include buildings outside of the main medical center, namely older homes that have been converted into office space surrounding the medical center and Gifford’s eight outlying community health centers.

The benchmarking of Vermont hospitals is by Efficiency Vermont, which has been reaching out to medical centers to reduce energy usage. Efficiency Vermont helped Gifford audit and identify lower cost ways to reduce energy consumption last year when the medical center and other large Vermont employers participated in a voluntary “Energy Leadership Challenge.”

Gifford is also part of the national Healthier Hospitals Initiative. Vermont is the first state in the nation to have all hospitals join the initiative, which includes energy reduction.

Efficiency Vermont, Vermont hospitals and the Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems worked collaboratively on the Healthier Hospitals Initiative.

“We have been very impressed with the work that Gifford has done to manage energy usage and promote sustainability,” Richard Donnelly of Efficiency Vermont said in announcing that all Vermont hospitals had signed on to the initiative.

“Energy efficiency is always part of projects,” Moulton said. “When we replace fixtures and equipment, we look at what we can do to be energy efficient.”

That look toward energy efficiency is done both from a costs’ perspective to save the non-profit, patient-focused medical center money and to reduce its impact on the environment, particularly when it comes to non-renewable energy.

“Both electricity and oil are very expensive,” said Moulton. “Most of Vermont’s electricity, however, is from a hydroelectric, which is renewable. Oil is a limited resource.”

Randolph Man Named Nation’s ‘Outstanding Senior Volunteer’

95-year-old Major Melvin McLaughlin warmly celebrated

Major recognition

From left, Patrice Thabault of Home Instead Senior Care presents 2013 Outstanding Senior Volunteer Major Melvin McLaughlin and Gifford Administrator Joseph Woodin with a $5,500 in recognition of McLaughlin to support a charity of his choice, Gifford.

Randolph’s Maj. Melvin McLaughlin has spent more than 40 years selflessly volunteering at his local medical center, Gifford. On Wednesday that volunteerism was recognized – big time.

The 95-year-old retired U.S. Marine, fondly known as “Major,” was named the country’s 2013 Outstanding Senior Volunteer by Home Instead Senior Care.

Home Instead is the world’s largest provider of non-medical, in-home care services for seniors. Last year it launched the Salute to Senior Service Contest to recognize senior volunteerism.

Nominated by the staff at Gifford for his daily visits to the hospital, McLaughlin was named the Vermont winner of the contest last month and on Wednesday at noon at Gifford in Randolph was recognized as the national winner.

“Home Instead wants to encourage a positive outlook on aging,” Vermont franchise owner Patrice Thabault noted in presenting the award. “The Major and other (senior) volunteers are really changing the face of aging in the United States.”

With the recognition came a $5,500 check ($500 as the state winner and $5,000 as the national winner) from Home Instead to Gifford, the charity that McLaughlin chose to recognize with his award.

Major recognition

Representatives of VA Medical Center, from left, Chief of Voluntary Services Karen Campbell and Patient Services Manager Wendy DeCoff, present 2013 national Outstanding Senior Volunteer Major Melvin McLaughlin of Randolph with a Courage of Valor award. The award is for World War II veterans who are VA patients.

The gifts didn’t stop at the national recognition, however.

Hearing about McLaughlin’s honor, VA Medical Center Chief of Voluntary Service Karen Campbell attended Wednesday’s presentation to honor McLaughlin, a long-time VA patient, with its Courage of Valor award.

“They don’t necessarily have the time, but they always have the heart,” Campbell said of volunteers, “and, boy, do you have that.”

Fran Keeler of Vermont Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living (DAIL) read a letter of commendation from DAIL Commissioner Susan Wehry. “Your more than 40 years of dedicated service … is appreciated. You’re an inspiration to us,” Wehry wrote.

Sen. Bernie Sanders sent his own letter of congratulations, thanking McLaughlin “for demonstrating such generosity and goodwill over the past four decades.”

Sen. Patrick Leahy sent McLaughlin a flag that had flown over U.S. Capitol.

And Gifford Administrator Joseph Woodin unveiled a granite plaque anonymously donated and featuring the words McLaughlin says to each patient, nursing home resident, and staff member he visits at Gifford: “Has anyone today told you that they love you?” McLaughlin then answers, “God does and I do too.”

The plaque of Barre granite now sits in the hospital’s visitors’ entrance as a permanent fixture for all to see.

Major recognition

Major Melvin McLaughlin, the nation’s 2013 Outstanding Senior Volunteer, is surrounded by his three daughters, from left, Sally Truckenbrod of Bethel, Nancy Stevens of Raleigh, N.C., and Audrey Rhoades of Washington, N.H. The daughters surprised him by all attending a July 3 celebration of McLaughlin’s national recognition. It is the first time the family was all together since McLaughlin’s wife’s passing almost four years early to the day. She died on July 4 and was a resident of the Menig Extended Care Facility at Gifford, where McLaughlin still volunteers.

McLaughlin first moved to Randolph in 1967 after retiring from 25 years with the U.S. Marines, serving in World War II, Korea, and the infancy of Vietnam. He built a home and a second for one of his daughters, Sally, and then found himself with free time. He started volunteering at Gifford on Thursdays, delivering the local newspaper to patients.

Later, he took patient meal orders on a clipboard and then several years ago began making general rounds seven days a week, visiting with patients and staff alike, offering his telltale phrase of love, plenty of hugs, a positive attitude, and plenty of gratitude.

Woodin called that gift of love an intangible, but a powerful gift that anyone can afford. The fact that that gift and lesson on experiencing love comes from a tough Marine makes it all the more powerful.

Woodin sought to return the favor by asking the large crowd in attendance at Wednesday award announcement to honor McLaughlin with a warmly and loudly delivered, “We love you, Major.”

“My cup runneth over,” Major said in response, encouraging all in attendance to live each day with only gladness, no shame. “Thank you, Lord, for your blessings. I am a rich man.”

Read much more about McLaughlin on the Salute to Senior Service Web site, www.salutetoseniorservice.com, and look for him in Thursday’s Randolph Fourth of July Parade. He is the grand marshal.

Year in Review – Part 1

Our 2012 Annual Report included a month-by-month “Year in Review” section. Here is the first quarter excerpt.

JANUARY

pediatrics' open houseUrologist Dr. Richard Graham and menopause practitioner Dr. Ellamarie Russo-DeMara of the Twin River Health Center offer a free talk at the Montshire Museum on urinary incontinence.

Gifford is once again awarded a grant from the Avon Breast Health Outreach Program. For the 11th year, Gifford is the only entity in Vermont to receive the $35,000 grant for breast cancer awareness education and outreach.

Pediatrics and adolescent medicine moves from the main medical center building to Dr. Chris Soares’ former space at the corner of South Main and Maple streets. Joining the practice on the first floor of the renovated, spacious Victorian home is pediatric physical, occupational, and speech therapies.

A free three-week series on heart health includes talks from cardiologist Dr. Bruce Andrus and registered dietitian Stacy Pelletier as well as a heart-healthy cooking demonstration from Gifford’s chefs.

FEBRUARY

As part of Gifford’s expanded efforts under the Vermont Blueprint for Health, a chronic illness support group – Chronic HealthShare Consortium – is launched and begins meeting monthly.

Dr. Ovleto Ciccarelli strives to bring colon health to the forefront with a free health talk, “Everyone’s Got One: A Discussion on the Colon and How to Keep It Healthy”.

Pacemaker surgeries return to Gifford after a quarter century hiatus.

The Menig Extended Care Facility is named among nation’s top 39 nursing homes by U.S. News and World Report, which released a list of “2012 Honor Roll” nursing homes. Menig was the only nursing home chosen in Vermont and neighboring New Hampshire.

MARCH

The 106th Annual Corporators Meeting is held at the medical center and features Steve Kimbell, commissioner of what was then the Vermont Department of Banking, Insurance, Securities and Health Care Administration. Leo Connolly, Fred Newhall, and Peter Nowlan are elected to the Board of Trustees.

A Vermont House of Representatives resolution recognizes “the outstanding health care services provided by Gifford Medical Center”. The resolution is in honor of Gifford’s more than 100 years of service to the Randolph area and for its many recent awards.

The Diabetes Education Expo focuses on teeth and feet and how diabetes can keep both healthy. It is the 7th annual exposition organized by the Diabetes Clinic especially for the growing diabetes population.

An open house is held for pediatrics’ new space at 40 South Main Street. Children attending enjoy face painting, balloons, snacks, tours of their new doctor’s office, bike helmet fittings, and painting tiles that have become part of the clinic’s permanent decor.

Vote for Major

Vote for Major for a Salute to Service AwardGifford Medical Center volunteer Maj. Melvin McLaughlin of Randolph has been nominated in the Salute to Senior Service Contest for his 40-plus years of volunteerism at the Randolph hospital.

Major, as he is known, is one of seven Vermonters nominated and hospital staff members are hoping that those who know and love Major will visit www.salutetoseniorservice.com between April 15-30 to vote for Major as the state’s winner and for a chance at a national recognition as “the most outstanding senior volunteer in the U.S.”

Your vote determines the state winner. A panel of judges picks the national winner.

A complete write-up on Major is available on the site. Here’s a bit of what the medical center had to say about their friend:
Major McLaughlin

Every single day, now 95-year-old Maj. Melvin McLaughlin makes the short drive from his Randolph home to his local hospital, Gifford Medical Center, to lend more than a helping hand; he lends a helping heart. Pushing a walker, Major visits every hospital unit and Gifford’s adjoining nursing home to offer patients and staff alike love, a listening ear, and the sincerest of thanks. Whether at a patient or staff member’s side, male or female, stranger or friend, Major – as most know him – breaks the ice with a catch phrase: “Has anyone told you today that they love you?” If the answer is no, Major is ready with his reply: “Well, God loves you and so do I.” Staff members are also treated to the most heartfelt thanks for the job they do and somewhere in this sharing of love, there is almost always a hug between the kind-hearted Major and those lucky enough to step in his path.

 

“Gifford is home,” he’s told us on more than one occasion. “I have so many friends here, from the top to the bottom. And I emphasize the bottom because I like to tell those people, ‘Thank you for what you do, because without your labors this place would not stand.”

Vote for MajorWe at Gifford love Major. He is a brilliant and beautiful light in the day. As one nurse put it, “A day without Major is a day without sunshine.” He is the personification of what we are as an organization – warm, compassionate, supportive, humbled and blessed to be able to care for others. Introduce a new staff member, patient, or nursing home resident to Major and we have just told them everything they need to know about us. We care. We’re family. We’re here for you. This is the type of individual who walks our halls. This is our benchmark for love. For his boundless selflessness, remarkable strength of character, and length of commitment, we can’t imagine an individual more deserving of this service award than our amazing, treasured friend Major.”

When the nomination was read at a volunteer appreciation luncheon at the medical center on April 10, Major received a standing ovation from all in attendance. The former Marine saluted his fellow volunteers.

Those visiting the Salute To Senior Service site can also add their own comments about Major.

Gifford Volunteers Honored

Selfless community members give 16,524 hours to non-profit hospital

Susan O'Malley of Randolph

Susan O’Malley of Randolph

Gifford Medical Center recognized its 120 volunteers at an annual appreciation luncheon on Wednesday.

Volunteers gave 16,524 hours in 2012. That’s 2,066 eight-hour workdays or the equivalent of eight full-time employees, noted Ashley Lincoln, director of development and marketing. “That’s a pretty incredible number,” Lincoln said. “We really appreciate the smiles that you bring, your enthusiasm, and your willingness to come when you’re called.”

Arlene Conant of Randolph Center and Robin Rafuse Gurney of Randolph

Arlene Conant of Randolph Center and Robin Rafuse Gurney of Randolph

Volunteers give of their time throughout the medical center, at its clinics, at the Adult Day, through chaplaincy, as part of the Board of Trustees and through the Gifford Auxiliary at the Thrift Shop. “We have a far reaching volunteer group and I thank all of you,” said Volunteer Services Coordinator Julie Fischer to the group of about 75 in attendance.

The volunteers were treated to live music by Thom Goodwin, quality and infection prevention manager at Gifford and a

Chris Furmeister of Randolph

Chris Furmeister of Randolph

musician. Gifford’s chefs prepared a meal based on the event’s Texas barbecue theme. Gifford staff volunteering as servers donned Western attire. And door prizes from generous local businesses, including Onion Flats, Randolph Village Pizza, Blue Moon Boutique, Belmains, Bud and Bella’s Bookshop, Dandelion Acres, Central Supplies, Chef’s Market, Holiday Beauty Salon and Tozier’s, were given out.

Major salutes

Major salutes

One volunteer in particular received a standing ovation after it was announced that the hospital has nominated him for a senior service award. Major Melvin McLaughlin, 95, has been volunteering at Gifford for more than 40 years.

Lincoln read the hospital’s nomination, which describes McLaughlin’s service and hospital staff members’ regard for the long-time volunteer. “We at Gifford love Major. He is a brilliant and beautiful light in the day. As one nurse put it, ‘A day without Major is a day without sunshine.’ He is the personification of what we are as an organization – warm, compassionate, supportive, humbled and blessed to be able to care for others. Introduce a new staff member, patient or nursing home resident to Major and we have just told them everything they need to know about us. We care. We’re family. We’re here for you.”

Nap and Agnes Pietryka of Randolph

Nap and Agnes Pietryka of Randolph

The text of the full nomination is available online at www.salutetoseniorservice.com. Hospital administrators are hoping staff, volunteers and community members visit the site between April 15-30 to vote for McLaughlin, a Randolph resident since 1967.

McLaughlin, a member of the U.S. Marines for 25 years, saluted his fellow volunteers as they cheered him.

Volunteers also offered their thanks for the opportunity to give of their time at the medical center, an experience so many find extremely rewarding.

The event concluded with a presentation from LaRae Francis of Gifford’s Blueprint Community Health Team, who explained the team’s work to connect Gifford patients with needed community services and to help them better navigate the health system. The program is aimed at helping the chronically ill better manage their diseases by reducing barriers to care. The team has had 600 referrals since it began in February of 2011.

Community members wanting to access the program to receive help and learn about available community services can call (802) 728-2499. For information on volunteering at Gifford, call Fischer at (802) 728-2324.

Gifford Shares Achievements, Plans

Gifford logo

Annual Corporators Meeting postponed

RANDOLPH – Each March Gifford Medical Center’s corporators gather to review the year past. This year, the 107th Annual Meeting of the Gifford Corporators has been postponed, but the hospital did not want to delay in sharing a few of 2012’s many successes and some plans for the future.

The meeting will be rescheduled, allowing for corporators to hold their annual business meeting, elect new board members and discuss health care reform.

Year in review

The end of the 2012 fiscal year marked another year “in the black” for Gifford. This is the 13thconsecutive year the medical center has achieved both its budget and operating margin – a feat unheard of at other Vermont hospitals.

The year also brought numerous awards and recognitions for the medical center. The Vermont House of Representatives honored Gifford with a legislative resolution of support and thanks. The Robin’s Nest Child Enrichment Center, Gifford’s day care, once again earned five STARS from the Vermont STep Ahead Recognition System.

The Menig Extended Care Facility nursing home was named a 2012 Best Nursing Home and an Honor Roll nursing home by U.S. News and World Report – the latter naming it one of the best 39 nursing homes in the country. (Menig just last month earned a 2013 Best Nursing Home recognition once again). Menig also received the state’s Nursing Home Quality Recognition.

The March of Dimes recognized Gifford with a Leadership Legacy award for its commitment to prenatal, birth and newborn care. Long-time pediatrician Dr. Lou DiNicola was recognized by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as the first-ever “CDC Childhood Immunization Champion” for the state of Vermont. Gifford was awarded a Hospital of Choice Award from The American Alliance of Healthcare Providers for courtesy and compassion.

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