South Royalton Band Headlining First Free Concert in Gifford Park

South Royalton Town BandRANDOLPH – The South Royalton Band, often called the South Royalton Town Band, will headline a free community concert at Gifford Medical Center on Wednesday, July 11. The concert is the first public event in Gifford’s new park space since it was completed earlier this year.

Conducted by Dick Ellis, the South Royalton Band plays a mixture of marches, songs from Broadway, novelties, Dixieland music, patriotic numbers and features some soloists.

Marches include the work of American conductor John Philip Sousa, the “March king.” Melodies from such musicals as “The Music Man” and “The Sound of Music” will be heard.

“We try to have enough variety that everyone hears something that they enjoy,” said Ellis, who is in his 68th year of conducting the band and is known as this area’s “music man.”

Comprised of about 30 musicians from around central Vermont, the South Royalton Band is among the few surviving town bands in the region. Ellis credits word of mouth with attracting talent to the band and hard work with keeping it alive.

Ellis has dedicated his life to creating music in central Vermont as the band’s conductor; as the founder of high school bands in Randolph, Bethel, Rochester and his native South Royalton; and through the family business, Ellis Music Co., which supplies about 4,000 instruments to students in 350 Vermont and New Hampshire schools.

“My ambition was to give every youngster in Vermont the opportunity to play an instrument,” Ellis said.

Seven of Ellis’ former high school students still play in the band along with his own son and daughter. The band plays Thursdays on the South Royalton green and around central Vermont.

“I like to promote the arts as much as I can and Randolph for many years has been a place without a park,” he said.

When Gifford Administrator Joseph Woodin started talking about including a park at the hospital, Ellis was immediately interested. It was an opportunity, he said, to support two of his favorite things – the hospital and the arts.

“I was very glad to see something like that happening,” said Ellis, who helped fund the park construction, which was built entirely with donations.

Now Ellis’ band kicks off what the hospital hopes are other community events in the park with a free concert.

“We hope many community members come out to enjoy this new space and the familiar favorite that is the South Royalton Town Band,” said Ashley Lincoln, director of development and public relations at Gifford.

The concert starts at 7 p.m. and is expected to last until 8:30 p.m. Spectators are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or a blanket, and even a picnic supper. The rain date is Wednesday, July 18. If the weather is questionable, visit www.giffordmed.org on the afternoon of July 11 for an update.

The Gifford park is located between the hospital and the Thrift Shop on South Main Street (Route 12) south of Randolph village. Ample parking is available onsite.

Physician Assistant Kate Clemente Joins Gifford Practices in Randolph, Rochester

physician assistant Kate Clemente

Physician assistant Kate Clemente joins Gifford practices in Randolph, Rochester

RANDOLPH – Kate Clemente didn’t have to look far to find her role model.

The Montpelier native’s mother has been a physician assistant for 35 years, dedicating herself to her profession and her community.

Now Clemente is doing the same. A certified physician assistant, Clemente has joined Gifford Medical Center’s family practice in Randolph and will be seeing patients at the Rochester Health Center in the coming months as well.

A graduate of Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, N.Y., Clemente went on to get her master’s degree in physician assistant studies at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, N.H.

“I’m so grateful to have been given the opportunity to practice close to home at such a wonderful and supportive hospital,” says Clemente of joining Gifford, which she describes as one of the state’s beloved community hospitals.

The chance to practice in family medicine was also appealing.

“You become part of people’s daily lives. You become integrated with the community. It’s special. It’s from a different era of medicine,” says Clemente, who has a special interest in women’s health, encouraging healthy lifestyles, nutrition, wellness and obesity prevention.
Clemente has previously volunteered for the Central Vermont Battered Women’s Shelter, The People’s Health and Wellness Clinic and Two Rivers Farm.

A warm and empathetic caregiver, Clemente is certified by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants.

She now lives in Middlesex in a straw bale home. She enjoys athletics and the outdoors in her spare time, including mountain biking in the summer as well as skiing and ice climbing in the winter.

Contact Clemente in Randolph at Gifford family practice at (802) 728-2445.

Nurse practitioner Emily LeVan Joins Bethel Health Center

Emily LeVan

Nurse practitioner Emily LeVan joins Bethel Health Center

RANDOLPH – Family nurse practitioner Emily LeVan of Randolph Center has joined the Bethel Health Center. The Bethel clinic is part of Gifford Medical Center.

LeVan earned her family nurse practitioner master’s degree from University of Cincinnati and her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Southern Maine in Portland. She is certified by the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners.

She previously worked as an emergency department registered nurse at Central Vermont Medical Center, Gifford Medical Center, and Miles Memorial Hospital in Damariscotta, Maine, for seven years. She has also worked as a health care consultant with The Chewonki Foundation in Wiscasset, Maine, and teaches licensed nursing assistant and medical terminology courses at the Randolph Technical Career Center.

She previously taught Spanish and was a field hockey and track coach in Maine and Massachusetts for six years after earning her a bachelor’s in environmental studies and Spanish from Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, and studying Spanish at Middlebury College.

An Oklahoma City native, LeVan moved to New England for school.

She enjoyed teaching and coaching, but was drawn to health care. “I wanted to do something different. I had always been interested in health care,” says LeVan, whose father is a dentist.

As she sought to advance her nursing degree, she chose family practice.

“I wanted to work directly with patients and help them achieve their maximum state of health and wellness,” she says.

She joined Gifford for the opportunity to work in her community and for the culture at Gifford. “I love that when you walk down the hall, people say ‘hi,’” she says, adding, “I feel that it’s an organization that supports the so-called ‘midlevel’ providers very nicely.”
LeVan sees whole families across the lifespan, offering accessible care with a focus on openness and encouraging healthy lifestyle choices.

With a background in emergency medicine, LeVan is a trained sexual assault nurse examiner. Her other interests include women’s health and sports medicine, especially for young people.

LeVan is a former marathoner, who twice finished as the top U.S. female in the Boston Marathon, finished high in other major races (including a seventh-place finish in the Women’s U.S. Marathon Championships in St. Paul, Minn., in 2006) and even participated in the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trials.

She has also traveled extensively through Mexico, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Ecuador and Bolivia, serving as an athletic services coordinator for the U.S. Olympic Committee at the 2011 Pam American Games in Guadalajara and as a volunteer nurse and translator on a medical mission to Nicaragua.

She is married with a daughter and co-owns her family’s farm, the ALL Together Farm in Randolph Center, selling sustainably produced meats and eggs.

LeVan can be reached Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at the Bethel Health Center at 234-9913. She joins long-time family physicians Dr. Terry Cantlin and Dr. Mark Seymour and physician assistant Tammy Gerdes.

Gifford Cancer Program Earns National Accreditation

Commission on Cancer logoRANDOLPH – The Commission on Cancer of the American College of Surgeons has granted accreditation with commendation to the cancer program at Gifford Medical Center through 2013.

A facility receives accreditation with commendation following an onsite evaluation by a physician surveyor during which the facility demonstrates a commendation level of compliance with one or more standards that represent the full scope of the cancer program (cancer committee leadership, cancer data management, clinical services, research, community outreach, and quality improvement). In addition, a facility receives a compliance rating for all other standards.

Through its oncology department, Gifford in Randolph offers area patients access to an experienced oncologist, Dr. John Valentine; care from a specially certified oncology nurse; and treatment planning and options, including outpatient chemotherapy and hormone therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer.

Cancer patients and their families additionally benefit from Gifford’s specialists and surgeons and the hospital’s robust palliative care program. Gifford also has a Cancer Committee, a patient care navigator program for women undergoing breast biopsies, and data management and quality oversight. It promotes cancer prevention, screenings, and treatment to the public through patient education and outreach efforts.

“We’re honored to be accredited once again by the Commission on Cancer,” Gifford Vice President of Surgery Rebecca O’Berry said. “This accreditation is a quality indicator for patients choosing cancer care, and an indicator that quality cancer care can be found close to home at Gifford.”

Established in 1922 by the American College of Surgeons, the Commission on Cancer is a consortium of professional organizations dedicated to improving survival rates and quality of life for cancer patients through standard-setting, prevention, research, education, and the monitoring of comprehensive, quality care. Its membership includes fellows of the American College of Surgeons and 49 national organizations that reflect the full spectrum of cancer care.

Gifford’s program has been accredited by the Commission on Cancer since 1965.

The core functions of the Commission on Cancer include setting standards for quality, multidisciplinary cancer patient care; surveying facilities to evaluate compliance with the 36 Commission on Cancer standards; collecting standardized and quality data from accredited facilities; and using the data to develop effective educational interventions to improve cancer care outcomes at the national, state, and local level.

The American Cancer Society estimates that more than 1.6 million cases of cancer will be diagnosed in 2012. There are currently more than 1,500 Commission on Cancer-accredited cancer programs in the United States and Puerto Rico, representing close to 30 percent of all hospitals. This 30 percent of hospitals diagnose and/or treat 80 percent of newly diagnosed cancer patients each year. In addition, a national network of more than 1,650 volunteer cancer liaison physicians, including internal medicine physician Jim Currie of Gifford, provides leadership and support for the Commission on Cancer Accreditation Program and other activities at local facilities.

The Accreditation Program, a component of the Commission on Cancer, sets quality-of-care standards for cancer programs and reviews the programs to ensure they conform to those standards. Accreditation is given only to those facilities that have voluntarily committed to providing the highest level of quality cancer care and that undergo a rigorous evaluation process and review of their performance. To maintain accreditation, facilities with Commission on Cancer accredited cancer programs must undergo an on-site review every three years.

Menig Once Again Recognized for Quality

Menig receives quality award

Vermont Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living Commissioner Dr. Susan Wehry, far right, and Vermont Division and Licensing and Protection Director Suzanne Leavitt, far left, present Menig Extended Care Facility Administrator Linda Minsinger and Director of Nursing Cindy Richardson, center, a Nursing Home Quality Recognition on June 6 in a ceremony in Colchester.

RANDOLPH – For an eighth consecutive year, the Menig Extended Care Facility at Gifford Medical Center has received a quality recognition from the state of Vermont and Vermont Health Care Association (VHCA).

The Vermont Department of Disabilities, Aging, and Independent Living and VHCA awarded Menig the Nursing Home Quality Recognition on June 6 in a ceremony at the Hilton in Colchester.

Receiving the recognition on Menig’s behalf were nursing home Administrator Linda Minsinger and Director of Nursing Cindy Richardson.

“I’m very proud of my staff. I know the residents receive excellent physical care, but are also treated with respect and dignity,” said Richardson, noting staff members demonstrate their care and compassion for the residents daily through every conversation, hand held, or care administered.

The award, offered annually to nursing homes in Vermont meeting certain criteria, looks at resident and family satisfaction, state survey results, participation and data entry into the National Advancing Excellence Quality Program, and lack of family complaints.

Good care contributes greatly to achieving those markers, but Richardson noted that it takes a larger team to have such a high-quality home for residents.

“The core of the recognition is the aides who give them care and the nurses who guide the care,” Richardson said, “but the facility is also clean, it has good food and it’s well-maintained. That’s what also makes it a quality place to live and work.”

The nursing home’s dedicated group of volunteers and chaplaincy volunteers also contribute greatly to Menig’s warmth and offerings, Richardson said.

“I’m very proud that Gifford staff has done that great of a job for all these years to meet the state’s highest award for quality for a nursing home. It shows what a great team we have working together,” Minsinger added.

Named for the late Howard and Gladys Menig of Braintree, Menig was first built attached to Gifford Medical Center in 1998 to provide enhanced quality of care to residents of the state-closed Tranquility Nursing Home in Randolph.

Repeatedly recognized for its high-quality care both on a state and national level, 30-bed Menig is the only nursing home in Orange County and highly sought after as a place to live one’s final years.

Now the hospital is hoping to provide care and housing options to a greater number of seniors through the creation of a senior living community in Randolph Center, to include independent living and a reconstructed Menig as well as assisted living in the future.

“This quality recognition is further evidence that we’re doing the right thing for our residents and poised to make an even greater difference in Randolph Center,” Director of Development and Public Relations Ashley Lincoln said.

Other/past awards for Menig

  • 2012 Honor Roll, U.S. News and World Report (a recognition given to only 39 nursing homes nationally receiving four straight quarters of five-star rankings in all categories evaluated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services)
  • 2012 Best Nursing Homes, U.S. News and World Report (award also received in 2011)
  • Excellence in Action Award, from national resident/family surveying company My InnerView (2008-2011)
  • Nursing Home Quality Recognition, Vermont Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living and the Vermont Health Care Association (2011 and 2012)
  • Nursing Home Quality Award, Vermont Department of Disabilities, Aging and Independent Living and the Vermont Health Care Association (2005-2010)
  • Gold Star Employer Award, Vermont Health Care Association (received during the seven consecutive years – 2005-2011 – the award was offered)
  • Registered Nurse of the Year, awarded to Menig nurse Judy Libby, Vermont Health Care Association (2006)
  • Nursing Director of the Year, awarded to staff member Brooks Chapin, Vermont Health Care Association (2005)

Free Talk: “Everything You Need to Know about Medicare”

free Medicare talkl

Gifford Medical Center is offering a free talk on Medicare insurance on Friday, June 29 from 2-3:30 p.m. in the hospital Conference Center.

Titled “Everything you need to know about Medicare,” the talk is for anyone who is currently on Medicare, who soon will be, or who has a parent or spouse going on Medicare.

Topics include why understanding one’s insurance is important, why participating in Medicare Part B is beneficial, and what one’s choices are under Medicare Part D.

“When making health care decisions, understanding your health insurance is vital. Medicare, which many of us have as health insurance or soon will, can be complicated to understand,” said Gail Bourassa, director of patient access and financial services at Gifford. “We’re hoping to help our patients make informed decisions by sharing what Medicare, and its various parts, covers.”

Bourassa, along with Gifford Patient Financial Services staff members Deborah Kendall, Melinda Mercier, and Michele Packard, of Health Connections, will lead the free discussion.
No registration is required. Call Gifford Patient Financial Services at (802) 728-2200 to learn more.

The Gifford Conference Center is at the medical center in Randolph at 44 S. Main St. (Route 12). Use the stairway under the green awning marked “Conference Center” or take the elevator from the main lobby/registration to the first floor.

Health Focus: Understanding Palliative Care

‘It’s not a death sentence.’ It’s patient-centered care.

Gifford's palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Gifford’s palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

With three outpatient palliative care physicians, Gifford Medical Center is already offering palliative care to outpatients early in their illness. To understand the discussion, however, you must understand the meaning of palliative care.

Gifford internal medicine provider Dr. Cristine Maloney of Randolph completed a year-long palliative medicine fellowship at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon, N.H. In the article below from Gifford, she explains the difference between palliative medicine and hospice medicine and why more of us may benefit from palliative care than we think.

One day last fall, David Wark of West Topsham awoke barely able to breath. “I thought I was going to die. I got up and I couldn’t catch my breath.”

Besides emergency care for a truck accident in the mid-’90s, the 58-year-old hadn’t been to a doctor in well over 20 years. But after that 2011 incident, and at the urging of his ex-wife and good friend, he called for an appointment.

Gifford's palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Gifford’s palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

A construction worker, Wark was helping with the remodel of Randolph’s Cumberland Farms, so he called nearby Gifford Medical Center.

He got in right away, undergoing pulmonary function testing, X-rays and blood work and then sitting down with internal medicine physician Dr. Cristine Maloney.

“‘Don’t bull#@*# me. Just tell me the truth,’” Wark remembers telling the doctor.

The truth was worse than he expected. Wark, who had struggled with shortness of breath for years, suffered from tuberculosis as a child, experienced asbestos exposure and smoked since his teens, had late stage emphysema, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

He didn’t know it at the time, but the diagnosis meant Wark was now a palliative care patient.

“Palliative medicine is designed for anyone who has a serious illness,” says Dr. Maloney. She lists cancer, dementia, heart failure, COPD, liver disease, renal failure, stroke, cystic fibrosis, congenital malformations and extreme prematurity as examples. “It’s any illness that has the potential to shorten your life.”

For those patients, palliative medicine focuses on providing relief from symptoms, pain and

Gifford's palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Gifford’s palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

the stress associated with having a serious illness. It involves listening to patients so their treatment is aligned with what is important to them. It works to enhance the patient’s, as well as their family’s or caregiver’s, quality of life through symptom management. And it includes an interdisciplinary team of caregivers helping to care for the patient’s diverse needs, not just treating his or her disease.

Palliative care is often confused with hospice care.

Hospice medicine is subset of palliative medicine, but is for patients nearing the end of life. Medicare defines hospice care as for a patient who two doctors have determined has six months or less to live and who understands that care going forward will be palliative, not curative, Dr. Maloney explains. Most private insurers have similar definitions, although sometimes allow patients to pursue both symptom management and life prolonging treatments.

Palliative care is offered early and throughout an illness. It doesn’t mean foregoing curative treatments. And it doesn’t mean giving up your primary care provider to meet with a palliative care physician like Dr. Maloney.

Gifford's palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Gifford’s palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Instead it is an extra layer of care, where a doctor spends time with patients to determine their wishes, help them understand their options and navigate the health care system, and answer their questions so they have better control over their disease and their care.

Long-time internal medicine physician Dr. Milt Fowler has referred patients to Dr. Maloney and Gifford’s other palliative care physicians. “My referrals to Dr. Maloney are to have her join forces with me in caring for patients with serious illnesses that would be helped by a team approach,” Dr. Fowler said.

“The palliative care specialty is young, but very useful. Patients who I have referred have felt our team approach has offered them more options and more availability. We have used this team approach both in office consults as well as with a number of home visits, which we often make together,” he said.

Research also backs what Gifford physicians have found anecdotally to be true.
“Many, many guidelines say this is the way to go. If you get patients onboard sooner, they do better,” Dr. Maloney says, citing studies from Massachusetts General Hospital and Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center that found cancer patients undergoing palliative care had a better quality of life and improved mood, and, in the case of the Mass General study of metastatic lung cancer patients, slightly longer lives with less aggressive care.

This type of care also often produces less confusion and conflict with family or friends about a patient’s treatment goals, says Dr. Maloney.

Gifford's palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Gifford’s palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Over a longer appointment than the average doctor’s visit or over several appointments if the patient isn’t yet ready to discuss certain topics, Dr. Maloney determines a patient’s wishes by asking questions – without judgment – about treatment wishes; their home and financial resources, including family support and worries or concerns about their illness; their spiritual beliefs; if they want to know more about their prognosis; and their wishes should they be unable to speak for themselves.

“No one asks people what they want. They make the assumption they want the most care possible, which may not be the best care possible,” says Dr. Maloney, who often hears “I want to be home,” “I don’t want to travel to get treatment,” “I want to play with my grandkids” or even “I want to putter in my woodshed.”

Based on a patient’s wishes, Dr. Maloney then provides help achieving the patient’s goals to the best extent possible. That help might include referrals to a massage or music therapist, a visit with a chaplain or social worker, or help completing an Advance Directive and expressing wishes to family.

Gifford's palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

Gifford’s palliative care physician Dr. Cristine Maloney with a palliative care patient

In Wark’s case, Dr. Maloney prescribed breathing medications and recommended both that he quit smoking and participate in the medical center’s pulmonary rehabilitation program. He’s chosen not to pursue pulmonary rehabilitation yet, but has cut back on his smoking and says the medications have greatly improved his life.

“It’s a lifesaver. I can walk up my hill now,” says Wark, who is staying active with yard work and walking his Siberian husky dogs.

He knows “there’s going to come a time eventually that I’ll have to have oxygen.”

He’s OK with that. But he has also discussed that he doesn’t want the kind of aggressive care his own mother, for example, received for cancer. “I’d rather live a shorter life, but be more comfortable than receive very aggressive medications. I don’t like it. I don’t want it,” says Wark, who has signed a “do not resuscitate” order, which he’s shared with his ex-wife and keeps on his fridge.

And he remains upbeat about this illness.

“I’m not going to sit around and feel sorry for myself,” says Wark, who should have years to live. “It’s not a death sentence. You just have to deal with it and let the doctor help you.”

In addition to Dr. Maloney, Gifford’s palliative care physicians who can help are Drs. David Pattison, an internal medicine provider and pediatrician, and Jonna Goulding, a family physician. All three palliative care physicians serve on Gifford’s multidisciplinary Advanced Illness Care Team, which aims to promote and provide patient-focused palliative and hospice care both in the outpatient and inpatient settings.

Help Wanted!

We have two fantastic job opportunities right now at Gifford Medical Center in beautiful central Vermont:

Physical Therapy

help wantedGifford Medical Center in beautiful Randolph, Vermont, is seeking a Physical Therapist to work in our Advanced Physical Therapy practice in Wilder, Vermont. This is a unique opportunity to work in a spectacular setting at a rural, financially stable, non-profit hospital with a progressive philosophy, supportive administrative team, and advanced technology.

Your teammates include several PTs and OTs, with a variety of experience levels and many with specialized areas of interest. Work for a strong rehabilitation department but in an established, personalized satellite clinic with another therapist. Opportunities include working in our aquatics program. We encourage those who wish to pursue a current discipline of interest, or develop specific skills in conjunction with the needs of the department.

The successful candidate will have strong time management skills, be a member of a team, and demonstrate critical thinking and strong patient care values. We offer a flexible schedule to fit the candidate and clinic’s needs. Current PT licensure by the State of Vermont required. EOE

Speech Therapy

Gifford Medical Center in beautiful Randolph, Vermont, is seeking a Speech/Language Pathologist to work in our multidisciplinary Rehab Services Department. This is a unique opportunity to work in a spectacular setting at a rural, financially stable, non-profit hospital with a progressive philosophy, supportive administrative team and advanced technology.

The Speech/Language Pathologist will be responsible for providing direct patient care services to the following patient populations: inpatients/outpatients/long-term care; developmentally delayed; laryngectomy; left and right hemisphere CVA; maxillofacial surgery; patients with congenital neurological impairment; patients with neurogenic degenerative diseases; temporary non-speaking patients; and those with specific language impairments.

This position provides assessment and treatment for: Aphasia; Augmentative Communications; Cognitive Rehabilitation; Developmental Language Impairment; Reading and Writing Disorders; Speech Disorders; Swallowing Disorders; and Voice Disorders. Actively participate in a team-oriented approach to care of the patient, while communicating in a positive and professional manner.

The successful applicant will be certified by American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, or in the process of obtaining certification. Requirements include eligible for state licensure, graduate from accredited program, and have completed CCC’s. Master’s level SLP training, expertise in voice, swallowing, early intervention, AAC preferred. EOE

For more information or to apply, contact Janice Davis,
Human Resources Supervisor,
 (802) 728-2634.

Gifford Holding First Antique and Artisan’s Fair

Event brings back Gifford yard sale, in part, plus much more

Gifford antique and artisan fairRANDOLPH – Gifford Medical Center will open its new park space up to the public on Saturday, July 21 with a 1st Annual Randolph Antique and Artisan’s Fair.

To be held from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. rain or shine, the fair is open to individuals or businesses selling antiques, architectural salvage, collectibles, crafts, unique items, vintage clothing and more.

Up to five food vendors will be welcomed. And Gifford will be selling some used office items, such as desks and printers. A consignment area will also be available for those with only a few items to sell.

“This is an opportunity to welcome the community to our new park space and to celebrate our unique artisan and historical cultures,” said organizer Amanda Wheeler of Gifford. “Even though health care is our focus, if you take a walk around Gifford, you’ll see history, art and community are all central to our local hospital.”

Organizers at the hospital hope to make the fair an annual event.

“We already have great interest from vendors and crafters and are expecting more over the coming weeks,” said Wheeler.

Lot sizes are 15-feet by 15-feet with up to three lots available per person/business. Lots are $20 each and space is limited. Call Wheeler at 728-2238 or e-mail awheeler@giffordmed.org by July 13 to reserve a space while they last.

Not accepted are animals, cars, junk or merchandise from distributors such as Pampered Chef, Avon, Snap-on tools, etc.

Vendors must supply their own tents, should they want them. Some tables are available for a nominal fee.

Contributing to the Economy as an Employer

Kingwood Health Center

The renovated Kingwood Health Center on Route 66 in Randolph is now home to Gifford’s Diabetes Clinic and outpatient rehabilitation services.

The following is an excerpt from our 2011 Annual Report.

There are a variety of ways to define the health of a community. Gifford often defines it in  terms of physical wellness. But a hospital as a local employer also impacts a region’s economic health.

“The economic health of our community is tied to the stability and health of its institutions  as well as its individuals. Gifford provides both health services for area residents and a broad range of employment opportunities in our community,” notes Julie Iffland, executive director of the Randolph Area Community Development Corp.

The U.S. Department of Labor ranks Gifford 29th in the state among the 50 largest  employers. A second ranking by Vermont Business Magazine places Gifford at 42nd in Vermont for number of full-time employees. (The difference between the two rankings is that U.S. Department of Labor data does not tally businesses with multiple sites, like Shaw’s supermarkets. Instead locations are counted separately affecting overall employee
numbers.)

Of Gifford’s total 589 full and part-time employees, 98 percent live in Vermont, including 71 percent who live in what the hospital deems its primary service area, where they are likely paying taxes, using services and shopping.

Drive by Gifford at lunchtime and the economic impact is evident. Employees regularly trek into town to run errands and to shop.

Gifford's impact on Randolph

Many Gifford employees walk downtown on their lunch break to run errands and shop.

In fiscal year 2011, Gifford spent more than $5.5 million with vendors in 99 Vermont  towns, including more than $1.1 million spent in Randolph alone.

The Vermont Association of Hospitals and Health Systems estimates that its member hospitals directly provide more than 15,000 jobs in Vermont, injecting more than $309 million into state government programs (through tax payments and the like) and generating more than $1.79 billion in total economic impact in Vermont in 2009 dollars.

But Gifford’s impact goes beyond simple buying and spending, notes Ben Merrill, Randolph Area Chamber of Commerce executive director. “Gifford is not only a great employer, but a great neighbor,” says Ben. He points to hospital facilities and recent renovation projects, like the Kingwood Health Center on the Route 66 corridor and a house on Highland Avenue in the downtown.

“Everything Gifford touches is better,” Ben says, calling these projects, while fairly small in size, huge in impact. “Improvement projects like these transform entire neighborhoods.”

Gifford is also in many ways a community center. “Gifford has opened its doors to the community. It’s a very warm and welcoming place,” he says, pointing to the active Conference Center and catering service as an example.

Having a strong medical center further enhances the area overall, causing a multiplier effect in the community.

“When people look to relocate to an area, to have a medical center, an all-inclusive medical center, that’s a big draw,” Ben says. “Employers like Gifford attract people who will come and stay and make their own investment in the community.”

Gifford Medical Center

Gifford bought and renovated this apartment house on Highland Avenue, shown before and after improvements were made. The home is used as temporary housing for new Medical Staff moving to the area.